Associate of Applied Science - Radiologic Technology Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Program Director Rich Leclair (928) 771-4866
Professor Steve Hayes (928) 717-7108
Instructional Specialist Daintry Donovan (928) 776-2078
Dean Scott Farnsworth (928) 776-2234

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Radiologic Technology

The Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technology prepares students for entry level positions as radiographers. The program is designed in accordance with the Radiography Curriculum established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists and consists of classroom and laboratory instruction integrated with hands-on experience in a clinical setting.

Note: There is a special admission process for this program and prospective students should contact an academic advisor or visit the Yavapai College website for detailed information.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Radiologic Technology Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Perform diagnostic imaging procedures. (All courses within the program)
  2. Exhibit prudent judgment in administering ionizing radiation to produce diagnostic images.  (All courses within the program)
  3. Provide optimum patient care in a society that is becoming increasingly diverse and experiencing generational, cultural and ethnic shifts. (RAD 100, RAD 160, RAD 170, RAD 180, RAD 200, RAD 240, RAD 280)
  4. Work with other members of the health care organization in a team relationship. (RAD 100, RAD 160, RAD 180, RAD 200, RAD 240, RAD 280)
  5. Explain the intricacies associated with providing direct patient care in today's health care setting. (RAD 100, RAD 170)
  6. Use modern technologies to research and retrieve information, weigh and discriminate between sources of information, and take actions based upon the acquisition of new information and knowledge. (RAD 120, RAD 135, RAD 140, RAD 150, RAD 160, RAD 180, RAD 200, RAD 240, RAD 260, RAD 280) 
  7. Perform stewardship over the security and confidentiality associated with patient medical information. (RAD 100, RAD 160, RAD 180, RAD 200, RAD 240, RAD 280)
  8. Promote career-long learning, where the radiographer assumes the role of student and that of teacher.  (RAD 100, RAD 160, RAD 180, RAD 200, RAD 240, RAD 280)
  9. Show compliance with the requirements for primary certification of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) including the ARRT Rules and Regulations, the ARRT Standards of Ethics and competency in didactic coursework and an ARRT-specified list of clinical procedures. (All courses within the program)
 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT152 College Algebra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 152. College Algebra (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1151. Modeling of applications using linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Introduction to solving systems of equations using matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear Functions
2. Quadratic and other nonlinear functions
3. Exponential and logarithmic functions
4. Polynomial functions
5. Systems of equations and matrices
6. Technology in mathematics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use technology to recognize trends in data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL1-4)
2. Create suitable functions that model data using technology. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-3)
3. Analyze an application using a function developed from data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-4)
4. Add, subtract and multiply matrices in the context of an application. (5,6) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Solve a system of equations using matrices and technology. (5,6) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT167 Elementary Statistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 167. Elementary Statistics (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1160. Statistical tools and techniques used in research and general applications. Description of sample data, probability and probability distributions, point and interval estimates of population parameters, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 142 or 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Descriptive statistics
2. Probability
3. Normal distribution
4. Research design
5. Sampling strategies
6. Confidence intervals
7. Hypotheses testing of one population
8. Hypothesis testing of two population
9. Tests of categorical data
10. Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Tables
11. Regression and correlation
12. Statistics technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use both numerical and graphical methods to describe data. (1) (QL 1,3)
2. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variability. (1) (QL 1-3)
3. Compute probabilities for both simple and compound events. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply the normal distribution to probability problems and estimation of population parameters. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Critique the research methods of others, and use research methodology. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
6. Produce representative random samples. (5) (QL 1,4)
7. Calculate and interpret confidence intervals as estimates of population parameters. (6) (QL 1-4)
8. Perform hypothesis tests about means and other parameters from large and small samples using one and multiple sample methods. (7,8) (QL 1-4)
9. Test hypothesis about categorical data. (9) (QL 1-4)
10. Recognize appropriate use of Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Table tests. (10) (QL 1-3)
11. Use regression and correlation to test hypothesis and create models for bivariate data. (11) (QL 1-4)
12. Use both hand-held calculators and desktop computers to perform statistical analysis. (12) (QL 1)

3
OR MAT172 Finite Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 172. Finite Mathematics (3). Various analytic methods employed in business, social and life sciences with an emphasis on applications. Topics include algebra review, linear programming, matrix operations, linear systems of equations, set theory, counting, probability and statistics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear functions and their graphs
2. Matrices
3. Linear systems of equations
4. Linear programming
5. Set theory
6. Counting techniques
7. Probability theory
8. Statistics
9. Finance problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform elementary matrix operations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion. (2) (QL 1-3)
2. Solve n-by-m linear systems of equations using elementary row operations. (1,3) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Solve linear programming problems by graphical and algebraic techniques. (1,4) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Perform the basic operations of union, intersection and complement on sets. (5) (QL 1)
5. Use Venn diagrams, combinations and permutations in applications involving counting. (6) (QL 1)
6. Evaluate probabilities of simple, compound, independent and dependent events. (7) (QL 1-4)
7. Compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a collection of statistical data. (8) (QL 1-4)
8. Apply the theory of normal and binomial probability distributions to statistics problems. (8) (QL 1-3)
9. Compute the present value of an annuity, interest on mortgages, and cash flow. (9) (QL 1,2,4)

3
OR MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

5
OR MAT212 Survey of Calculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 212. Survey of Calculus (3). Introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, life, and social sciences. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Limits and continuity
2. Derivatives
3. The laws of differentiation
4. Integration
5. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Evaluate limits. (1) (QL 1-4)
3. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,4)
4. Determine maxima and minima of functions by applying differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,2)
5. Use calculus to analyze and graph functions. (2,5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (4,5) (QL 1,4)

3
OR MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHI 204. Ethical Issues in Health Care (3). Study of selected moral theories and principles with emphasis on application to ethical issues in health care. Integrates values exploration and moral reasoning and decision making. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The nature of values and ethics
2. Virtue theory
3. Utilitarianism
4. Deontology
5. Ethical principles emphasized in health care
6. Development of moral reasoning skills
7. Logical fallacies
8. Application of theories, principles and reasoning skills to selected ethical issues in health care

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Gather, interpret, and evaluate evidence and to use it in both the argumentative mode and in the fair-minded, empathetic mode. (8) (CT 2)
2. Develop skill in synthesizing information and making connections independently. (6) (CT 1)
3. Develop awareness of assumptions and unexamined ideas and their alternatives. (1) (CT 3)
4. Recognize of the role of culture in values development, and the impact of values on moral reasoning and decision-making. (6) (CT 3)
5. Examine, and to analyze critically, ethical dilemmas in health care. (6) (CT 4)
6. Identify, interpret, evaluate, and synthesize insights from various conceptual frameworks and alternative paradigms for moral reasoning and decision-making. (1-4) (CT 2)
7. Apply moral theories and principles in the development of moral reasoning and decision-making. (1-4, 8) (CT 4)
8. Produce thoughtful and precise writing, critical reading, rational and factual speaking and independent thinking. (8) (CT 4)
9. Utilize critical thinking skills, including the reasoned use of evidence. (6) (CT 4)
10. Recognize that curiosity, rather than close-minded or self-serving attitudes, is essential to the development of moral reasoning and decision-making skills. (8) (CT 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 201. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2201. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 181. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomical terms and homeostasis
2. Cytological and histological anatomy and functions
3. Integumentary system
4. Anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system
5. Axial and appendicular skeleton, joints
6. Anatomy and physiology of the muscular system
7. Gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles
8. Muscle contraction
9. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
10. The central and peripheral nervous systems
11. The automatic nervous system
12. The senses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the parts of a typical cell and describe their function and structure. (1, 2)
2. Identify and describe the four basic tissue types, their anatomy and functions. (1, 2)
3. Describe the anatomy and functions of the integumentary system. (1, 3)
4. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system. (1, 4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy of joints, axial and appendicular skeletal systems. (1, 5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the muscular system. (1, 6)
7. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles. (1, 7)
8. Describe the biological processes involved in muscle contraction. (1, 8) (PBS 1)
9. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. (1, 9)
10. Describe and identify brain and spinal cord anatomy and reflexes. (1, 10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in the nerve impulse. (1, 10, 11)
12. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology autonomic nervous system. (1, 10, 11)
13. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology of the senses. (1, 12) (PBS 2,3)
14. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the human body. (3-12)
15. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-12)
16. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-12) (PBS 2)
17. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (2-12)
18. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-12)

4
       2.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
PSY245 Human Growth and Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 245. Human Growth and Development (3). Study of physical, intellectual, moral, emotional, personality, and social development of the human being, beginning with conception and continuing through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, and dying. Emphasis on quantitative and qualitative ways people change throughout the life span and factors which contribute to human diversity as well as to individual uniqueness. Research methods appropriate to the study of human development are also considered. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The scientific study of human growth and development across the life span from both ethological/biological ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") perspectives
2. Theories of cognitive development across the life span
3. Theories of social-emotional development across the life span

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify current and historical scientific approaches to research in human development. (BS 2,4)
2. Analyze biological theories of development.
3. Analyze theories of cognitive development. (BS 1)
4. Analyze theories of emotional development.
5. Analyze theories of social development. (BS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
II.  Radiologic Technology Requirements
RAD100 Foundations Radiologic Science

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 100. Foundations of Radiologic Science (2). Foundations in radiography and the practitioner's role in the health care delivery system. Includes an examination of the healthcare establishment, radiography education and related organizational topics, ethical and legal considerations, basic radiation protection and patient care principles. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program. Reading Proficiency. Corequisite: RAD 110 and RAD 120 and RAD 170. Two lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Health science professions
2. The health care environment
3. Hospital organization
4. Radiology organization
5. Accreditation
6. Regulatory agencies
7. Professional credentialing and organizations
8. Professional development and advancement
9. Ethics & ethical behavior
10. Ethical issues in healthcare
11. Legal issues
12. Patient consent
13. Radiation protection

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify health science professions and describe their relationship to each other in the delivery of patient care. (1)
2. Identify various settings in health care delivery. (2)
3. Describe relationships and interdependencies of departments within a healthcare institution. (3)
4. Discuss the responsibilities and relationships of all personnel in the radiology department. (4)
5. Differentiate between programmatic and institutional accreditation. (5)
6. Identify regulatory agencies and their role in quality management and improvement. (6)
7. Define credentialing and identify the professional agencies involved. (7)
8. Identify the benefits of continuing education as related to improved patient care and professional enhancement. (8)
9. Discuss the origins of ethics and the role of ethical behavior in healthcare. (9)
10. Explain individual and societal rights, and cultural and economic conditions that may contribute to ethical dilemmas in healthcare. (10)
11. Explain legal issues in health care including parameters of legal responsibility in radiography, confidentiality, torts, negligence and malpractice. (11)
12. Describe the components, conditions and implications of informed consent with documentation. (12)
13. Outline the basic principles of radiation protection including potential biologic damage, and safe radiation practices. (13)

2
RAD110 Radiographic Position/Image I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 110. Radiographic Positioning and Image Analysis I (4). Fundamentals of radiographic positioning for the upper and lower extremities, shoulder girdle, chest, pelvis, pelvic girdle, abdomen, cranium and basic mobile radiography. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program. Reading Proficiency. Corequisite: RAD 100 and RAD 120 and RAD 170. Two lecture. Six lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Terminology for positioning and projection
2. Procedural and general considerations
3. Positioning considerations
4. Image analysis standards
5. Image production factors and corrective action

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use anatomical nomenclature. (1,5)
2. Define standard positioning terms related to procedures of the upper and lower extremities, shoulder girdle, chest, pelvis, pelvic girdle, abdomen, and related mobile radiography. (1)
3. Explain general considerations for radiographic procedures of the upper and lower extremities, shoulder girdle, chest, pelvis, pelvic girdle, abdomen, and related mobile radiography including an evaluation of radiographic orders, patients with special needs, room preparation and patient communication. (2)
4. Adapt general positioning considerations of the upper and lower extremities, shoulder girdle, chest, pelvis, pelvic girdle, abdomen and related mobile radiography for positioning, centering, appropriate anatomy and overall image quality. (3)
5. Utilize image analysis standards to identify and evaluate the anatomy and radiographic image appearance characteristics of structures visualized on routine radiographs of the upper and lower extremities, shoulder girdle, chest, pelvis, pelvic girdle, abdomen, and related mobile radiography. (4)
6. Employ image production factors and corrective action for the special positions/projections of the upper and lower extremities, shoulder girdle, chest, pelvis, pelvic girdle, abdomen, and related mobile radiography. (5)

4
RAD120 Radiographic Technique I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 120. Radiographic Technique I (3). Fundamentals of image production, processing, film imaging with related accessories and image analysis based on technical imaging standards. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program. Reading Proficiency. Corequisite: RAD 100 and RAD 110 and RAD 170. Three lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Exposure factors
2. Density
3. Contrast
4. Recorded detail/spatial resolution
5. Distortion
6. Beam limiting devices
7. Beam filtration
8. Scattered and secondary radiation
9. Grids
10. Exposure factor formulation
11. Darkroom environment
12. Radiographic film
13. Image receptors
14. Film processing
15. Processor quality control

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the exposure factors required for image production. (1)
2. Analyze the relationship of factors that control and affect radiographic quality. (2)
3. Analyze the relationship of factors that control and affect radiographic contrast. (3)
4. Analyze the relationship of factors that control and affect recorded detail. (4)
5. Differentiate between size and shape distortion. (5)
6. Describe the operation and application of beam-limiting devices and the rationale for their use. (6)
7. Explain the impact beam filtration has on x-ray beam intensity, beam quality, half value layer, and resultant patient exposure. (7)
8. Summarize factors affecting scattered and secondary radiation and their effects on image quality. (8)
9. Discuss remnant beam control including a comparison of grid, grid efficiency, grid ratio and frequency, grid errors, grid artifacts and grid selection. (9)
10. Compare fixed kilovolt peak (kVp) and variable kVp systems. (10)
11. Explain the use of standardized radiographic technique charts and exposure factors used in selecting techniques. (10)
12. Apply conversion factors for changes in: distance, grid, image receptors, milliampere-second (mAs) reciprocity and 15 percent rule. (10)
13. Discuss the effects of film storage on image quality including safe light illumination. (11)
14. Describe the function of radiographic film components including latent image formation and characteristic curves. (12)
15. Describe the function and characteristics of various image receptors. (13)
16. Analyze the effects of processing on image quality. (2,3,14)
17. List the steps and components of automatic film processing including artifacts and silver recovery. (14)
18. Discuss the purpose of a daily quality control program for processors. (15)

3
RAD135 Radiation Physics and Equip

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 135. Radiation Physics and EquipmentI (3). Radiation production and characteristics. Includes fundamentals of atomic structure, concepts related to radiation and photon interactions with matter. Basics of imaging systems and quality control. Prerequisite: RAD 170. Corequisite: RAD 140 and RAD 150 and RAD 160. Three lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Structure of the atom
2. Nature of radiation
3. X-ray production
4. Interaction of photons with matter
5. X-ray circuit
6. Radiographic equipment
7. Diagnostic x-ray tubes
8. Image intensified fluoroscopy
9. Quality control

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe fundamental atomic structure. (1)
2. Explain the processes of ionization and excitation. (2)
3. Describe wavelength and frequency and their relationship to velocity. (3)
4. Explain the wave-particle duality phenomenon. (3)
5. Discuss various photon interactions with matter and their applications in diagnostic radiology. (2,4)
6. Identify general components and functions of tube and filament circuits. (5)
7. Define potential difference, current and resistance. (5)
8. Describe functions and components of automatic exposure control (AEC) devices. (6)
9. Discuss mobile units and permanent installation of radiographic equipment in terms of purpose, components, types and applications. (6)
10. Explain protocols used to extend x-ray tube life. (7)
11. Explain image intensified and digital fluoroscopy (8)
12. Indicate the purpose, construction, and application of video camera tubes, CCD, and TV monitors. (8)
13. Discuss the proper test equipment and procedures for evaluating the operation of an x-ray generator. (9)

3
RAD140 Radiographic Position/Image II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 140. Radiographic Positioning and Image Analysis II (4). Fundamentals of radiographic positioning of the vertebral column, cranium and bony thorax. Emphasis on contrast studies of urinary and digestive systems, and imaging during trauma and surgery. Includes procedural considerations for arthrography, myelography, venography and age specific imaging. Prerequisite: RAD 170. Corequisite: RAD 135 and RAD 150 and RAD 160. Two lecture. Six lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Terminology for positioning and projection
2. Procedural and general considerations
3. Positioning considerations
4. Image analysis standards
5. Image production factors and corrective action

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use anatomical nomenclature. (1,3)
2. Define standard positioning terms related to procedures of the vertebral column, cranium, bony thorax, studies of urinary and digestive systems, arthrography, myelography, venography and imaging during trauma and surgery. (1)
3. Explain procedural and general considerations for radiographic procedures of the vertebral column, cranium, bony thorax, studies of urinary and digestive systems, arthrography, myelography, venography and imaging during trauma and surgery; including an evaluation of radiographic orders, patients with special needs, room preparation and patient communication. (2)
4. Adapt general procedural considerations of the vertebral column, cranium, bony thorax, studies of urinary and digestive systems, arthrography, myelography, venography and imaging during trauma and surgery for positioning, centering, appropriate anatomy and overall image quality. (3)
5. Utilize image analysis standards to identify and evaluate the anatomy and radiographic image appearance characteristics of structures visualized on routine radiographs of the vertebral column, cranium, bony thorax, studies of urinary and digestive systems, arthrography, myelography, venography and imaging during trauma and surgery. (4)
6. Employ image production factors and corrective action for the special positions/projections of the vertebral column, cranium, bony thorax, studies of urinary and digestive systems, arthrography, myelography, venography and imaging during trauma and surgery. (5)

4
RAD150 Radiographic Technique II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 150. Radiographic Technique II (3). Principles and operation of digital imaging systems with an emphasis on image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval. Includes principles of digital system quality assurance and maintenance. Prerequisite: RAD 170. Corequisite: RAD 135 and RAD 140 and RAD 160. Three lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Terminology
2. Digital principles
3. Image acquisition and processing
4. Image acquisition errors
5. Fundamental principles of exposure
6. Digital image evaluation
7. Quality assurance and maintenance issues
8. Display monitors
9. Patient exposure
10. Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define terminology associated with digital imaging systems. (1)
2. Describe the basic principles of digital radiography including digital image characteristics and digital receptors. (2)
3. Describe the histogram and the process or histogram analysis as it relates to automatic rescaling and determining an exposure indicator. (3)
4. Employ appropriate beam/part/receptor alignment to avoid histogram analysis errors. (4)
5. Describe the response of photostimulable storage phosphor (PSP) systems to background and scatter radiation (4)
6. Evaluate the spatial resolution and dose effectiveness for digital radiography detectors. (5)
7. Relate the exposure receptor indicator values to technical factors, system calibration, part/beam/plate alignment and patient exposure. (5,7,9)
8. Identify grid use errors associated with grid cut off and the Moirť effect. (6)
9. Identify maintenance procedures and a process to minimize histogram analysis and rescaling errors. (4,7)
10. Evaluate the effect of a given exposure change on histogram shape, data width, and image appearance. (8)
11. Examine the potential impact of digital radiographic systems on patient exposure and methods of practicing the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept. (9)
12. Describe Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) components, function and associated principles. (10)
13. Identify common problems associated with retrieving and viewing images within a PACS. (10)

3
RAD160 Radiology Clinical Ed I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 160. Radiology Clinical Education I (3). Orientation to the clinical environment. Supervised clinical assignments focus on a progressive structure of observation, assistance and completion of a semester benchmark of selected radiographic competencies. Competency based experiences support the acquisition of elementary patient care and radiographic positioning skills. Prerequisite:RAD 170. Corequisite: RAD 135 and RAD 140 and RAD 150. Nine lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scope of practice
2. Procedural performance
3. Team concepts
4. Adaptation
5. Emergency preparedness
6. Diversity
7. Communication
8. Professional and personal values
9. Patient education
10. Psychosocial considerations
11. Assessment
12. Demographic factors
13. Standard precautions
14. Sterile technique
15. Radiation protection
16. Equipment malfunction
17. Procedure orders
18. Safety, ethical and legal standards
19. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
20. Body mechanics
21. Patient transfers
22. Patient positioning
23. Immobilization
24. Protocols
25. Technical considerations
26. Image critique and repeat images
27. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) competency requirements

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Manage the priorities required in daily clinical practice. (1)
2. Execute medical imaging procedures under the appropriate level of supervision. (2)
3. Adhere to team practice concepts that focus on organizational theories, roles of team members and conflict resolution. (3)
4. Adapt to changes and varying clinical situations. (4)
5. Describe the role of health care team members in responding and reacting to a local or national emergency. (5)
6. Respond to medical emergencies and execute basic life support procedures. (5)
7. Provide patient-centered clinically effective care for all patients regardless of age, gender, disability, special needs, ethnicity or culture. (6)
8. Integrate the use of written, oral and nonverbal communication with patients, the public and members of the health care team in the clinical setting. (7)
9. Describe the influence of personal and professional values on patient care. (8)
10. Use patient and family education strategies. (9)
11. Provide psychosocial support to the patient and family. (10)
12. Assess the patient and record clinical history. (11)
13. Examine demographic factors that influence patient compliance with medical care. (12)
14. Apply standard and transmission-based precautions. (13)
15. Apply medical asepsis and sterile technique. (14)
16. Apply radiation protection standards. (15)
17. Report equipment malfunctions. (16)
18. Examine procedure orders for accuracy and make corrective actions when applicable. (17)
19. Integrate the radiographer's safe, ethical and legal practice standards into the clinical setting. (18)
20. Maintain patient confidentiality and meet HIPAA requirements. (19)
21. Utilize body mechanic principles when transferring, positioning and immobilizing patients. (20-23)
22. Adhere to national, institutional and departmental standards, policies and procedures regarding care of patients, radiologic procedures and reducing medical errors. (24)
23. Select technical factors to produce diagnostic images with the lowest radiation exposure possible. (25)
24. Critique images for appropriate anatomy, image quality and patient identification. (26)
25. Determine and apply measures to correct inadequate images. (26)
26. Perform radiographic exams as outlined in the Competency Requirements for Primary Certification of the ARRT. (27)

3
RAD170 Radiology Patient Care

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 170. Radiology Patient Care (2). Concepts of patient care with consideration for the physical and psychological needs of the patient and family. Includes routine and emergency patient care procedures, infection control procedures and patient education. Prerequisite: Admission to the Radiologic Technology program. Reading Proficiency. Corequisite: RAD 100 and RAD 110 and RAD 120. Two lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Radiographer responsibilities and the health care team
2. Patient attitudes towards illness
3. Communication in patient care
4. Patient/radiographer interactions
5. Safety and transfer positioning
6. Evaluating physical needs
7. Infection control
8. Medical emergencies
9. Trauma
10. Patient education and preparation in contrast exams
11. Patient reactions to contrast agents
12. Tubes, catheters, lines, and collection devices
13. Mobile and surgical radiography

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the responsibilities of the health care facility and members of the health care team. (1)
2. Describe the practice standards for the radiographer as defined by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) and state licensure. (1)
3. Explain how a personís cultural beliefs toward illness and health affect their health status. (2)
4. Explain perceptions of death and dying from the viewpoint of both the patient and radiographer. (2)
5. Explain the age-specific considerations necessary when performing radiographic procedures. (3)
6. Identify methods for determining the correct patient for a given procedure. (4,5)
7. Explain specific aspects of the radiographic procedure to the patient. (3-5)
8. Apply principles of body mechanics to patient care including the application of patient transfer techniques. (5)
9. Describe immobilization techniques for various procedures and patient conditions. (5)
10. Describe patient safety measures and concerns. (5,6)
11. List information to be collected prior to a patient examination and describe methods to evaluate patient physical status. (5,6)
12. Describe vital signs and lab values used to assess patient condition. (6)
13. Identify sites for assessment of vital signs and normal values. (6)
14. Describe standard precautions and isolation procedures. (7)
15. Identify sources and modes of transmission of infection and disease. (7)
16. Describe the studentís role during a medical emergency. (8)
17. Describe the procedures for management of various types of trauma situations. (9)
18. Explain the role of the radiographer in patient education and preparation for contrast studies. (10)
19. Describe the symptoms and medical interventions for a patient with a contrast agent reaction. (11)
20. Identify specific types of tubes, lines, catheters and collection devices. (12)
21. Outline the steps in the operation and maintenance of suction, oxygen equipment, specific medical emergency equipment and supplies. (8,12)
22. Explain the radiation protection required when performing mobile/surgical radiography. (13)
23. Describe the procedure for producing diagnostic images in the surgical suite and for various mobile procedures. (13)

2
RAD180 Radiology Clinical Ed II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 180. Radiology Clinical Education II (3). Reinforcement of radiographic skills and the addition of new competencies toward completion of a semester benchmark of radiographic competencies. Supervised clinical assignments emphasize work in the clinical environment and performance of radiographic competencies. Competency based experiences support acquisition of intermediate patient care and radiographic positioning skills. Prerequisite: RAD 160. Corequisite: RAD 220. Nine lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scope of practice
2. Procedural performance
3. Team concepts
4. Adaptation
5. Emergency preparedness
6. Diversity
7. Communication
8. Professional and personal values
9. Patient education
10. Psychosocial considerations
11. Assessment
12. Demographic factors
13. Standard precautions
14. Sterile technique
15. Radiation protection
16. Equipment malfunction
17. Procedure orders
18. Safety, ethical and legal standards
19. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
20. Body mechanics
21. Patient transfers
22. Patient positioning
23. Immobilization
24. Protocols
25. Technical considerations
26. Image critique and repeat images
27. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) competency requirements

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Manage the priorities required in daily clinical practice. (1)
2. Execute medical imaging procedures under the appropriate level of supervision. (2)
3. Adhere to team practice concepts that focus on organizational theories, roles of team members and conflict resolution. (3)
4. Adapt to changes and varying clinical situations. (4)
5. Describe the role of health care team members in responding and reacting to a local or national emergency. (5)
6. Respond to medical emergencies and execute basic life support procedures. (5)
7. Provide patient-centered clinically effective care for all patients regardless of age, gender, disability, special needs, ethnicity or culture. (6)
8. Integrate the use of written, oral and nonverbal communication with patients, the public and members of the health care team in the clinical setting. (7)
9. Describe the influence of personal and professional values on patient care. (8)
10. Use patient and family education strategies. (9)
11. Provide psychosocial support to the patient and family. (10)
12. Assess the patient and record clinical history. (11)
13. Examine demographic factors that influence patient compliance with medical care. (12)
14. Apply standard and transmission-based precautions. (13)
15. Apply medical asepsis and sterile technique. (14)
16. Apply radiation protection standards. (15)
17. Report equipment malfunctions. (16)
18. Examine procedure orders for accuracy and make corrective actions when applicable. (17)
19. Integrate the radiographer's safe, ethical and legal practice standards into the clinical setting. (18)
20. Maintain patient confidentiality and meet HIPAA requirements. (19)
21. Utilize body mechanic principles when transferring, positioning and immobilizing patients. (20-23)
22. Adhere to national, institutional and departmental standards, policies and procedures regarding care of patients, radiologic procedures and reducing medical errors. (24)
23. Select technical factors to produce diagnostic images with the lowest radiation exposure possible. (25)
24. Critique images for appropriate anatomy, image quality and patient identification. (26)
25. Determine and apply measures to correct inadequate images. (26)
26. Perform radiographic exams as outlined in the Competency Requirements for Primary Certification of the ARRT. (27)

3
RAD200 Radiology Clinical Ed III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 200. Radiology Clinical Education III (7). Advancement of radiographic skills and the addition of new competencies to complete a semester benchmark of selected radiographic competencies. Advanced organizational skills, speed and accuracy in the performance of clinical competencies. Competency based experiences support the acquisition of limited working proficiency in patient care and radiographic positioning skills. Prerequisite: RAD 220. Twenty-one lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scope of practice
2. Procedural performance
3. Team concepts
4. Adaptation
5. Emergency preparedness
6. Diversity
7. Communication
8. Patient education
9. Psychosocial considerations
10. Assessment
11. Standard precautions
12. Sterile technique
13. Radiation protection
14. Equipment malfunction
15. Procedure orders
16. Safety, ethical and legal standards
17. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
18. Body mechanics
19. Patient transfers
20. Patient positioning
21. Immobilization
22. Protocols
23. Technical considerations
24. Image critique and repeat images
25. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) competency requirements

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Manage the priorities required in daily clinical practice. (1)
2. Execute medical imaging procedures under the appropriate level of supervision. (2)
3. Adhere to team practice concepts that focus on organizational theories, roles of team members and conflict resolution. (3)
4. Adapt to changes and varying clinical situations. (4)
5. Respond to medical emergencies and execute basic life support procedures. (5)
6. Provide patient-centered clinically effective care for all patients regardless of age, gender, disability, special needs, ethnicity or culture. (6)
7. Integrate the use of written, oral and nonverbal communication with patients, the public and members of the health care team in the clinical setting. (7)
8. Use patient and family education strategies. (8)
9. Provide psychosocial support to the patient and family. (9)
10. Assess the patient and record clinical history. (10)
11. Apply standard and transmission-based precautions. (11)
12. Apply medical asepsis and sterile technique. (12)
13. Apply radiation protection standards. (13)
14. Report equipment malfunctions. (14)
15. Examine procedure orders for accuracy and make corrective actions when applicable. (15)
16. Integrate the radiographer's safe, ethical and legal practice standards into the clinical setting. (16)
17. Maintain patient confidentiality and meet HIPAA requirements. (17)
18. Utilize body mechanic principles when transferring, positioning and immobilizing patients. (18-21)
19. Adhere to national, institutional and departmental standards, policies and procedures regarding care of patients, radiologic procedures and reducing medical errors. (22)
20. Select technical factors to produce diagnostic images with the lowest radiation exposure possible. (23)
21. Critique images for appropriate anatomy, image quality and patient identification. (24)
22. Determine and apply measures to correct inadequate images. (24)
23. Perform radiographic exams as outlined in the Competency Requirements for Primary Certification of the ARRT. (25)

7
RAD220 Radiobiology & Rad Protection

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 220. Radiobiology and Radiation Protection (3). Principles of the interaction of ionizing radiation and biological systems. Includes concepts of radiation protection. Prerequisite: RAD 160. Corequisite: RAD 180. Three lecture. A-F grading.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to basic cellular biology and types of ionizing radiation
2. Radiation Energy Transfer
3. Radiation effects
4. Radiosensitivity and response
5. Radiation protection programs
6. Units, detection, and measurement
7. Surveys, regulatory/advisory agencies
8. Personnel monitoring
9. Application of radiation protection in construction design
10. Patient protection

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe principles of cellular biology. (1)
2. Discriminate between direct and indirect ionizing radiation. (2)
3. Describe radiation induced chemical reactions and potential biologic damage. (2)
4. Describe physical, chemical and biologic factors influencing cell and tissue response. (3)
5. Explain factors influencing radiosensitivity of least and most radiosensitive cells. (4)
6. Interpret dose response curves for dose levels and the degree of biologic response. (4)
7. Identify specific diseases associated with somatic and genetic radiation effects. (4)
8. Discuss embryo and fetal effects of radiation exposure, radiation-induced malignancies and acute radiation syndromes. (4)
9. Explain the objectives of a radiation safety program which include the ALARA concept, occupational exposure limits, personnel monitoring devices and dosimetry reports. (5)
10. Define radiation and radioactivity units of measurement. (6)
11. Identify effective dose limits (EDL) for occupational and non-occupational radiation exposure. (6,8)
12. Identify dose equivalent limits for the embryo and fetus in occupationally exposed women. (6,8)
13. Explain the functions of performance standards, surveys, regulations, regulatory and advisory agencies related to radiation protection. (7)
14. Explain the requirements, methods, types, and records of personnel monitoring. (8)
15. Describe the application and regulations of radiation protection principles including calculations of exposure with varying time, distance and shielding. (9)
16. Explain the operation of various x-ray and ancillary equipment with regard to radiation safety. (10)
17. Describe the potential radiation safety consequences of equipment failure. (10)

3
RAD230 Radiology Pharmacology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 230. Radiology Pharmacology (1). Basic concepts of radiology pharmacology. Includes techniques of venipuncture and administration of diagnostic contrast agents and intravenous medications. Prerequisite: RAD 200. Corequisite: RAD 240 and RAD 250 and RAD 260. One lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Drug nomenclature and classifications
2. Pharmacologic principles
3. Six rights of drug safety
4. Drug categories of relevance to radiography
5. Contrast agents
6. Routes of drug administration
7. Venipuncture
8. Current practice standards

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Distinguish between the chemical, generic and trade names for select drugs. (1)
2. Describe pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles of drugs. (2)
3. Explain the actions, uses and side effects for select drugs. (2)
4. Identify and describe the routes of drug administration. (3)
5. Explain the effects of select drugs on medical imaging procedures. (4)
6. Define the categories of contrast agents and give examples for each category. (5)
7. Explain the pharmacology of contrast agents. (5)
8. Describe the methods and techniques for administering various types of contrast agents. (6)
9. Differentiate between the two major sites of intravenous drug administration. (6,7)
10. Discuss the purposes and advantages of intravenous drug administration. (6)
11. Identify, describe and document complications associated with venipuncture and appropriate actions to resolve these complications. (7)
12. Differentiate and document dose calculations for adult and pediatric patients. (7)
13. Explain the current legal status and professional liability issues of the radiographerís role in contrast and/or drug administration. (8)

1
RAD240 Radiology Clinical Ed IV

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 240. Radiology Clinical Education IV (3). Refinement of advanced skills and completion of a semester benchmark of selected radiographic competencies. Supervised clinical assignments focus on progressively increasing levels of independent judgment in the performance of clinical competencies. Competency based experiences support the acquisition of advanced patient care and radiographic positioning skills. Prerequisite: RAD 200. Corequisite: RAD 230 and RAD 250 and RAD 260. Nine lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scope of practice
2. Procedural performance
3. Team concepts
4. Adaptation
5. Emergency preparedness
6. Diversity
7. Communication
8. Patient education
9. Psychosocial considerations
10. Assessment
11. Standard precautions
12. Sterile technique
13. Radiation protection
14. Equipment malfunction
15. Procedure orders
16. Safety, ethical and legal standards
17. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
18. Body mechanics
19. Patient transfers
20. Patient positioning
21. Immobilization
22. Protocols
23. Technical considerations
24. Image critique and repeat images
25. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) competency requirements

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Manage the priorities required in daily clinical practice. (1)
2. Execute medical imaging procedures under the appropriate level of supervision. (2)
3. Adhere to team practice concepts that focus on organizational theories, roles of team members and conflict resolution. (3)
4. Adapt to changes and varying clinical situations. (4)
5. Respond to medical emergencies and execute basic life support procedures. (5)
6. Provide patient-centered clinically effective care for all patients regardless of age, gender, disability, special needs, ethnicity or culture. (6)
7. Integrate the use of written, oral and nonverbal communication with patients, the public and members of the health care team in the clinical setting. (7)
8. Use patient and family education strategies. (8)
9. Provide psychosocial support to the patient and family. (9)
10. Assess the patient and record clinical history. (10)
11. Apply standard and transmission-based precautions. (11)
12. Apply medical asepsis and sterile technique. (12)
13. Apply radiation protection standards. (13)
14. Report equipment malfunctions. (14)
15. Examine procedure orders for accuracy and make corrective actions when applicable. (15)
16. Integrate the radiographer's safe, ethical and legal practice standards into the clinical setting. (16)
17. Maintain patient confidentiality and meet HIPAA requirements. (17)
18. Utilize body mechanic principles when transferring, positioning and immobilizing patients. (18-21)
19. Adhere to national, institutional and departmental standards, policies and procedures regarding care of patients, radiologic procedures and reducing medical errors. (22)
20. Select technical factors to produce diagnostic images with the lowest radiation exposure possible. (23)
21. Critique images for appropriate anatomy, image quality and patient identification. (24)
22. Determine and apply measures to correct inadequate images. (24)
23. Perform radiographic exams as outlined in the Competency Requirements for Primary Certification of the ARRT. (25)

3
RAD250 Radiographic Pathology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 250. Radiographic Pathology (2). Concepts of disease and the etiology of selected pathologic conditions. Emphasis on the radiographic appearance of various diseases and the influence of pathologic conditions on exposure factor selection. Prerequisite: RAD 200. Corequisite: RAD 230 and RAD 240 and RAD 260. Two lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Terminology
2. Manifestations of pathology
3. Trauma classifications
4. Disease process
5. Healing process
6. Systemic classifications
7. Radiographic pathology
8. Imaging procedures
9. Genetics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define basic terms related to pathology. (1)
2. Describe basic manifestations of pathological conditions and their relevance to radiologic procedures. (2)
3. Discuss the classifications of trauma. (3)
4. Describe the disease process, causes of tissue disruption and complications connected with the repair and replacement of tissue. (4)
5. Describe the healing process.(5)
6. Describe systemic classifications of disease in terms of etiology, types, common sites, complications and prognosis. (6)
7. Identify selected radiographic pathology. (7)
8. Identify imaging procedures and interventional techniques appropriate for diseases common to each body system. (8)
9. Identify diseases caused by genetic factors. (9)

2
RAD260 Adv Imaging Systems

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 260. Advanced Imaging Systems (3). Overview of the various fields of medical imaging with a focus on Computed Tomography. Prerequisite: RAD 200. Corequisite: RAD 230 and RAD 240 and RAD 250. Three lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Imaging modalities
2. Modality principles
3. Modality integration
4. Radiation safety
5. Computed Tomography (CT) Fundamentals
6. CT system components, operations & processes
7. Data acquisition and image processing
8. CT equipment and instrumentation
9. CT image quality and artifacts
10. CT procedures
11. CT radiation protection
12. CT cross-sectional anatomy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the energies used to generate images in medical imaging. (1)
2. Explain the theoretical principles and the practical applications of various specialties within medical imaging. (2)
3. Define and discuss modality integration. (3)
4. Describe radiation and other safety practices within the modalities. (4)
5. Explain the benefits and clinical applications of CT scan technology. (5)
6. Describe the components, operations and processes of the CT imaging system. (6)
7. Describe the function of the array processor used for image processing and reconstruction. (7)
8. Name the common controls found on CT operator consoles and describe their usages. (8)
9. Identify and describe artifacts most commonly affecting CT images and how they can be reduced or eliminated. (9)
10. List and describe common procedures and techniques used in CT. (10)
11. Describe the application of radiation protection devices used in CT. (11)
12. Identify cross-sectional anatomy for common procedures of the head, chest and abdomen. (12)

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RAD270 Radiology Registry Review

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 270. Radiology Registry Review (3). Review of standard subject materials in preparation for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Examination. Prerequisite: RAD 260. Three lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. ARRT categories
2. Review process
3. Study strategies
4. Resources
5. Radiation protection
6. Equipment and quality control
7. Image production and analysis
8. Procedures
9. Patient care

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify categories of the registry examination including content areas and associated concepts within each category. (1)
2. Outline a plan for the review process. (2)
3. Identify strategies to enhance and improve retention of radiographic concepts and skills and determine personal focus areas of study. (3)
4. Utilize various review resources including books, CDs, and on-line materials to augment examination preparation. (4)
5. Summarize the concepts of radiation protection. (5)
6. Evaluate the main points of equipment operation and quality control. (6)
7. Summarize the principles of image production and analysis. (7)
8.Describe the required radiographic procedures including anatomy, positioning, and pathology. (8)
9. Explain the standards of patient care in the radiologic sciences. (9)

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RAD280 Radiology Clinical Ed V

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
RAD 280. Radiology Clinical Educaiton V (3). Completion of program competencies and observational experiences in advanced imaging modalities. Supervised clinical assignments to achieve mastery of radiographic positioning and patient care skills outlined in the Competency Requirements for Primary Certification of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (AART). Skills are refined in preparation to join the workforce as an entry-level practitioner. Prerequisite: RAD 260. Nine lab. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scope of practice
2. Procedural performance
3. Team concepts
4. Adaptation
5. Emergency preparedness
6. Diversity
7. Communication
8. Patient education
9. Psychosocial considerations
10. Assessment
11. Standard precautions
12. Sterile technique
13. Radiation protection
14. Equipment malfunction
15. Procedure orders
16. Safety, ethical and legal standards
17. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
18. Body mechanics
19. Patient transfers
20. Patient positioning
21. Immobilization
22. Protocols
23. Technical considerations
24. Image critique and repeat images
25. American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) competency requirements

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Manage the priorities required in daily clinical practice. (1)
2. Execute medical imaging procedures under the appropriate level of supervision. (2)
3. Adhere to team practice concepts that focus on organizational theories, roles of team members and conflict resolution. (3)
4. Adapt to changes and varying clinical situations. (4)
5. Respond to medical emergencies and execute basic life support procedures. (5)
6. Provide patient-centered clinically effective care for all patients regardless of age, gender, disability, special needs, ethnicity or culture. (6)
7. Integrate the use of written, oral and nonverbal communication with patients, the public and members of the health care team in the clinical setting. (7)
8. Use patient and family education strategies. (8)
9. Provide psychosocial support to the patient and family. (9)
10. Assess the patient and record clinical history. (10)
11. Apply standard and transmission-based precautions. (11)
12. Apply medical asepsis and sterile technique. (12)
13. Apply radiation protection standards. (13)
14. Report equipment malfunctions. (14)
15. Examine procedure orders for accuracy and make corrective actions when applicable. (15)
16. Integrate the radiographer's safe, ethical and legal practice standards into the clinical setting. (16)
17. Maintain patient confidentiality and meet HIPAA requirements. (17)
18. Utilize body mechanic principles when transferring, positioning and immobilizing patients. (18-21)
19. Adhere to national, institutional and departmental standards, policies and procedures regarding care of patients, radiologic procedures and reducing medical errors. (22)
20. Select technical factors to produce diagnostic images with the lowest radiation exposure possible. (23)
21. Critique images for appropriate anatomy, image quality and patient identification. (24)
22. Determine and apply measures to correct inadequate images. (24)
23. Perform radiographic exams as outlined in the Competency Requirements for Primary Certification of the ARRT. (25)

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III.  Related Requirements
AHS130 Medical Term for Patient Care

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AHS 130. Medical Terminology for Patient Care Staff (3). Medical terminology used in direct patient care, with special care populations and in special services. Building and analyzing terms using work parts. Body-systems approach to terms related to structure and function, pathologies, and diagnostic procedures. Spelling and pronunciation of terms, medical abbreviations and symbols. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to Medical Terminology
a. Basic work structure
b. Body as a whole
c. Common combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes
2. Body Systems
a. Structures
b. Functions
c. Pathologies
d. Diagnostics
e. Clinical procedures
f. Additional suffices, prefixes, combining forms
g. Abbreviations
3. Obstetrics
a. Conception and pregnancy
b. Hormonal interactions
c. Pregnancy and neonatal pathologies
d. Clinical tests and procedures related to obstetrics
e. Additional suffixes, prefixes, combining forms
f. Abbreviations
4. Cancer Medicine (Oncology)
a. Carcinogenesis
b. Characteristics, classification, grading, and staging of tumors
c. Pathological descriptions
d. Diagnostic, clinical procedures, and treatment terms
e. Additional suffixes, prefixes, combining forms
f. Abbreviations
5. Radiology and Nuclear Medicine
a. X-ray properties, positioning, and techniques
b. Radioactive and radionuclide tests
c. In vitro and in vivo procedures
d. Additional suffixes, prefixes, combining forms
e. Abbreviation
6. Psychiatry/Mental Health
a. Introduction
b. Clinical symptoms and disorders
c. Terminology related to treatment
d. Additional suffixes, prefixes, combining forms
e. Abbreviations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Divide medical words into their component parts (1a)
2. Define the meaning of basic combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes (1a,c, 2f, 3e, 4e, 5d, 6d)
3. Use combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes to build medical terms (1a,c, 2f, 3e, 4e, 5d, 6d)
4. Identify and define terms pertaining to the body as a whole (1b)
5. Describe positions, directions, and planes of the body (1b)
6. Name the locations and/or structures of body systems (2a)
7. Describe the functions of body systems (2b)
8. Describe disease processes and symptoms that affect body systems (2c)
9. List and explain diagnostic tests and clinical procedures common to different body systems (2d,e)
10. Identify abbreviations common to body systems, pathologies, tests, clinical procedures, and specialty areas (2g, 3f, 4f, 5e, 6e)
11. Explain how female reproductive organs and hormones function in the process of conception and pregnancy. (3a,b)
12. Identify abnormal conditions of the pregnancy and the neonate. (3c)
13. Explain important clinical tests and procedures related to obstetrics (3d)
14. Define terms that describe the growth and spread of cancer. (4a)
15. Recognize terms related to classification, grading and staging of tumors. (4b)
16. Describe oncology pathologies, diagnostics, clinical procedures and treatments (4c,d)
17. Explain terms related to x-ray properties, positioning, and techniques (5a)
18. Define terms used to describe radioactive and radionuclide tests (5b,c)
19. Differentiate between different metal health specialists. (6a)
20. Define terms that describe psychiatric symptoms and disorders. (6b)
21. Describe different psychiatric treatments and common psychiatric drugs. (6c)

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BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 202. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2202. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include reproductive, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. Prerequisite: BIO 201. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands
2. Hormonal actions
3. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system
4. Anatomy and physiology of blood
5. Anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system
6. Anatomy and physiology of the immune system
7. Fetal membranes and blood circulation
8. Anatomy and physiology of the digestive system
9. Metabolism
10. Anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system
11. Blood pressure and flow dynamics
12. Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
13. Ventilation mechanisms and gas transport
14. Anatomy and physiology of the urinary system
15. Urine formation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands. (1)
2. Describe the biological processes involved in hormonal actions. (2)
3. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system. (3)
4. Describe the anatomy and functions of blood. (4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system. (5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the immune system. (6)
7. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of fetal membranes and circulation. (7)
8. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system. (8)
9. Describe the biological processes involved in metabolism. (9)
10. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system. (10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in blood pressure dynamics. (11)
12. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. (12)
13. Describe and identify ventilation mechanisms. (13)
14. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the urinary system. (14)
15. Describe the biological processes involved urine formation. (15)
16. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the body. (1-15) (PBS 1)
17. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-15)
18. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2)
19. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2,3)
20. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-15)

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