Associate of Applied Science - Paralegal Studies    Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Instructional Specialist Holly Molina (928) 776-2295
Program Director Michael Davis (928) 717-7938
Instructional Specialist Mitzi Martin (928) 776-2157
Dean Jill Fitzgerald (928) 776-2277

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Paralegal Studies

The Paralegal Studies program is designed to prepare students for positions as paralegals in the legal and business fields. Individuals who are already employed in the legal field and seeking advancement opportunities may also select this program of study. Paralegals work under the supervision of an attorney and their work includes preparing legal documents, researching and compiling information, and communicating with clients. Excellent written and oral communication skills, as well as computer literacy skills, are important to the paralegal.

Note: This degree is primarily designed to prepare students for direct employment. Students who are preparing to transfer to a baccalaureate degree-granting institution for an advanced degree in paralegal studies should contact an academic advisor for assistance in establishing an educational plan.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Paralegal Studies Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Interview witnesses and interact with clients, conduct investigative work, manage cases, conduct legal research, draft legal pleadings, prepare legal documents, and apply knowledge of legal substance and procedures in areas of contract law, real estate law, corporate law, wills, trusts, and probate law, litigation, family law, and criminal law.  (LAW 100, 104, 201, 202, 203, 206, 208, 215, 216, 220, 221, 298)
  2. Apply written oral and interpersonal skills in the legal and business settings. (LAW 215, 216, 220, 221)
  3. Identify and evaluate technology needs and apply and adapt required skills to the rapidly changing legal and business community. (LAW 102)
  4. Proficiently use word processing software and identify and adapt to different types of computer applications. (CSA 140, LAW 102)
  5. Identify ethical issues and apply the values of professional responsibility.  (LAW 101)

 

 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition or Technical Writing AND Business English (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG136 Technical Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 136. Technical Writing (3). Practical writing for the world of work, from business correspondence to technical reports. Prerequisite: ENG 100 or COM 135 or minimum COMPASS writing score of 80. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to course
a. Nature of technical writing
b. Special purposes of technical writing
c. Qualities of technical writing
d. Connotation/denotation
e. Sentence variety
2. Technical letter writing
a. Letters of complaint/compliment
b. Letters seeking information
c. Letters issuing instructions
d. Memos
3. Technical reports
a. Accident reports
b. Progress reports
c. Periodic reports
d. Recommendation reports
e. Examination reports
4. Logical patterns of technical writing
a. Definition
b. Description
c. Process description
d. Instructions
5. Formal technical report (must complete to pass course)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Study and practice writing skills for the world of work.
2. Study and write a variety of job-related letters, periodic reports and technical reports.

3
BSA105 Business English

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BSA 105. Business English (3). Developing or reviewing good language skills for occupational purposes. Covers spelling, punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure and word usage. Utilizes business-oriented materials. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Basic language skills
a. Grammar
b. Punctuation
c. Word usage
d. Numbers in business
2. Business vocabulary
a. Spelling
b. Definitions
3. Business correspondence
a. Stationery
b. Parts of a business letter
c. Arrangements
d. Message

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define more than 100 business terms.
2. Master a spelling list emphasizing business terms.
3. Demonstrate basic grammar and punctuation skills.
4. Identify the parts of a business letter and envelope.
5. Select appropriate salutations and closings.
6. Demonstrate techniques of paragraphing a business letter.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
 
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Quantitative Literacy Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the quantitative literacy component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
MAT100 Technical Mathematics   3
MAT122 Intermediate Algebra   3
MAT142 College Mathematics   3
MAT152 College Algebra   3
MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I   3
MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II   3
MAT167 Elementary Statistics   3
MAT172 Finite Mathematics   3
MAT183 Trigonometry   2
MAT187 Precalculus   5
MAT212 Survey of Calculus   3
MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I   5
MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II   5
MAT241 Calculus III   4
MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
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Critical Thinking (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
 
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Physical & Biological Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biological science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AGS103 Plant Biology   4
BIO100 Biology Concepts   4
BIO103 Plant Biology   4
BIO105 Environmental Biology   4
BIO107 Introduction to Biotechnology   4
BIO108 Concepts in Plant Biology   4
BIO109 Natural History Southwest   4
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health   4
BIO160 Intro Human Anat & Physiology   4
BIO181 General Biology I   4
BIO182 General Biology II   4
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I   4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II   4
BIO205 Microbiology   4
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry   4
CHM138 Chemistry for Allied Health   5
CHM151 General Chemistry I   5
CHM152 General Chemistry II   5
CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I   4
CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab   1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II   4
CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab   1
ENV105 Environmental Biology   4
ENV110 Environmental Geology   4
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography   4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology   4
GLG100 Concepts in Basic Geology   2
GLG101 Intro to Geology I   4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II   4
GLG110 Environmental Geology   4
GLG116 Geology Verde Valley   2
GLG117 Implications Plate Tectonics   2
GLG118 Evolution of Basin and Range   2
GLG119 Geology of Grand Canyon   2
GLG120 Geology of Northern Arizona   2
GLG121 Volcanoes/Earthquakes N AZ   2
GLG122 Geology of Death Valley   2
GLG123 Geology of Bryce and Zion   2
GLG124 Geology of the Prescott Region   2
PHY100 Intro to Astronomy   4
PHY111 General Physics I   4
PHY112 General Physics II   4
PHY140 The Physical World   4
PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I   5
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II   5
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Behavioral OR Social Science (3 credits)
Choose one course from either list
 
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Behavioral Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152 Personal Health & Wellness   3
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
OR
 
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Social Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcraft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
ECN235 Principles of Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Paralegal Studies Requirements
CSA140 Microsoft Word

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CSA 140. Microsoft Word (2). Practical application of Microsoft Office Word using the Windows Operating System. Two lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Document creation, formatting and editing
2. Headers, footers, page numbers, Styles and Themes
3. Templates, complex tables, charts and graphics
4. Linking to other documents
5. WordArt, textboxes, pull quotes and Smart Art
6. Forms, form letters and mail merge
7. Footnotes, endnotes, outlines, table of contents and indexes

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create documents using basic and advanced formatting. (1-8)
2. Create templates, merged documents and forms. (3,5)
3. Create documents with WordArt, Smart Art, Graphics, Tables and charts, (3-4)
4. Create research papers using Microsoft Word. (1,2,7)

2
LAW100 Intro to Paralegal Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 100. Introduction to Paralegal Studies (3). Introduction to the role of the paralegal in the legal system, including the federal and state court systems, ethics, regulation and professional responsibility, legal analysis, research and basic legal concepts. Includes professional development and job search strategies. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to the paralegal profession
a. History
b. Education
c. Skills
2. Careers in the legal community
3. The regulation of legal professionals
4. Ethics and professional responsibility
5. Introduction to law
a. Sources
b. Court system and alternative dispute resolution
c. Fundamental legal concepts
6. Civil and criminal litigation and procedures
7. Legal analysis and writing
8. Legal research

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the American judicial system and the responsibilities of the various court systems.
2. Distinguish between civil and criminal litigation, and describe the stages of litigation.
3. Describe and explain basic concepts of law.
4. Apply legal analysis to the briefing of cases and problem solving.
5. Define the issues of the paralegal profession, and discuss professional development and job search strategies.
6. Apply principles of ethics and professional responsibility to specific scenarios.

3
LAW101 Legal Ethics & Prof Respnsblty

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 101. Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility (1). State and national ethical codes and rules of professional responsibility, ethical dilemmas and methods for researching answers, professionalism, and the unauthorized practice of law. One lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Codes of ethics and rules of professional responsibility
2. Regulation of lawyers and non-lawyers
3. Ethical dilemmas
4. Methods for researching answers to ethical dilemmas
5. Professionalism
6. Unauthorized practice of law

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify state and national codes of ethics and rules of professional responsibility.
2 Delineate regulations pertaining to lawyers and non-lawyers.
3. Describe ethical dilemmas.
4. Research answers to ethical dilemmas.
5. Identify best practices representing professionalism.
6. Analyze statutes and rules relating to the unauthorized practice of law.

1
LAW102 Legal Computer Applications

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 102. Legal Computer Applications (3). Introduction to, and advanced application of, computer software applications used in a law office and the business community. Includes computer research tools, e-mail, application of general office management software to the legal environment, ethical considerations, and law office practice concepts, time and billing, calendaring, and docket control, case management, document management, litigation support, computer research tools, and ethical considerations.. Prerequisite: CSA 140. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Computer hardware and software; concepts of law office management
2. Software programs for law office management including computer research, e-mail, and application of general office management software to the legal environment
3. WESTLAW and Internet research
4. Complex legal documents
5. The law office and law practice of the 21st century
6. Ethical considerations and basic law office practice concepts
7. Electronic presentation software
8. Software programs for time and billing, calendaring and docket control, case management, document management, litigation support, general office management, and computer research tools, Westlaw, and internet research

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the use of technology in the practice of law and in the management of the law office. (1-5,7)
2. Identify a variety of computer tools available to assist the legal professional in the performance of daily tasks. (1-3,5,7)
3. Identify, explain and prepare research strategies in the use of WESTLAW and Internet research. (3)
4. Describe the application of general office management software packages to the legal environment (ex: word processing, database management, spreadsheets, and presentation software) and prepare complex legal documents. (2,4,7)
5. Use legal software applications packages:
a. Standard Internet browser to conduct Internet research. (2,3)
b. WESTLAW (legal research). (2,3).
c. General office management software (ex: word processing, database management, spreadsheets, presentation software. (1,2,4,5,7)
d. Other legal-specific software as appropriate and available. (2,3,4,5)
6. Find, evaluate and summarize new and emerging software and hardware technologies for the law office. (2,3,5)
7. Identify and explain ethical concerns relating to technology and the practice of law. (6)
8. Design an electronic slideshow using presentation software. (7)
9. Manage information by applying legal software applications packages to law office situations, which may include: Timeslips or Verdict software; Amicus Attorney or Abacus software; Summation Blaze, InData, Trial Director, or DiscoverFY software; PCLaw; and other legal-specific software as appropriate and available. (8)

3
LAW104 Wills, Trusts and Probate

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 104. Wills, Trusts and Probate (3). Critical issues, roles, and legal requirements in estate administration and pleadings. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Terminology, definitions, and law associated with wills, trusts, estate administration
2. Wills and trusts
3. Estate administration
4. Personal representatives, fiduciaries and trustees
5. Arizona probate law

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the law regarding will and trust drafting. (1,2)
2. Identify the laws of intestate succession. (3)
3. Identify the basic functions of the participants in estate administration. (3)
4. Prepare the pleadings for an informal probate. (3)
5. Compare the responsibilities and liabilities of personal representatives, fiduciaries and trustees. (4)
6. Identify the required pleadings in a formal probate. (5)

3
LAW201 Criminal Law and Procedure

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 201. Criminal Law and Procedure (2). Fundamentals of criminal law and examination of the criminal court system, criminal investigation and prosecution, rules of evidence, and trial preparation and procedures. Two lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Federal and state court system
2. Terminology
3. Constitutional protections
4. Arrest
5. Evidence
6. Confessions and admissions
7. Trial preparation and procedures

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Outline state and federal criminal court systems, the jurisdiction of courts and of law enforcement agencies. (1)
2. Identify and apply the elements of common law and Arizona crimes. (1,2)
3. Explain criminal trial procedure from grand jury through appeal. (1,2)
4 Describe the roles of the police, prosecutors, defense attorney, judges and paralegals in the criminal justice system. (4-6)
5. Define and use legal terminology related to criminal law. (2,4,5)
6 Explain and define the role of the Bill of Rights in criminal litigation. (3)

2
LAW202 Real Estate Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 202. Real Estate Law (3). Overview of legal requirements and the documents and forms relating to real property transactions. Real estate purchase and sale, various methods of holding title to real property, mortgages, lease agreements, liens and declarations of homestead. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to law and legal systems
2. Land/property and related concerns
3. Estates in land and ways of holding title
4. Encumbrances
5. Conveyances
6. Legal descriptions
7. Leases
8. Contracts
9. Title defects and resolutions
10. Mortgages and deeds of trust

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use the terminology that applies to real estate law. (1,2,6)
2. Describe ways of holding title, encumbrances and conveyances. (3-5)
3. Draft real estate documents for a transfer of real property. (7-10)
4. Identify title defects and resolutions. (9)
5. Develop a real estate notebook to aid in undertaking a real estate transaction. (6-10)
6. Analyze legal concepts and apply them to a real estate transaction. (2,6)
7. Analyze how real estate law impacts other areas of law. (1,2)

3
LAW203 Family Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 203. Family Law (3). Legal aspects of domestic matters and family relationships. Emphasis on dissolution of marriage, community property, child custody, child support and support calculations, adoptions, guardianships, state involvement in family and parent-child relationships, and statutes relating to families and family relationships. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Legal terminology
2. Dissolution of marriage pleadings and procedure
3. Divorce process, statutes and forms applicable to dissolution of marriage
4. Annulment
5. Spousal support
6. Child custody, visitation and parenting time; child support and support calculations
7. Community property settlement
8. Adoption, termination of parent/child relationship, guardianship, conservatorship
9. Family Crimes
10. Family health/welfare issues
11. Children: delinquency and dependency proceedings

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define and use legal terminology related to domestic relations and family law. (1)
2. Conduct initial client interviews. (3)
3. Prepare dissolution pleadings from petition through decree. (1-3)
4. Explain the procedural process of a dissolution from filing to judgement. (2)
5. Differentiate between legal separation, dissolution and annulment. (4-6)
6. Distinguish between community property and separate property. (1,7)
7. Draft forms relating to conservatorship, guardianship, adoption and parental terminations, health care and powers of attorney. (1,8,10)
8. Relate the role, activities, and process of state in family and family relationships. (9-11)

3
LAW206 Contracts

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 206. Contracts (2). Legal requirements of corporations, partnerships, LLCs, and sole proprietorships. Two lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Corporate law
2. Partnerships, limited partnerships, LLCs
3. Uniform Partnership Act, Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act
4. Sole proprietorships
5. Agency law
6. Ethical concerns

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply business organization information and legalities. (1,2,3,4,5)
2. Analyze cases, statutes and uniform acts incorporate, partnership, LLC, sole proprietorship, and other business organizational structures. (1,2,3,4,5)
3. Identify concepts of agency law. (5)
4. Identify and explain ethical concerns relating to different business organizational structures. (6)

2
LAW208 Business Organizations

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 208. Business Organizations (2). General principles of the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, and sales. Two lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contract case and statutory law
2. Restatement of contracts
3. Contract terminology
4. Parole evidence rule
5. Statute of frauds
6. Uniform Commercial Code as it relates to sales, negotiable instruments and banking
7. Ethical considerations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain and apply the basics of contract formation, execution, breach and remedies. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
2. Define contract terminology. (3)
3. Explain the parole evidence rule and statute of frauds. (1,3, 4,5)
4. Analyze cases in contract law. (1)
5. Describe the functions of the Uniform Commercial Code in the areas of sales, negotiable instruments and banking. (6)
6. Identify and explain ethical concerns relating to contract law. (7)

2
LAW215 Legal Research and Writing I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 215. Legal Research & Writing I (4) (Fall). Principles and techniques for conducting legal research. Emphasis on sources of law, utilization of primary and secondary sources, and case briefing. Extensive practice in writing research memoranda. Prerequisite: BSA 105 and (ENG 101 or ENG 103 or ENG 136). Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Grammar and sentence structure
2. Role of the paralegal in conducting legal research
3. Techniques of legal research
4. Statutes, digests, reporters, legal periodicals, and other sources
5. Facts and issues in legal analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify parts of a sentence and use correct grammar in legal writing. (1,8)
2. Describe the role of the paralegal in conducting legal research and in legal writing. (2)
3. Research the law using appropriate legal resources and techniques. (3,4)
4. Locate federal, state and local statutes, ordinances, acts, and cases. (3,4)
5. Summarize, outline and explain the relevant facts and legal issues involved in a legal problem. (5)
6. Cite cases using Blue Book and/or ALWD citation form. (6)
7. Apply legal analysis in the writing process. (7,8)
8. Write legal memoranda. (8)
9. Identify and explain ethical concerns relating to legal research and writing. (9)

4
LAW216 Legal Research and Writing II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 216. Legal Research and Writing II (4) (Spring). Application of research and writing skills in responding to complex legal issues and preparing complex legal documents. Prerequisite: LAW 215. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Legal research
2. Federal, state and local statutes, ordinances, acts, court rules and case law
3. Blue Book and/or ALWD citation form
4. Research analysis and writing strategy
5. Complex legal documents
6. Computer-assisted legal research
7. Ethical concerns relating to legal research and writing

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Locate and apply federal, state and local statutes, ordinances and acts, court rules, and case law in the preparation of complex legal documents. (1,2,4-6)
2. Summarize and explain relevant facts and legal issues involved in complex legal problems. (4,5)
3. Cite relevant authority using Blue Book and/or ALWD citation form. (3)
4. Apply research analysis and develop strategies in the legal writing process. (1,2,4-6)
5. Draft complex legal documents. (1-6)
6. Use computer-assisted legal research. (6)
7. Identify and explain ethical concerns relating to legal research and writing. (7)

4
LAW220 Civil Tort Litigation I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 220. Civil Tort Litigation I (3) (Fall). Principles and procedures of civil litigation. Jurisdiction and venue, parties to action, and pleadings. Introduction to drafting of documents required from inception of civil action through the pleading stage, up to trial. Prerequisite: BSA 105 and CSA 140 and LAW 100 and (ENG 101 or ENG 103 or ENG 136). Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Courts and court systems
2. Jurisdiction and venue
3. Parties to the actions
4. Client and witness interviewing
5. File organization and document control
6. Demand letters and settlement
7. Preparation of pleadings including complaints, summons, certificates, answers and disclosure statements
8. Elements of basic negligence actions including duty, breach, causation, damages, defenses, comparative negligence, and immunities
9. Terminology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Outline the litigation process from client interview through the pleading stage. (1-7)
2. Interview clients and witnesses. (4)
3. Draft basic litigation documents. (7)
4. Describe the role of the paralegal in the litigation process. (1-7)
5. Define legal terminology related to personal injury litigation. (9)
6. Describe the key components of Arizona law related to personal injury litigation. (8)

3
LAW221 Civil Tort Litigation II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 221. Civil Tort Litigation II (3) (Spring). Study of the civil litigation process. Includes trial preparation, trial, evidence, and appeal. Prerequisite: LAW 220. Two lecture. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Preparation of discovery and pretrial documents including interrogatories, requests for admission and subpoenas
2. Depositions
3. Summary judgments
4. Arbitration
5. Pretrial motions
6. Preparation of witnesses
7. Trial procedures including jury selection, courtroom observations, trial notebooks, note taking, daily trial recapitulation, demonstrative exhibit, and witnesses
8. Post trial and appellate procedures
9. Torts including abuse of process, product liability, slander/libel, employment torts, malpractice, fraud/misrepresentation, and emotional distress
10. Terminology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Outline the litigation process from pleading state through post trial. (1-8, 10)
2. Prepare a trial notebook. (1-8)
3. Apply the Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure. (1-8)
4. Assist in the process of witness preparation. (6)
5. Draft discovery and trial pleadings. (1)
6. Describe the role of the paralegal in the litigation process. (1-7, 10)
7. Identify elements of different tort causes for action. (9, 10)

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LAW296 Internship: Paralegal Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

LAW 296. Internship: Paralegal Studies (3). Supervised field experience with businesses, corporations, government agencies, schools and community organizations to expand career interests and apply subject knowledge relevant to the workplace. Individualized internship placements to develop personal and professional skills, including professional ethics, leadership, and civic responsibility. Prerequisite: Student must have a GPA of 2.0; have completed specific degree requirements as required by the program; and have completed the internship application process. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.] S/U grading only.


COURSE CONTENT:

1. Organizational overview of assigned placement
2. Integration of job description and organization's requirements
3. Elements of documentation of experience
4. Planning and time management
5. Professional, legal, and ethical issues
6. Communication, critical thinking, and problem solving
7. Specialized equipment, tools, and software required in the placement

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Exhibit appropriate workplace behaviors and professional ethics.
2. Apply discipline specific knowledge and skills in the professional workplace.
3. Define and utilize technical terms in written and oral communications.
4. Use critical thinking, problem solving, ethical awareness, and effective writing
5. Interpret written and oral instructions.
6. Initiate and complete assigned responsibilities.
7. Maintain documentation required to comply with government employer or nonprofit agency regulations.
8. Use specialized equipment, software, and tools as required.
9. Analyze and interpret data for specified reports.
10. Identify opportunities for improvement in process and documentation related to the workplace.
11. Articulate job description and position in assigned organization.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Record of Student Internship workplace hours.
2. Individual Education Plan (IEP) as approved by supervision faculty.
3. A daily journal, or work log of tasks, including dates, descriptive comments, problems and solutions.
4. A reflective paper or project as specified by the supervision faculty.
5. A minimum of two evaluations by the workplace employer or supervisor.
6. Student's self-evaluation of experience.

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LAW298 Special Legal Topics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
LAW 298. Special Legal Topics (2). Introduction to a special legal topic and the role of the paralegal in the critical issues and requirements of the legal specialty area. The legal topic will change each semester. Prerequisite: LAW 100 and either ENG 101 or ENG 103. Two lecture. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Substantive law on the special legal topic
2. Role of paralegal in the specialized legal area
3. Pleadings, correspondence, documents in the specialized legal area
4. Research analysis of critical issues in the specialized legal area

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the legal sources regarding the special legal topic. (1)
2. Identify the duties required of a paralegal in the specialized legal area. (2)
3. Analyze and apply current case law to the specialized legal area in pleadings and legal memoranda. (3)
4. Conduct legal and factual research in the legal specialty area. (4)

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