Associate of Applied Science - Nursing Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Instructional Specialist Nita Hillig (928) 776-2017
Program Director Mary Brown (928) 776-2255
Dean Scott Farnsworth (928) 776-2234

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Nursing

Application for Admission to the Nursing Program
Special application is required for admission to the nursing program. A Nursing Applicant Information Guide, available from the Advising Center and online at the Nursing website, describes program prerequisites and application process. Refer to the Nursing website: www.yc.edu/nursing for application deadlines.

Advanced Placement
Returning nursing students, graduates of state-approved practical nursing programs and students transferring from state-approved nursing programs may apply for advanced placement. The application procedure is described in the advanced placement Nursing Applicant Information Guide.

Transfer Students
Students transferring from other regionally accredited institutions will have their completed general education coursework evaluated on an individual basis.

Health Declaration
It is essential that nursing students be able to perform a number of physical activities in the clinical portion of the program. At minimum, students will be required to lift clients, stand for several hours at a time and perform bending activities. The clinical nursing experience also places students under considerable mental and emotional stress as they undertake responsibilities and duties impacting clients’ lives. Students must be able to demonstrate rational and appropriate behavior under stressful conditions. Individuals should give careful consideration to the mental and physical demands of the program prior to making application. The technical standards for the program are identified in the Nursing Applicant Information Guide.

Graduation Requirement
All required courses for the A.A.S. in Nursing degree must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.

The Associate Degree Nursing program is designed to prepare qualified students for beginning employment as staff nurses giving direct care to clients. The program is fully accredited by the Arizona State Board of Nursing and the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). Upon successful completion of the program, students will be awarded the Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree and be eligible to make application to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

Licensure
Graduation from the Yavapai College Associate Degree Nursing program is not the sole criteria for obtaining a license to practice nursing in Arizona. Licensing requirements are the exclusive responsibility of the Arizona State Board of Nursing (Nurse Practice Act and Rules of the State Board of Nursing), and students must satisfy those requirements independently of their satisfaction of any requirements for graduation from the college.

See Nursing Applicant Information Guide for additional information.

Transfer
Students intending to transfer courses toward a baccalaureate degree in nursing should consult the catalog of the school to which they plan to transfer. Materials are available in the Advising Center and through the Department of Nursing to assist students in selecting courses equivalent to those required in baccalaureate nursing programs in Arizona. Generally 64 credits from community colleges are transferable to Arizona public universities: specific articulation information is available through the Arizona Course Applicability System (CAS) website: www.aztransfer.com

Note: Prerequisite - NSG 114 Nursing Assistant OR CNA licensure within the past 2 years.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Nursing Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Clinical Competence: Synthesize knowledge and skills to independently provide nursing care for groups of clients with multiple health care needs and problems.
  2. Critical Thinking: Synthesize knowledge and skills to formulate and implement decisions related to complex nursing practice situations.
  3. Caring: Synthesize knowledge and skills, awareness of need, and uses of empathy to protect, enhance and preserve human dignity.
  4. Diversity/Culture: Apply concepts of diversity/culture in the provision of nursing care to individuals, families or groups.
  5. Communication: Incorporate evaluation and modification of communications skills in nursing practice.
  6. Learning/Teaching: Use the nursing process to meet the learning needs of individuals, families and peers.
  7. Accountability: Examine ethical and political issues within the healthcare system. Take responsibility and accountability for personal actions.
  8. Management/Leadership: Collaborate with other personnel within the organizational structure to manage client care through supervision, delegation and coordination.
 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT142 College Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 142. College Mathematics (3). Survey of mathematical topics and applications. Includes statistics, probability, exponential functions, finance, dimensional analysis and other selected discrete math topics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Algebraic Models of Growth and Decay
2. Mathematics of Personal Finance
3. Counting and Probability
4. Descriptive Statistics and the Normal Distribution
5. Dimensional Analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create and apply linear, quadratic and exponential models. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Apply the mathematics of personal finance, including compound interest, annuities, and amortized loans. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Apply the basic rules of counting: fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply basic rules of probability including compound events, conditional probability, and expected value to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Calculate and interpret graphical and numerical summaries of data, including measures of central tendency and dispersion. (4) (QL 1-4)
6. Use the basic properties of the Normal curve to solve applied problems. (4) (QL 1-4)
7. Use dimensional analysis to make conversions with metric and U.S. measurement systems. (5) (QL 1-4)

3
OR MAT152 College Algebra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 152. College Algebra (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1151. Modeling of applications using linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Introduction to solving systems of equations using matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear Functions
2. Quadratic and other nonlinear functions
3. Exponential and logarithmic functions
4. Polynomial functions
5. Systems of equations and matrices
6. Technology in mathematics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use technology to recognize trends in data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL1-4)
2. Create suitable functions that model data using technology. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-3)
3. Analyze an application using a function developed from data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-4)
4. Add, subtract and multiply matrices in the context of an application. (5,6) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Solve a system of equations using matrices and technology. (5,6) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 157. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes geometry, measurement, statistics, and probability. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Geometric shapes and definitions
2. Symmetry
3. Similarity
4. Measurement using the U.S. system and the metric system
5. Perimeter, area, surface area and volume of geometric figures
6. Euclidean construction
7. Topics in Statistics including graphs and measures of central tendency and variability
8. Probability
9. Counting techniques including combinations and permutation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize geometrical shapes and describe their properties. (1) (QL 1)
2. Observe symmetry in geometric shapes. (2) (QL 1)
3. Use similarity to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2)
4. Use measuring units including metric units. (4) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Find perimeter, area, surface area, and volumes of geometric objects. (5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Perform Euclidean constructions. (6) (QL 1)
7. Convert data from table format to graphical format. (7) (QL 3)
8. Analyze data statistically using basic measures of central tendency and measures of variability. (7) (QL 1-3)
9. Calculate the probability of the outcomes of simple experiments. (8) (QL 1-3)
10. Use counting techniques including permutations and combinations. (9) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 156. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes problem solving, set theory, properties and operations with number systems. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Problem solving strategies
2. Set theory and set operations.
3. Properties and operations with whole numbers
4. Properties and operations using other bases
5. Properties and operations with integers
6. Properties and operations with rational numbers
7. Properties and operations with decimal numbers
8. Number theory of primes, composites, and factors
9. Percents, ratios and proportions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use Polya's Four Step Model when problem-solving. (1) (QL 2,4)
2. Use set notation and perform set operations using listed sets and Venn Diagrams. (2) (QL 1)
3. Solve whole number operations and explain the algorithms used. (3) (QL 1,4)
4. Solve problems in other number bases. (4) (QL 1)
5. Solve integer number operations and explain the algorithms used. (5) (QL 1,4)
6. Solve rational number operations and explain the algorithms used. (6) (QL 1,4)
7. Solve decimal number operations and explain the algorithms used. (7) (QL 1,4)
8. Categorize numbers as prime and composite and find GCD and LCM. (8) (QL 1)
9. Solve problems using percents, ratios and proportiions. (9) (QL 2,4)

3
OR MAT167 Elementary Statistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 167. Elementary Statistics (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1160. Statistical tools and techniques used in research and general applications. Description of sample data, probability and probability distributions, point and interval estimates of population parameters, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 142 or 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Descriptive statistics
2. Probability
3. Normal distribution
4. Research design
5. Sampling strategies
6. Confidence intervals
7. Hypotheses testing of one population
8. Hypothesis testing of two population
9. Tests of categorical data
10. Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Tables
11. Regression and correlation
12. Statistics technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use both numerical and graphical methods to describe data. (1) (QL 1,3)
2. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variability. (1) (QL 1-3)
3. Compute probabilities for both simple and compound events. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply the normal distribution to probability problems and estimation of population parameters. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Critique the research methods of others, and use research methodology. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
6. Produce representative random samples. (5) (QL 1,4)
7. Calculate and interpret confidence intervals as estimates of population parameters. (6) (QL 1-4)
8. Perform hypothesis tests about means and other parameters from large and small samples using one and multiple sample methods. (7,8) (QL 1-4)
9. Test hypothesis about categorical data. (9) (QL 1-4)
10. Recognize appropriate use of Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Table tests. (10) (QL 1-3)
11. Use regression and correlation to test hypothesis and create models for bivariate data. (11) (QL 1-4)
12. Use both hand-held calculators and desktop computers to perform statistical analysis. (12) (QL 1)

3
OR MAT172 Finite Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 172. Finite Mathematics (3). Various analytic methods employed in business, social and life sciences with an emphasis on applications. Topics include algebra review, linear programming, matrix operations, linear systems of equations, set theory, counting, probability and statistics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear functions and their graphs
2. Matrices
3. Linear systems of equations
4. Linear programming
5. Set theory
6. Counting techniques
7. Probability theory
8. Statistics
9. Finance problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform elementary matrix operations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion. (2) (QL 1-3)
2. Solve n-by-m linear systems of equations using elementary row operations. (1,3) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Solve linear programming problems by graphical and algebraic techniques. (1,4) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Perform the basic operations of union, intersection and complement on sets. (5) (QL 1)
5. Use Venn diagrams, combinations and permutations in applications involving counting. (6) (QL 1)
6. Evaluate probabilities of simple, compound, independent and dependent events. (7) (QL 1-4)
7. Compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a collection of statistical data. (8) (QL 1-4)
8. Apply the theory of normal and binomial probability distributions to statistics problems. (8) (QL 1-3)
9. Compute the present value of an annuity, interest on mortgages, and cash flow. (9) (QL 1,2,4)

3
OR MAT183 Trigonometry

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 183. Trigonometry (2). Trigonometric functions, radian measure, right and oblique triangle solutions, trigonometric identities and equations, and inverse trigonometric functions. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Two lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Right angle trigonometry
2. Trigonometric functions on the unit circle
3. Radian and degree measures for angles
4. Graphs of trigonometric functions
5. The solution of oblique triangles
6. Trigonometric equations
7. Identities including composite angle identities
8. Inverse trigonometric functions
9. Inroduction to Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use the unit circle to determine trigonometric functions and their graphs. (2,3,4) (QL 1-4)
2. Solve right triangles using trigonometric ratios. (1,3) (QL 1-4)
3. Solve oblique triangles using the law of sines and the law of cosines. (3,5) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Convert degree to radian measure and radian to degree measure. (3) (QL 1)
5. Prove trigonometric identities. (7) (QL 1)
6. Solve trigonometric equations involving both trig and inverse trig functions. (1,2,4,5) (QL 1,2,4)
7. Use vectors in applied problems (9) (QL 1,2,4)

2
OR MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

5
OR MAT212 Survey of Calculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 212. Survey of Calculus (3). Introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, life, and social sciences. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Limits and continuity
2. Derivatives
3. The laws of differentiation
4. Integration
5. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Evaluate limits. (1) (QL 1-4)
3. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,4)
4. Determine maxima and minima of functions by applying differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,2)
5. Use calculus to analyze and graph functions. (2,5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (4,5) (QL 1,4)

3
OR MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all critical thinking courses

Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
       [BIO 181 is preferred]
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 156. Human Biology for Allied Health (4). An introductory biology course for allied health majors with an emphasis on humans. Topics include fundamental concepts of cell history, histology, microbiology, and genetics. Duplicate credit for BIO 100 and BIO 156 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Light microscopy
2. Scientific method
3. Introduction to biochemistry
4. Cellular structure, function, histology and reproduction
5. Cellular evolution and respiration
6. Mendelian genetics
7. Molecular genetics
8. Clinical microbiology
9. Human evolution and natural selection
10. Human impacts and the environment
11. Selected topics in human biology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use a light microscope to examine cells and cell structures. (1)
2. Describe the principles of the scientific method and relate them to topics in the allied health fields. (2) (PSB 1,2)
3. Describe the principles of biochemistry and how these principles apply to all cellular life. (3,5)
4. Describe the structure of a eukaryotic cell including the properties of the cell membrane. (4)
5. Identify common human cell types and describe the organization of human cells into tissues and organs. (4)
6. Describe cell reproduction in eukaryotes and how this process occurs in various human tissues. (4)
7. Describe the principles of cell metabolism including aerobic cellular respiration. (5)
8. Describe the evolutionary support for the domains of life. (5) (PSB 1-3)
9. Describe the principles of Mendelian genetics as they apply to inheritance in humans. (6)
10. Describe DNA structure, replication and protein synthesis. (7)
11. Identify characteristics of clinically important microbes and the diseases they produce. (8)
12. Define natural selection, describe varied evidences for evolution, and discuss the implications for human evolution. (9) (PBS 1-3)
13. Describe major ecological impacts of humans and health-related implications. (10)
14. Apply general concepts to selected topics in human biology. (11)
15. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the biology of human cells, organisms and populations. (1-11) (PBS 1,3)
16. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the biology of human cells, organisms and populations. (1-11)
17. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of data related to human cells, organisms and populations. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
18. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-11) (PBS 2)

4
OR BIO181 General Biology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 181. General Biology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1181. Biological principles emphasizing structure and function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of biological systems. Secondary school chemistry strongly recommended. Primarily for biology majors and preprofessional students in health-related fields. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific Method
2. Basic chemistry and biological macromolecules
3. Organization of cells
4. Energy and Enzymes
5. Photosynthesis
6. Cellular respiration
7. Cell division
8. Genetics
9. Gene expression and regulation
10. Gene technology
11. Data collection and analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the scientific method in problem solving (1) (PBS 1,3)
2. Describe the basic chemistry and chemical interactions of life (2)
3. Describe the structure and function of the four main types of biological macromolecules (2)
4. Identify and describe the structure and function of the parts of typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells (3)
5. Describe the properties of enzymes and their relation to cellular metabolism (4)
6. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of photosynthesis (5)
7. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of cellular respiration (6)
8. Describe the biological processes of cell division including the cell cycle, mitosis, and meiosis (7)
9. Solve mendelian and nonmendelian genetics problems (8) (PBS 2)
10. Describe the fundamental processes of gene expression and control of gene expression (9)
11. Describe basic genetic engineering techniques and tools including recombinant DNA techniques and Polymerase Chain Reaction (10)
12. Conduct experiments, observe biological phenomena, and record information in a laboratory notebook (11)

4
       2.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
PSY245 Human Growth and Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 245. Human Growth and Development (3). Study of physical, intellectual, moral, emotional, personality, and social development of the human being, beginning with conception and continuing through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, and dying. Emphasis on quantitative and qualitative ways people change throughout the life span and factors which contribute to human diversity as well as to individual uniqueness. Research methods appropriate to the study of human development are also considered. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The scientific study of human growth and development across the life span from both ethological/biological ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") perspectives
2. Theories of cognitive development across the life span
3. Theories of social-emotional development across the life span

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify current and historical scientific approaches to research in human development. (BS 2,4)
2. Analyze biological theories of development.
3. Analyze theories of cognitive development. (BS 1)
4. Analyze theories of emotional development.
5. Analyze theories of social development. (BS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
II.  Nursing Requirements
NSG131 Foundations in Nursing I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 131. Foundations in Nursing I (8). Introduction to concepts of nursing roles, holistic approach to care, critical thinking and nursing process, pharmacology, nursing skill development, effective communication techniques, learning/teaching and legal, ethical, spiritual, and diversity/culture concepts. Physiological and psychological needs in health and illness including loss, grief and dying, and peri-operative care. Clinical experiences focus on holistic assessment and other selected skills in well defined practice settings. Prerequisite: Admission to nursing program. . Five lecture. Nine lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to nursing and the Yavapai College Nursing Program
2. Critical thinking skills/Nursing Process
3. Data collection/Gordon?s Functional Health Problems
4. Medication administration
5. Therapeutic communication
6. Infection control/Safety
7. Legal/ethical issues
8. Concepts of holistic care
a. Diversity/culture/spirituality
b. Self concept/sexuality
c. Stress and adaptation
9. Learning/teaching principles
10. Expected changes with aging
11. Care of the client experiencing:
a. Limited mobility
b. Pain
c. Loss, grief, and dying
d. Surgery and diagnostic tests
e. Sensory/Perceptual alterations
f. Altered integument
g. Altered elimination
h. Sleep alterations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain fundamental concepts of nursing practice. (1,2,5,6,9,10)
2. Perform basic holistic assessmentsand safe care of adult clients. (3,5,6,8bc,10)
3. Identify legal, ethical, and professional issues for nursing practice. (7)
4. Describe cultural values, cultural diversity and spirituality in relaionship to nursing practice. (8a)
5. Safely administer medications to adult clients. (4)
Caring:
6. Differentiate between caring as an emotional response and a knowledgeable deliberative intervention.
Diversity/Culture:
7. Verbalize personal cultural values and biases.
Communication:
8. Identify therapeutic communication techniques and barriers to communicating.
Learning/Teaching:
9. Identify components of the learning/teaching process.
Accountability:
10. Identify ethical, professional, and legal frameworks for nursing practice.
Management/Leadership:
11. Work cooperatively with members of the healthcare team in the management of nursing care.
12. Complete assigned responsibilities in a timely manner.

8
NSG132 Concepts in Nursing II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 132. Concepts in Nursing II (9). Introduction to commonly occurring health care concerns. Includes oncology overview, alterations in oxygenation and perfusion, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal functions, and an introduction to management concepts. Prerequisite: NSG 131 and BIO 202 and NSG 130 or NTR 135. Five lecture. Twelve lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Beginning leadership and management principles
a. delegation
b. leadership/organization
c. supervision
d. time management
2. Nursing considerations
a. age-related considerations
b. care planning and nursing process
c. legal and ethical considerations
d. nurse/client relationship
3. Nursing management of adult clients with alterations in:
a. acid base balance
b. cell growth
c. endocrine function
d. fluid/electrolyte balance
e. renal function
f. gastrointestinal function
g. musculo-skeletal function
h. oxygenation/perfusion
i. organ donation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Investigate the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, collaborative care, and nursing management of clients with selected alterations. (2a-d) (3a-i)
2. Use the nursing process as a framework for care of clients with selected alterations. (1-3)
3. Explain nursing considerations when caring for clients with selected alterations. (2a-d) (3a-i)
4. Apply basic management skills while providing nursing care. (1a-d)

9
NSG210 Pharmacology/NSG Practice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 210. Pharmacology and Nursing Practice (3). Overview of pharmacological concepts and their relationship to nursing practice. Survey of selected drug classifications including drug actions, effects in maintaining or restoring homeostasis, side effects, adverse reactions, and application of critical thinking, including the nursing process, in the administration of medication and client teaching. Basic knowledge of chemistry, physiology and nursing recommended. Prerequisite: NSG 131. Three lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Principles of pharmacology
a. Clinical pharmacy
b. Drug families
c. Pharmacokinetics
d. Pharmacodynamics
e. Age specific considerations
2. Nursing considerations
a. Nurse-client relationships
b. Legal/ethical considerations
c. Applying the nursing process to drug therapy
d. Managing delivery of prescribed dosages
3. Selected drug families
a. CNS drugs
b. Cardiac related drugs
c. Antimicrobial drugs
d. Anti-inflammatory drugs
e. Endocrine drugs
f. Digestive drugs
g. Analgesic drugs
h. Enteral and parenteral support drugs

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain characteristics of selected drug families including direct and adverse actions, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, interactions and implications for patient monitoring and teaching.
2. Calculate appropriate dosages for delivery of prescribed medications in metric, apothecary and household measures in a variety of routes across the lifespan.
3. Apply principles of priority setting and administering medications to individuals and groups of clients.
4. Describe current legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse in drug therapy.

3
NSG231 Concepts in Nursing III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 231. Concepts in Nursing III (7). Concepts of nursing care for clients with commonly occurring health care concerns with an emphasis on the developmental periods of infancy through adolescence. Advanced intravenous therapy. Uses nursing process format and integrates learning/teaching, psychosocial, diversity/cultural, spiritual, nutritional, pharmacological, legal, and ethical aspects. Clinical practicum includes management experience in well defined practice settings. Prerequisite: ENG 102 and NSG 132 and PSY 245. Corequisite: NSG 233. Three lecture. Twelve lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Review of nursing process
2. Advanced management of IV therapy:
a. TPN.
b. Blood administration.
c. Intravenous medication administration (piggyback and push).
3. Adaptation of nursing care based on developmental needs.
4. Holistic assessment of children and adolescents
5. Concepts of care of children and their families with physical developmental disorders and chronic illness.
6. Nursing care of clients experiencing common healthcare problems related to childhood and adolescence.
a. Immunizations.
b. Cerebral palsy.
c. Cystic fibrosis.
d. Respiratory syncytial virus.
e. Laryngotracheobronchitis.
f. Meningitis.
7. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in integumentary function.
8. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in hematological function:
a. Anemia and polycythemia.
b. Leukemia.
c. Lymphoma and multiple myeloma.
d. Bleeding disorders.
9. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in immunologic function:
a. HIV infection and AIDS.
b. Rheumatic disease.
c. Diffuse connective tissue diseases.
10. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in hepatic and biliary function:
a. Hepatitis.
b. Cirrhosis.
c. Cholecystitis/cholelithiasis.
d. Cancer.
11. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in vision and hearing:
a. Assessment of vision and hearing
b. Impaired vision and hearing
c. Infections of the eye and ear
d. Problems of the inner ear

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Clinical Competence:
1. Analyze data to individualize the nursing care of clients of all ages with multiple health care needs and problems.
2. Safely prioritize and manage nursing care for groups of clients.
Critical Thinking:
3. Use critical thinking skills to formulate and implement decision making in nursing practice.
4. Evaluate client's progress toward achievement of expected outcomes and revise plan of care as needed.
Caring:
5. Employ therapeutic use of self in nursing practice.
Diversity/Culture:
6. Modify nursing care based on a client's diversity/culture.
Communication:
7. Use effective communication skills when collaborating with clients, families, peers, faculty, and other members of the health care team.
Learning/Teaching:
8. Use the nursing process to meet the learning needs of individuals, families, and groups.
Accountability:
9. Take responsibility for appropriate delegation and supervision of others within the current scope of practice and established standards of care.
10. Take responsibility and accountability for personal actions.
Management/Leadership:
11. Collaborate with nursing staff for supervision, delegation and coordination in the management of nursing care.

7
NSG232 Concepts in Nursing IV

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 232. Concepts in Nursing IV (5). Concepts of nursing care for clients with commonly occurring health care concerns: Alterations in cardiac and neurological functioning and multisystem problems including shock and burns. Includes concepts of critical care and emergency/disaster nursing. Uses nursing process format and integrates learning/teaching, psychosocial, diversity/cultural, spiritual, nutritional, pharmacological, management, legal, and ethical aspects. Clinical practicum includes preceptorship experience in well defined practice settings. Use of Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Exit Exam as a progression benchmark and remediation guide. Prerequisite: BIO 205 and NSG 231 and NSG 233. Corequisite: NSG 234 and NSG 235. Two lecture. Nine lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nursing care of the client experiencing critical alterations
2. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in cardiac function
3. Nursing care of the client experiencing alterations in neurologic function
4. Nursing responsibilities in disasters and emergency nursing

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use the nursing process as a framework for care of the criticlly ill patient and for the patient with commonly occuring health care needs and problems. (1-4)
2. Analyze the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, collaborative care, and nursing management of patients with commonly occurring health care disorders. (1-4)
3. Examine ethical, legal, and political issues within the healthcare system. (1-4)
4. Specify pharmacological measures to prevent or minimize complications of selected acute-care disorders. (1-4)
5. Independently provide nursing care for groups of clients with multiple health care needs and problems in complex nursing practice situations. (1-4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Exit Exam.

5
NSG233 Perinatal & Women's Health NSG

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 233. Perinatal and Women's Health Nursing (2). Concepts of nursing care for the preconception, perinatal and postpartum family and neonate. Includes sexually transmitted diseases, men's reproductive and women's health issues. Prerequisite: NSG 132. Corequisite: NSG 231. Two lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nursing care of the childbearing family
a. Preconception
b. Prenatal care
c. Care during labor and birth
d. Neonatal care
e. Postpartum care
2. Nursing care of the childbearing family at risk for complications
a. High risk pregnancy
b. High risk labor and delivery
c. High risk newborn
d. Physical/developmental disorders
e. High risk postpartum
3. Women's health issues
a. Abortions and contraception
b. Cancer
c. Menopause
d. Sexually transmitted diseases
4. Men's reproductive health issues

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze data to individualize the nursing care of women and members of childbearing family. (1-4)
2. Safely prioritize the nursing care for women and members of childbearing family. (1-4)
3. Perform a complete postpartum and newborn assessment. (1c-e, 2b-e)
4. Incorporate therapeutic communication and critical thinking when evaluating the dynamics related to women and the childbearing family. (1-4)
5. Evaluate client's progress toward achievement of expected outcomes and revise the plan of care as needed. (1-4)
6. Apply the therapeutic use of self in nursing practice. (1-4)
7. Modify nursing care for women and members of the childbearing family based on their diversity/culture. (1-4)
8. Use effective communication skills when collaborating with clients, families, peers and other members of the health care team. (1-4)
9. Use the nursing process to identify the learning needs of women and childbearing families. (1-4)
10. Apply the Arizona Board of Nursing Scope of Practice standards when caring for the childbearing family. (1-4)
11. Collaborate with nursing staff to coordinate nursing care for clients. (1-4)

2
NSG234 Psychiatric Mental Health NSG

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 234. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (3). Concepts of nursing care for clients throughout the life span with maladaptive psychosocial and physiological responses related to mental disorders. Uses nursing process format and integrates complex communication techniques, learning/teaching, psychosocial, diversity/cultural, spiritual, nutritional, pharmacological, legal and ethical aspects. Clinical practicum occurs in well-defined settings. Prerequisite: NSG 132. Two lecture. Three lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Psychiatric/mental health nursing standards of care
2. Psychosocial and mental status assessment
3. Nurse-client relationship
a. Therapeutic use of self
b. Complex therapeutic communication techniques
4. Nursing care of clients with selected psychiatric/mental health needs and problems
5. Specialized interventions for clients with psychiatric/mental health needs and problems
6. Legal/ethical aspects related to clients with psychiatric/mental health needs and problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply current psychiatric standards of care, including clinical competence, critical thinking, caring, diversity/culture, effective communication, accountability, and collaborating with the health care team. (1-6)
2. Name components of the mental status assessment and perform a mental status assessment on a client with a psychiatric disorder. (2,3a,3b)
3. Identify the role of a psychiatric nurse and care for selected psychiatric/mental health clients, addressing special needs and problems in a variety of psychiatric settings. (2,3a,3b,4)
4. Identify the role of a psychiatric nurse and care for selected psychiatric/mental health clients, addressing special needs and problems in a variety of psychiatric settings. (3a, 3b, 4-6)
5. Employ specialized interventions for clients with psychiatric/mental health needs and problems in a variety of psychiatric settings. (3a, 3b, 5,6)
6. Practice according to applicable legal/ethical concepts in psychiatric nursing. (3a,3b, 5,6)

3
NSG235 Nursing Management & Leadershp

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 235. Nursing Management and Leadership (2). Exploration of healthcare and professional organizations, current trends in healthcare and effects of the political process on decision making. Emphasis on leadership and management skills required for collaboration with others on the healthcare team and how to incorporate research into an evidence-based practice. Prerequisite: NSG 231. Two lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Licensure and employment
2. Avenues of higher and continuing education
3. Healthcare organizational structures
4. The political process and its impact on healthcare
5. Legal and ethical aspects of healthcare
6. Role of regulatory agencies and nursing organizations
7. Nursing research and evidence-based practice
8. Leadership styles and management skills including conflict management
9. Quality management and risk management
10. Managing change
11. Professional and client advocacy
12. Resource management
13. Professionalism

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the influence of healthcare agencies and professional organizations on nursing practice. (3, 6)
2. Incorporate the principles of leadership and management (supervision, delegation and coordination) in providing nursing care. (8-13)
3. Discuss political, legal and ethical issues related to healthcare and within the various healthcare systems. (3-5)
4. Deliver nursing care utilizing available resources. (12)
5. Incorporate the use of nursing research and evidence-based practice into nursing care. (7, 9, 10)
6. Apply for licensure and employment. (1)
7. Explain the importance of higher, and continuing, education on the advancement of the nursing profession. (2, 13)

2
III.  Related Requirements
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 201. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2201. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 181. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomical terms and homeostasis
2. Cytological and histological anatomy and functions
3. Integumentary system
4. Anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system
5. Axial and appendicular skeleton, joints
6. Anatomy and physiology of the muscular system
7. Gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles
8. Muscle contraction
9. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
10. The central and peripheral nervous systems
11. The automatic nervous system
12. The senses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the parts of a typical cell and describe their function and structure. (1, 2)
2. Identify and describe the four basic tissue types, their anatomy and functions. (1, 2)
3. Describe the anatomy and functions of the integumentary system. (1, 3)
4. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system. (1, 4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy of joints, axial and appendicular skeletal systems. (1, 5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the muscular system. (1, 6)
7. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles. (1, 7)
8. Describe the biological processes involved in muscle contraction. (1, 8) (PBS 1)
9. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. (1, 9)
10. Describe and identify brain and spinal cord anatomy and reflexes. (1, 10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in the nerve impulse. (1, 10, 11)
12. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology autonomic nervous system. (1, 10, 11)
13. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology of the senses. (1, 12) (PBS 2,3)
14. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the human body. (3-12)
15. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-12)
16. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-12) (PBS 2)
17. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (2-12)
18. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-12)

4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 202. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2202. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include reproductive, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. Prerequisite: BIO 201. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands
2. Hormonal actions
3. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system
4. Anatomy and physiology of blood
5. Anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system
6. Anatomy and physiology of the immune system
7. Fetal membranes and blood circulation
8. Anatomy and physiology of the digestive system
9. Metabolism
10. Anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system
11. Blood pressure and flow dynamics
12. Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
13. Ventilation mechanisms and gas transport
14. Anatomy and physiology of the urinary system
15. Urine formation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands. (1)
2. Describe the biological processes involved in hormonal actions. (2)
3. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system. (3)
4. Describe the anatomy and functions of blood. (4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system. (5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the immune system. (6)
7. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of fetal membranes and circulation. (7)
8. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system. (8)
9. Describe the biological processes involved in metabolism. (9)
10. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system. (10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in blood pressure dynamics. (11)
12. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. (12)
13. Describe and identify ventilation mechanisms. (13)
14. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the urinary system. (14)
15. Describe the biological processes involved urine formation. (15)
16. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the body. (1-15) (PBS 1)
17. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-15)
18. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2)
19. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2,3)
20. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-15)

4
BIO205 Microbiology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 205. Microbiology (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2205. Introduction to microorganisms and viruses of medical importance. Chemical and physical methods of microbial control; bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and viral drug therapy; the immune system response to infection; transmission of human disease; and common clinical presentation of various diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 100 or BIO 181, and CHM 138 (Preferred) or CHM 130 or CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Microbial anatomy
2. Bacterial nutrition, metabolism, and physiology
3. Bacterial genetics
4. Physical and chemical control of microorganisms
5. Anti-microbial therapy
6. Basic principles of epidemiology
7. Humoral and Cellular immunity
8. Bacteria of medical importance
9. Viruses of medical importance
10. Fungi and protozoa of medical importance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and describe the principal physical features of bacterial, fungal, and protozoal cells. (1) (PBS 1)
2. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to isolate, cultivate, and identify bacteria. Prepare a written summary of the identification. (2) (PBS 2,3)
3. Describe the method of inheritance in haploid microorganisms, with emphasis on mutation rate. (3) (PBS 2)
4. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to prepare sterile microbiological media and demonstrate the effects of chemical agents on bacterial growth. (4) (PBS 2,3)
5. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to demonstrate the effects of antibiotics on medically important bacteria. (5)
6. Describe the various methods of transmission of human disease from other humans, the environment, and animal vectors.(6)
7. Describe the relationship between the human immune system and resistance to disease. (7)
8. Describe the important clinical features of human diseases due to bacteria. (8) (PBS 1)
9. Describe the principal structural and genetic features of medically important viruses, and their usual clinical presentation. (9) (PBS 1)
10. Describe the important clinical features of human diseases due to fungi and protozoa. (10)

4
.
NSG130 Basic Nutrition for Nurses

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NSG 130. Basic Nutrition for Nurses (1). Introduction to the basic concepts of nutrition. Includes a healthy balanced diet, factors that influence nutrition, and diet therapy for certain disease states. One lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Factors influencing nutrition: culture, religion, socio-economic, fads, superstitions
2. Nutrients
3. Dietary guidelines: Four food groups, food guide pyramid, food labeling, recommended dietary allowances, and dietary reference intakes
4. Nutrition and health: nursing assessment, weight management, and diet therapy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify factors that positively and negatively affect nutrition.
2. Explain the significance of each of the six classes of nutrients.
3. Use established dietary guidelines to promote healthy nutrition.
4. Describe diet therapies used in the treatment of selected diseases or nutritional disorders.
5. Identify nursing actions to help clients achieve their nutritional goals.

1
OR NTR135 Human Nutrition

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
NTR 135. Human Nutrition (3). Principles of human nutrition including nutrient sources and physiological needs throughout the life cycle. Emphasis on role of nutrition in health and disease. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nutrition and food and their relation to health
2. Food Nutrients
a. Carbohydrates
b. Fat
c. Proteins
d. Fat soluble vitamins
e. Water soluble vitamins
f. Minerals
g. Water
3. Energy metabolism
4. Digestion, absorption and metabolism
5. Ecology of food
6. Nutrition and the life cycle
7. Diet in disease

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify, value, and use a nutritional intake of food.
2. To recognize the importance of sound nutritional habits during the human life cycle.
3. Understand the interrelationships among the nutrients and their influence on human nutrition.
4. Apply sound nutrition concepts to critical periods throughout the life cycle.
5. Understand the influence of nutrition on the special health problems of an individual.
6. Relate nutrition to specific diseases and the importance of special diets in the management of those diseases.
7. Evaluate current nutrition information for reliability and usefulness.

3
PRE-ENTRY Requirements (Must complete prior to applying to Nursing Program)
AHS114 Nursing Assistant

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AHS 114. Nursing Assistant (5). Preparation for the role of a nursing assistant in a long term care facility. Basic nursing assistant skills and emergency procedures; client needs and rights; written and verbal communication; ethical and legal aspects; safety and infection control. Includes classroom and clinical instruction. Application required with the following documentation: Skin test or chest X-ray negative for TB, or equivalent within 12 months; current DPS fingerprint clearance card and CPR for the Healthcare Provider. Must be at least 16 years old. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Communication, interpersonal skills and documentation
2. Infection control
3. Safety and emergency procedures
4. Client independence
5. Client rights
6. Abuse, mistreatment and neglect
7. Basic nursing assistant skills
8. Age specific mental health and social service needs
9. Cognitively impaired client care
10. Basic restorative care skills
11. Role as a health care team member
12. Legal aspects of nursing assistant practice
13. Body structure and common diseases

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply basic nursing assistant skills safely. (7, 10)
2. Use restorative care skills and emergency procedures safely. (3,10)
3. Utilize infection control principles and procedures. (2)
4. Identify and report changes in the client's condition. (1, 3, 6, 8, 9,13)
5. Describe and protect client rights. (5,6)
6. Assist and promote client independence. (4,10)
7. Apply the legal and ethical aspects of the nursing assistant role. (5,6,11,12)
8. Employ effective written and verbal communication skills. (1,7,9)
9. Adapt to individual client behaviors and needs. (1,3,7-10)
10. Adapt to the unique needs of the client with cognitive impairment. (9)
11. Describe the role of the nursing assistant as a member of the health care team. (11, 12)
12. Explain basic body structure and function. (13)
13. Identify the signs and symptoms of common diseases. (13)

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BIO181 General Biology I  1

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 181. General Biology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1181. Biological principles emphasizing structure and function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of biological systems. Secondary school chemistry strongly recommended. Primarily for biology majors and preprofessional students in health-related fields. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific Method
2. Basic chemistry and biological macromolecules
3. Organization of cells
4. Energy and Enzymes
5. Photosynthesis
6. Cellular respiration
7. Cell division
8. Genetics
9. Gene expression and regulation
10. Gene technology
11. Data collection and analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the scientific method in problem solving (1) (PBS 1,3)
2. Describe the basic chemistry and chemical interactions of life (2)
3. Describe the structure and function of the four main types of biological macromolecules (2)
4. Identify and describe the structure and function of the parts of typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells (3)
5. Describe the properties of enzymes and their relation to cellular metabolism (4)
6. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of photosynthesis (5)
7. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of cellular respiration (6)
8. Describe the biological processes of cell division including the cell cycle, mitosis, and meiosis (7)
9. Solve mendelian and nonmendelian genetics problems (8) (PBS 2)
10. Describe the fundamental processes of gene expression and control of gene expression (9)
11. Describe basic genetic engineering techniques and tools including recombinant DNA techniques and Polymerase Chain Reaction (10)
12. Conduct experiments, observe biological phenomena, and record information in a laboratory notebook (11)

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BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 201. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2201. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 181. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomical terms and homeostasis
2. Cytological and histological anatomy and functions
3. Integumentary system
4. Anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system
5. Axial and appendicular skeleton, joints
6. Anatomy and physiology of the muscular system
7. Gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles
8. Muscle contraction
9. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
10. The central and peripheral nervous systems
11. The automatic nervous system
12. The senses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the parts of a typical cell and describe their function and structure. (1, 2)
2. Identify and describe the four basic tissue types, their anatomy and functions. (1, 2)
3. Describe the anatomy and functions of the integumentary system. (1, 3)
4. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system. (1, 4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy of joints, axial and appendicular skeletal systems. (1, 5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the muscular system. (1, 6)
7. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles. (1, 7)
8. Describe the biological processes involved in muscle contraction. (1, 8) (PBS 1)
9. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. (1, 9)
10. Describe and identify brain and spinal cord anatomy and reflexes. (1, 10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in the nerve impulse. (1, 10, 11)
12. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology autonomic nervous system. (1, 10, 11)
13. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology of the senses. (1, 12) (PBS 2,3)
14. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the human body. (3-12)
15. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-12)
16. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-12) (PBS 2)
17. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (2-12)
18. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-12)

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ENG101 College Composition I  2

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
MAT142 College Mathematics  3

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 142. College Mathematics (3). Survey of mathematical topics and applications. Includes statistics, probability, exponential functions, finance, dimensional analysis and other selected discrete math topics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Algebraic Models of Growth and Decay
2. Mathematics of Personal Finance
3. Counting and Probability
4. Descriptive Statistics and the Normal Distribution
5. Dimensional Analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create and apply linear, quadratic and exponential models. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Apply the mathematics of personal finance, including compound interest, annuities, and amortized loans. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Apply the basic rules of counting: fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply basic rules of probability including compound events, conditional probability, and expected value to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Calculate and interpret graphical and numerical summaries of data, including measures of central tendency and dispersion. (4) (QL 1-4)
6. Use the basic properties of the Normal curve to solve applied problems. (4) (QL 1-4)
7. Use dimensional analysis to make conversions with metric and U.S. measurement systems. (5) (QL 1-4)

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1 - Or BIO 156
2 - Or ENG 103
3 - Or higher level math course

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