Associate of Applied Science - Computer Systems and Applications Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Dean Stacey Hilton (928) 717-7775
Instructional Assistant Jessee Porter (928) 776-2312

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Computer Systems and Applications

The Computer Systems and Applications degree program prepares students for employment in entry level positions in the computing field. Students interested in a transfer program in computer science or business information systems should see an academic advisor for an educational plan.

Note: Prior to enrolling in any Computer Systems and Applications (CSA) course, the student must complete CSA111 - Keyboarding or demonstrate mastery of keyboarding skills.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Computer Systems and Applications Degree program, the learner will be able to:

  1. Define a problem with possible solutions and follow through to a possible solution. (CNT 110, CSA 110, CSA 126, CSA 161, CSA 164, CSA 167, CSA 170, CSA 179, CSA 201, CSA 266, CSA 281, CSA 282, CSA 294, WEB/ART 130)
  2. Identify and evaluate technology needs, and apply and adapt acquired skills to address the identified needs. (CNT 100, CNT 110, CSA 161, CSA 164, CSA 167, CSA 170, CSA 179, CSA 201, CSA 266, CSA 281, CSA 294)
  3. Communicate ideas clearly and effectively. (CNT 100, CNT 110, CSA 110, CSA 126, CSA 170, CSA 179, CSA 201, CSA 281, CSA 282, CSA 294, WEB/ART 130)
  4. Use technology to solve problems and increase productivity. (CNT 100, CNT 110, CSA 110, CSA 126, CSA 161, CSA 164, CSA 167, CSA 170, CSA 179, CSA 201, CSA 266, CSA 281, CSA 282, CSA 294, WEB/ART 130)
  5. Identify ethical issues in the business environment. (CSA 110, CSA 294)    

 

 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT152 College Algebra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 152. College Algebra (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1151. Modeling of applications using linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Introduction to solving systems of equations using matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear Functions
2. Quadratic and other nonlinear functions
3. Exponential and logarithmic functions
4. Polynomial functions
5. Systems of equations and matrices
6. Technology in mathematics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use technology to recognize trends in data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL1-4)
2. Create suitable functions that model data using technology. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-3)
3. Analyze an application using a function developed from data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-4)
4. Add, subtract and multiply matrices in the context of an application. (5,6) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Solve a system of equations using matrices and technology. (5,6) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT167 Elementary Statistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 167. Elementary Statistics (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1160. Statistical tools and techniques used in research and general applications. Description of sample data, probability and probability distributions, point and interval estimates of population parameters, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 142 or 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Descriptive statistics
2. Probability
3. Normal distribution
4. Research design
5. Sampling strategies
6. Confidence intervals
7. Hypotheses testing of one population
8. Hypothesis testing of two population
9. Tests of categorical data
10. Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Tables
11. Regression and correlation
12. Statistics technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use both numerical and graphical methods to describe data. (1) (QL 1,3)
2. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variability. (1) (QL 1-3)
3. Compute probabilities for both simple and compound events. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply the normal distribution to probability problems and estimation of population parameters. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Critique the research methods of others, and use research methodology. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
6. Produce representative random samples. (5) (QL 1,4)
7. Calculate and interpret confidence intervals as estimates of population parameters. (6) (QL 1-4)
8. Perform hypothesis tests about means and other parameters from large and small samples using one and multiple sample methods. (7,8) (QL 1-4)
9. Test hypothesis about categorical data. (9) (QL 1-4)
10. Recognize appropriate use of Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Table tests. (10) (QL 1-3)
11. Use regression and correlation to test hypothesis and create models for bivariate data. (11) (QL 1-4)
12. Use both hand-held calculators and desktop computers to perform statistical analysis. (12) (QL 1)

3
OR MAT172 Finite Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 172. Finite Mathematics (3). Various analytic methods employed in business, social and life sciences with an emphasis on applications. Topics include algebra review, linear programming, matrix operations, linear systems of equations, set theory, counting, probability and statistics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear functions and their graphs
2. Matrices
3. Linear systems of equations
4. Linear programming
5. Set theory
6. Counting techniques
7. Probability theory
8. Statistics
9. Finance problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform elementary matrix operations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion. (2) (QL 1-3)
2. Solve n-by-m linear systems of equations using elementary row operations. (1,3) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Solve linear programming problems by graphical and algebraic techniques. (1,4) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Perform the basic operations of union, intersection and complement on sets. (5) (QL 1)
5. Use Venn diagrams, combinations and permutations in applications involving counting. (6) (QL 1)
6. Evaluate probabilities of simple, compound, independent and dependent events. (7) (QL 1-4)
7. Compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a collection of statistical data. (8) (QL 1-4)
8. Apply the theory of normal and binomial probability distributions to statistics problems. (8) (QL 1-3)
9. Compute the present value of an annuity, interest on mortgages, and cash flow. (9) (QL 1,2,4)

3
OR MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

5
OR MAT212 Survey of Calculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 212. Survey of Calculus (3). Introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, life, and social sciences. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Limits and continuity
2. Derivatives
3. The laws of differentiation
4. Integration
5. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Evaluate limits. (1) (QL 1-4)
3. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,4)
4. Determine maxima and minima of functions by applying differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,2)
5. Use calculus to analyze and graph functions. (2,5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (4,5) (QL 1,4)

3
OR MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
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Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
 
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Physical & Biological Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biological science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AGS103 Plant Biology   4
BIO100 Biology Concepts   4
BIO103 Plant Biology   4
BIO105 Environmental Biology   4
BIO107 Introduction to Biotechnology   4
BIO108 Concepts in Plant Biology   4
BIO109 Natural History Southwest   4
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health   4
BIO160 Intro Human Anat & Physiology   4
BIO181 General Biology I   4
BIO182 General Biology II   4
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I   4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II   4
BIO205 Microbiology   4
CHM121 Environmental Chemistry   4
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry   4
CHM138 Chemistry for Allied Health   5
CHM151 General Chemistry I   5
CHM152 General Chemistry II   5
CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I   4
CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab   1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II   4
CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab   1
ENV105 Environmental Biology   4
ENV110 Environmental Geology   4
ENV121 Environmental Chemistry   4
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography   4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology   4
GLG100 Concepts in Basic Geology   2
GLG101 Intro to Geology I   4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II   4
GLG110 Environmental Geology   4
GLG116 Geology Verde Valley   2
GLG117 Implications Plate Tectonics   2
GLG118 Evolution of Basin and Range   2
GLG119 Geology of Grand Canyon   2
GLG120 Geology of Northern Arizona   2
GLG121 Volcanoes/Earthquakes N AZ   2
GLG122 Geology of Death Valley   2
GLG123 Geology of Bryce and Zion   2
GLG124 Geology of the Prescott Region   2
PHY100 Intro to Astronomy   4
PHY111 General Physics I   4
PHY112 General Physics II   4
PHY140 The Physical World   4
PHY150   
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II   5
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Behavioral OR Social Science (3 credits)
Choose one course from either list
 
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Behavioral Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152   
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
OR
 
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Social Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Computing Systems & Applications  Requirements
CSA110 Intro Computer Info System

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 110. Introduction to Computer Information Systems (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCIS 1120.Business information systems from a business intelligence perspective. Includes the uses of application software with emphasis on database and spreadsheet packages for efficient and effective problem solving. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The Internet, the World Wide Web and e-commerce
2. Components of the system unit including input, output, and storage
3. Operating systems, utility programs, and disk and file management
4. Communications, networks and their topology
5. Database management (Microsoft Access) and spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel)
6. Computers and society, security (e.g., malware and firewalls), privacy, and ethics
7. Information systems in business
8. Enterprise computing
9. Computer careers and certification

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define the basic components of a computer system. (2)
2. Identify the basic components of the Internet and the World Wide Web. (1)
3. Describe the functions of an operating system and utility programs. (3)
4. Identify components necessary for communications and networking. (4)
5. Describe the basic functions and uses of databases and spreadsheets. (5)
6. Design, create and enter data into Excel spreadsheets and Access databases. (5)
7. Evaluate the issues related to computer security risks, information privacy, and ethics. (6,7)
8. Identify the phases and the activities in the system development cycle. (7,8)
9. Describe career opportunities and certification requirements in the computer industry. (9)

3
CSA126 Microsoft Office

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 126. Microsoft Office (3). Introductory concepts and techniques of Microsoft Office including Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Windows concepts and skills
2. Microsoft Word for Windows
3. Microsoft Excel for Windows
4. Microsoft Access for Windows
5. Microsoft PowerPoint for Windows
6. Integration of Microsoft Office applications

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use file management and other basic Windows skills. (1)
2. Produce and edit word processing documents. (2)
3. Produce and edit spreadsheets and charts. (3)
4. Create a database, enter and manipulate data, create queries and reports. (4)
5. Produce and edit presentation graphics documents. (5)
6. Produce a document that integrates the use of two or more Office applications. (6)

3
CSA161 Intro to Computer Science

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 161. Introduction to Computer Science (3). Introduction to modern computer science including programming languages, structured and object oriented design and logic tools. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. 3D graphic animation
2. Introduction to Alice 3.1
3. Introduction to Java Programming
4. Introduction to Microsoft Visual Basic and Visual C#
5. Computer Science concepts including effective structuring
6. Classes and objects
7. Methods
8. Class characteristics and properties
9. Creating instances (objects) of classes
10. Variables: static, dynamic, local and global
11. Conditional branching
12. Loops: For loops, While loops, Do-While looping
13. Event driven programming
14. Frames
15. Introduction to Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs)
16. Object Oriented Programming (OOP)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Compose 3D graphic animation programs (1,2,5)
2. Incorporate objects, behavior and properties into programs (1-4, 6-12)
3. Explain the concept of Object Oriented Programming (1-4,16)
4. Identify error handling techniques and problem solving (2,5)
5. Compose error free programs (1-4)
6. Develop various frame models. (14,15)
7. Develop event driven software. (13)

3
CSA164 C# Programming Fundamentals

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 164. C# Programming Fundamentals (3) (Spring). Introduction to C# language. Includes Visual Studio, form applications, debugging programs, object oriented programming, and database programming. Prerequisite: CSA 161. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to Visual Studio
a. Using the interface
b. Accessing command help
c. Finding all the tools
2. Windows Form Applications
a. Structure of a windows form application
b. Application commands commonly used
c. Working with numbers and strings
d. Handling exceptions (Oops it crashed)
3. The art of Debugging programs
a. Setting breakpoints
b. Walking through the code
c. Watching the variables change
4. Object Oriented Programming Concepts
a. Creating and using classes
b. Working with indexers, delegates, events and operators
c. How to use inheritance
d. Using interfaces and generics
e. Organizing and Documenting
5. Database Programming
a. Introduction to database programming
b. Use database sources
c. Use ADO.NET to write data access code
d. Use database sources with business objects
6. Other C# developer skills
a. Working with files and streams
b. Working with XML
c. Enhancing the user interface
d. Deploying an application

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use the Visual Studio environment (1)
2. Explain how to find help on different C# topics (2,6)
3. Identify key command with the C# language (1,2)
4. Produce simple form applications (2,4,6)
5. Explain and use several debugging procedures (1,2,3,4,5)
6. Explain Object Oriented programming (4)
7. Use data structure creation using generics (2,4,5)
8. Explain how to connect a C# program to a database (5)
9. Deploy an application (6)

3
CSA167 PHP and MySQL Programming

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 167. PHP and MySQL Programming (3) (Fall). Principles and techniques of developing small to medium scale database applications, and creating web databases that are accessed by Web pages. This course is cross-listed with WEB 167. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Basic Vocabulary
2. Loops
3. Arrays
4. Strings
5. Regular Expressions
6. Time and Date Functions
7. Integer and Float Functions
8. Database Basics
9. Querying
10. Connecting to a MySQL Database
11. Formatting Results
12. User-Driven Queries
13. Writing to Web Databases
14. Validation
15. Keeping State
16. Session Management
17. Protecting Data

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify PHP language syntax (1)
2. Compose web pages for upload (10,13)
3. Incorporate PHP code into HTML (2,3,4,5)
4. Explain how MySQL is used as a web database (10)
5. Identify HTML tags (1,6,7,8,9)
6. Create and prepare a MySQL database (12,11,14,15,16,17)
7. Identify, analyze and synthesize design principles (1, 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)
8. Use PHP functions appropriately in effective web page design (2,3,4,5)
9. Explain the relationship between query strategies (10)

3
CSA170 PC Architecture

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 170. PC Architecture (3) (Spring). Introduction to hardware components of a microcomputer. Emphasis on equipment comparisons, hardware requirements, and operating systems. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Microcomputer bus design
2. A history of CPU development
3. Input-output ports
4. Memory
5. Operating systems
6. Hard disk capacity requirements
7. Special multimedia hardware requirements
8. Networking requirements of the PC
9. Requirements studies
10. Cost effectiveness analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the different types of bus design.
2. Identify the types of memory chips.
3. Describe the organization and structure of the operating system.
4. Describe the minimum hardware requirements for an operating system.
5. Select an optimal multimedia system.
6. Evaluate the hardware requirements for networking a PC.
7. Perform a requirements study and select a cost effective computer system.

3
CSA179 Survey Operating Systems

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 179. Operating Systems (3) (Spring). A survey of the operating systems used today with the purpose of preparing technicians to install and maintain operating systems. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Operating system theory
2. Comparison of operating systems: Unix, Windows NT, 98, 95
3. Disks, tapes, CD, DVD, and other media
4. File systems and file system organization
5. The Unix file system
6. Initial installation, setup, and modification of operating systems
7. Upgrading to a newer version
8. Printers, plotters, and other output devices
9. Scanners, mice, and other input devices
10. Modems and other communications devices
11. Networking and Internet connectivity
12. Resource sharing over a network
13. Standard operating and maintenance procedures

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Differentiate between hardware and software errors.
2. Determine if the operating system needs to be installed and perform the installation.
3. Distinguish between the different operating system filing structures.
4. Describe how operating systems affect input and output devices.
5. Describe how operating systems affect communications and networking.
6. Differentiate between application problems and operating system problems.
7. Install or reinstall application software.

3
CSA201 Software Maintenance

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 201. Software Maintenance and Troubleshooting (3) (Fall). Differentiating between hardware and software errors. Diagnosing and correcting software problems that are interfering with the operation of the computer. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Microsoft Windows Operating Systems review
2. Protection fault errors
3. Utilities programs
4. Scandisk, defrag, tmp files, and general file housekeeping
5. Driver problems
6. Hardware problems
7. Software conflicts
8. Formatting the hard drive
9. Hardware resource conflicts with IRQs, DMAs and ports
10. Updates, service packs and security

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Differentiate between software errors on different Operating Systems. (1,3)
2. Determine if the operating system needs to be reinstalled and perform the installation as needed. (1,2.8)
3. Repair malfunctions using Task Manager. (3,4,6,7)
4. Install e-mail programs and software drivers. (5,10)
5. Use scandisk and defrag to fix problems. (4)
6. Differentiate between application problems and operating system problems. (1,9,10)
7. Install or reinstall application software. (5,7,8,10)

3
CSA266 Adv Web Enhancement ASP.NET 4

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 266. Advanced Web Enhancement ASP.NET 4 (3) (Fall). Advanced Web Enhancement using ASP.NET 4 as used in Microsoft Visual Web Developer 2010 Express. Building an ASP.NET web site using both user and server controls. Includes both LINQ and a look at communicating with databases. This course is cross-listed with WEB 266. Prerequisite: CSA 161. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to ASP.NET 4
2. Building an ASP.NET web site
3. Designing web pages
4. Server controls
5. User controls
6. Introduction to databases
7. LINQ and the ADO.NET Entity Framework
8. Security in an ASP.NET 4 web site
9. Personalizing web sites
10. Deploying web sites

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Compose web pages using Microsoft Visual Web Developer 2010 Express. (1-4,8,9)
2. Use both user and server controls. (4,5)
3. Incorporate LINQ and C# code behind fields. (7)
4. Incorporate security controls into the login feature of a web site. (8)
5. Identify and analyze how connections to databases can be made. (6)
6. Deploy web pages. (10)

3
CSA281 Systems Analysis and Design

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 281. Systems Analysis and Design (3) (Fall). Advanced analysis of users' needs, available equipment, manpower and financial feasibility. Emphasis on procedures and program analysis in design and implementation of the total system. Individual and team approach to problem solving. Prerequisite: CSA 110 and CSA 161. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Preliminary investigation of existing system
2. Detailed investigation of existing system
3. Output design techniques
4. Input design techniques
5. File design techniques
6. Processing design techniques
7. Control design techniques
8. Presentation and approval techniques
9. System scheduling techniques
10. Program specification techniques
11. Program testing and documentation techniques
12. Trends

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze existing information systems.
2. Design information systems.
3. Formulate feasibility studies.
4. Generate system/program specifications.

3
CSA282 Microcomputer Database

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

CSA 282. Microcomputer Databases (3) (Spring). Concepts, design, implementation, evaluation, and maintenance techniques of databases. Includes fundamentals of data model, data structure and data management. Two lecture. Three lab.


COURSE CONTENT:

1. Database concepts
2. Data models
3. Data definition
4. Manipulation of the database
5. Normalization of relations (tables)
6. Relational database design
7. Building a table
8. Building a query
9. Building and customizing a form
10. Building and customizing a report
11. Use of macros
12. Building of an application

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze, define, and design a relational database.
2. Construct an application using a relational database program complete with
menus, reports, forms, and queries.
3. Update the database.

3
.
CSA294 CSA Project  1

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 294. CSA Project (1-6). This Capstone course incorporates project design, project system analysis, and technology applications. Approval of Division Dean. Prerequisite: CSA 126 and CSA 179 and CSA 281 and CSA 282. One to Six lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Project design
2. System analysis
3. Critical analysis of technology
4. Ethics in business technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Design a project that includes developing a computer program and a database, using Microsoft Office applications.
2. Analyze a total system life-cycle.
3. Analyze available technology and select most appropriate options for the project.
4. Apply ethical policies to the project.

1
AND CSA294 CSA Project

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 294. CSA Project (1-6). This Capstone course incorporates project design, project system analysis, and technology applications. Approval of Division Dean. Prerequisite: CSA 126 and CSA 179 and CSA 281 and CSA 282. One to Six lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Project design
2. System analysis
3. Critical analysis of technology
4. Ethics in business technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Design a project that includes developing a computer program and a database, using Microsoft Office applications.
2. Analyze a total system life-cycle.
3. Analyze available technology and select most appropriate options for the project.
4. Apply ethical policies to the project.

1
III.  Related Requirements
BSA102 Career Search and Success

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BSA 102. Career Search and Success: Skills for Entering and Succeeding in the Workplace (1). Techniques to enhance and emphasize the relationship between resume development and job search skills. Includes a strong focus on human relations in the workplace. One lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Job search skills and employability packet including: labor market analysis; networking and job lead development; application, resume and cover letter preparation; the interview process
2. Personal financial management
3. Workplace communication and teamwork skills
4. Workplace ethics, attitudes, absenteeism, stress management skills
5. Elements of critical thinking and decision-making including setting career and educational goals

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify employment opportunities for a field of study. (1)
2. Produce an employability packet (i.e. application, resume, cover letter, work sample, reference letter). (1)
3. Prepare for and participate in employment interview activities. (1)
4. Assess various types of communication and teamwork skills in the workplace. (3)
5. Discuss workplace ethics, attitudes, absenteeism, stress management. (4)
6. Describe the strategies involved in decision making in a job search. (5)
7. Evaluate job search efforts. (1)
8. Develop a career/educational plan. (5)
9. Identify importance of money management and budgeting. (2)

1
CNT100 Intro to Computer Networking

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CNT 100. Introduction to Computer Networking Technology (3). Introduction to technologies, terminology, and skills used in the world of computer networking. Preparation for the Network+ Certification exam. Three lecture. One lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Computer network fundamentals
2. Network hardware essentials
3. Network topologies and technologies
4. Network media
5. Network protocols
6. Network models and standards

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify computer and network components and describe network communication. (1)
2. Describe the function of common network hardware. (2)
3. Compare and contrast characteristics of the major network topologies and technologies. (3)
4. Describe network media characteristics and install network cabling. (4)
5. Configure and describe the operation of network protocols. (5)
6. Describe the OSI and TCP/IP models of networking. (6)

3
CNT110 A+ Comp Tech Certification

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CNT 110. A+ Computer Technician Certification (4). Install, configure, support, and troubleshoot personal computers. Emphasis on PC hardware, and installation, operation, and upgrade procedures. Focus on practical networking in a PC environment along with server hardware maintenance and troubleshooting. Preparation for the Comp TIA A+ Certification exam. This course, with CNT 120, prepares the learner for the Comp/TIA Server+ Certification Exam. Preparedness Recommendations: Experience using a computer keyboard and accessing the Internet with a web browser. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Information Technology (IT) basics
2. How Computers Work
3. Assembling a Computer
4. Troubleshooting PC Hardware
5. Preventive Maintenance
6. Operating System Fundamentals
7. Troubleshooting Software and Operating Systems
8. Multimedia Capabilities
9. Printers and Printing
10. Hardware Fundamentals for Servers
11. Networking Fundamentals

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the fundamentals of information technology (IT) and identify major IT components in a PC environment.
2. Install, configure, and upgrade PC hardware components, PC peripherals, and PC firmware.
3. Diagnose and troubleshoot a variety of PC hardware and peripheral component problems.
4. Identify and avoid potential safety hazards while working with PCs.
5. Identify PC components related to the PC motherboard, processors, and memory modules.
6. Implement preventive maintenance procedures.
7. Utilize common PC operating systems and discuss their operation.
8. Diagnose and troubleshoot PC software and operating systems problems.
9. Work with multimedia components in a PC environment.
10. Describe the printing process and identify printer components for a variety of printing technologies.
11. Implement care and maintenance procedures for printers.
12. Compare and contrast server hardware requirements versus PC hardware requirements.
13. Describe redundant disk configurations.
14. Configure and upgrade major server components.
15. Describe basic networking concepts including topologies, protocols, and network components.
16. Install and configure network cards and identify network media types.
17. Identify the causes of common network problems.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Cisco Academy on-line chapter exams and final exam. Cisco Academy skills final exam.

4
.
ART130 Web Site Design I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 130. Web Site Design I (3) (Fall). Introduction to design and production of Web pages for publishing on the Internet using Adobe Creative Suite software. Application of design principles. This course is cross-listed with WEB 130. Prerequisite: ART 137 (may be taken concurrently). Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. HTML
2. Web-safe colors
3. Tour interface
4. Site management
5. Site plan
6. Web images
7. Links and anchors
8. Cascading styles and tables
9. Dreamweaver software skills
10. Formal elements and principles of design
11. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts
12. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Develop web pages using HTML. (1)
2. Develop studies using Adobe Photoshop web-safe color (2)
3. Identify the main elements of the Windows/Mac web interface. (3, 9)
4. Construct a site with local root folder. (4, 9)
5. Implement the three phases of web design (5, 9)
a. information
b. interaction
c. presentation
6. Optimize images using Adobe Photoshop. (6)
7. Use web page functions to enter and format information on a web page. (7, 9)
8. Define the structure on a web page utilizing cascading styles and tables. (8)
9. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (10)
10. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (11)
11. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (12)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
OR WEB130 Web Site Design I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
WEB 130. Web Site Design (3) (Fall). Introduction to design and production of Web pages for publishing on the Internet using Adobe Creative Suite software. Application of design principles. This course is cross-listed with ART 130. Prerequisite: ART 137 (may be taken concurrently). Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. HTML
2. Web-safe colors
3. Tour interface
4. Site management
5. Site plan
6. Web images
7. Links and anchors
8. Cascading styles and tables
9. Dreamweaver software skills
10. Application of principles and elements of design
11. Introduction to traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
12. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Develop web pages using HTML. (1)
2. Develop studies using Adobe Photoshop web-safe color (2)
3. Identify the main elements of the Windows/Mac web interface. (3, 9)
4. Construct a site with local root folder. (4, 9)
5. Implement the three phases of web design (5, 9)
a. information
b. interaction
c. presentation
6. Optimize images using Adobe Photoshop. (6)
7. Use web page functions to enter and format information on a web page. (7, 9)
8. Define the structure on a web page utilizing cascading styles and tables. (8)
9. Identify, analyze and synthesize principles and elements of design. (10)
10. Recognize traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art. (11)
11. Use media design terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (12)

3
1 - CSA 294 must be taken for 2 credit hours

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.