Associate of Applied Science - Social and Human Services Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Instructional Specialist Holly Molina (928) 776-2295
Program Director Al Garbagnati (928) 771-4852
Dean Jill Fitzgerald (928) 776-2277

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Applied Science - Social and Human Services

The Associate of Applied Science in Social and Human Services is designed to prepare students to work in health and social service agencies as well as prepare those students wishing to transfer to a Bachelor’s degree program in Human Services/Social Work or a related Social and Behavioral Science discipline.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Social and Human Services Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Describe the history and policies of the current social welfare delivery system. (SOC 220)
  2. Apply interpersonal and clinical counseling skills with clients in the therapeutic process. (PSY 175, PSY 275)
  3. Utilize crisis and trauma counseling skills and intervention strategies. (PSY 262)
  4. Employ case management techniques to identify and resolve client problems. (PSY 220)
  5. Discuss the impact of psychological and substance abuse. (PSY 101, PSY 175, PSY 241)
  6. Identify legal and ethical issues as they apply to social and human services. (PSY 220, PSY 296)
  7. Provide intervention services within local community social and human service agencies. (PSY 296)
 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition or Applied Communication - Select Option a or b:   1
          a.  Writing (6 credits)
Choose two courses from list - if preparing for transfer, choose College Composition 
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA105 Business English   3
CRW139 Intro to Creative Writing   3
ENG101 College Composition I   3
ENG102 College Composition II   3
ENG103 College Composition I Honors   3
ENG104 College Composition II Honors   3
ENG136 Technical Writing   3
JRN150 Mediawriting and Reporting   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
          b.  Writing AND Communication (6 credits)
Choose one course from each list
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA105 Business English   3
CRW139 Intro to Creative Writing   3
ENG101 College Composition I   3
ENG102 College Composition II   3
ENG103 College Composition I Honors   3
ENG104 College Composition II Honors   3
ENG136 Technical Writing   3
JRN150 Mediawriting and Reporting   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
AND
 
Show / hide all applied communication/comm. courses

Applied Communication/Comm. Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/comm. component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
BSA233 Business Communications   3
COM100 Intro Human Communication   3
COM131 Fund Speech Communication   3
COM134 Interpersonal Communication   3
COM135 Workplace Communication Skills   3
COM271 Small Group Communication   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)   2
Choose from approved List - if preparing for transfer, choose MAT 142 or 152
 
Show / hide all quantitative literacy courses

Quantitative Literacy Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the quantitative literacy component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
MAT100 Technical Mathematics   3
MAT122 Intermediate Algebra   3
MAT142 College Mathematics   3
MAT152 College Algebra   3
MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I   3
MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II   3
MAT167 Elementary Statistics   3
MAT172 Finite Mathematics   3
MAT183 Trigonometry   2
MAT187 Precalculus   5
MAT212 Survey of Calculus   3
MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I   5
MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II   5
MAT241 Calculus III   4
MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all critical thinking courses

Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & the Admin of Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Acad Reading Critical Thinking   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Society and Technology   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
 
Show / hide all physical & biological science courses

Physical & Biological Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biological science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AGS103 Plant Biology   4
BIO100 Biology Concepts   4
BIO103 Plant Biology   4
BIO105 Environmental Biology   4
BIO107 Introduction to Biotechnology   4
BIO108 Concepts in Plant Biology   4
BIO109 Natural History Southwest   4
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health   4
BIO160 Intro Human Anat & Physiology   4
BIO181 General Biology I   4
BIO182 General Biology II   4
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I   4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II   4
BIO205 Microbiology   4
CHM121 Environmental Chemistry   4
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry   4
CHM138 Chemistry for Allied Health   5
CHM151 General Chemistry I   5
CHM152 General Chemistry II   5
CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I   4
CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab   1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II   4
CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab   1
ENV105 Environmental Biology   4
ENV110 Environmental Geology   4
ENV121 Environmental Chemistry   4
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography   4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology   4
GLG100 Concepts in Basic Geology   2
GLG101 Intro to Geology I   4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II   4
GLG110 Environmental Geology   4
GLG116 Geology Verde Valley   2
GLG117 Implications Plate Tectonics   2
GLG118 Evolution of Basin and Range   2
GLG119 Geology of Grand Canyon   2
GLG120 Geology of Northern Arizona   2
GLG121 Volcanoes/Earthquakes N AZ   2
GLG122 Geology of Death Valley   2
GLG123 Geology of Bryce and Zion   2
GLG124 Geology of the Prescott Region   2
PHY100 Intro to Astronomy   4
PHY111 General Physics I   4
PHY112 General Physics II   4
PHY140 The Physical World   4
PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I   5
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II   4
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
PSY101 Introductory Psychology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 101. Introductory Psychology (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPSY 1101. Introduction to psychology through such topics as the scientific method in psychology, survey of different fields in psychology, heredity and environment, intelligence, emotions, motivation, nervous system, and learning processes. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Psychology--definition and history of the discipline
2. Psychology as a science--methods and techniques of psychology
3. Learning, memory, and intelligence
4. Developmental psychology
5. Physiological psychology
6. Motivation and emotion
7. Personality development and assessment
8. Abnormal psychology--including therapeutic techniques
9. Social psychology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Compare and contrast various theoretical approaches which have suggested explanations of human and animal behavior. (BS 1)
2. Examine, compare and critically analyze both historical and current trends in psychological theory and research.
3. Identify scientific methodology including observation, correlation, and experimentation. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how these methods can be used to test hypotheses concerning behavior, thought, and feelings. (BS 2)
4. Analyze and critically evaluate research methods and conclusions. An awareness of both the value and limitations of various methods is necessary to achieve this goal.
5. Develop and test hypotheses using appropriate scientific methodology.
6. Examine and critically analyze various psychological perspectives relating to development, interpersonal relations, motivation, personality, and adjustment. (BS 3)
7. Describe and explain multiple causation, with an emphasis on environmental, biological, cognitive, developmental, and social/cultural determinants.
8. Analyze, compare, and evaluate various models for mental disorder and approaches to treatment.
9. Describe how psychological concepts relate to self awareness and everyday experience. (BS 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
II.  Social and Human Services Requirements
PSY175 Counseling Skills

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 175. Counseling Skills (3). Principles and practices which underlie the effective and ethical use of the helping relationship in human services Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The helping relationship
2. Helper development
3. Normative and non-normative crises
4. Values and ethics in the helping relationship
5. Developmental processes of helping
6. Models of helping
7. Communication skills in helping
8. Goal-setting in helping
9. Management of stress in helping
10. Special topics: drugs, prejudice, violence against women, etc.Explain the concepts and values that provide a basis for paraprofessional helping relationships.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Examine and critically evaluate ethical standards in the helping relationship.
2. Explore problem areas that are often encountered in helping relationships
3. Identify the stages and steps in helping and apply specific counseling principles.
4. Evaluate and explore normative and non-normative crises as opportunities for helping.
5. Apply supportive and directive models in the helping relationship.
6. Explore and apply the concept of self-preservation in the helping professions.

3
PSY220 Social Service Case Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 220. Social Service Case Management (3). Fundamental principles and mechanics of case management. Includes various models, processes and functions, and historical context. Emphasis on development of interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or PSY 175. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and guidelines
2. Case management delivery
3. Practical skills
4. Ethical issues
5. Legal implications

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify case management concepts and practices applied in contemporary social/human services. (1,2)
2. Develop and apply skills to the provision of case management services in outpatient and inpatient settings. (3)
3. Discuss ethical and legal adherence to established standards of practice. (4,5)

3
PSY241 Substance Abuse

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 241. Substance Abuse (3). Study of the physical, social, and psychological effects of substance abuse. The effects of substance abuse on the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nature and history of drug and alcohol abuse
2. Types of drugs
3. Psychological factors
4. Physiological factors
5. Social and criminal factors
6. Research in the field
7. Treatment methods
8. Anti-drug legislation
9. Legalization and decriminalization of drugs

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the symptoms and consequences of substance abuse
2. Identify and categorize the types of drugs most associated with abuse.
3. Summarize the history of drug and alcohol abuse.
4. Characterize several treatment approaches to drug abuse.
5. Review current research in drug abuse.
6. Analyze the effects of drugs on the criminal justice system.

3
PSY262 Crisis and Trauma Intervention

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 262. Crisis and Trauma Intervention (3). Impact of critical and traumatic events on daily and long-term psychological and physical functioning. Emphasis on intervention strategies. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or PSY 175. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical and current research
2. Behavioral, physiological and psychological effects of crisis and trauma
3. Treatment strategies

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify behavioral, physiological and psychological symptoms associated with traumatic and critical incidents. (2)
2. Discuss mental health disorders associated with psychological stress and trauma. (1,2)
3. Identify factors that inhibit or enhance traumatic and crisis reactions. (1,2)
4. Investigate current issues in the field of psychological trauma and critical incidents. (1,3)
5. Identify and apply treatment options. (3)

3
PSY275 Group Skills and Processes

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 275. Group Skills and Processes (3). Application of concepts and techniques appropriate to the stages of a group's development. Emphasis on a group process in action. Prerequisite: PSY 175. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Group process stages
2. Leadership and co-leadership roles
3. Member roles and expectations
4. Types of groups
5. Approaches to group work

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply techniques in opening and closing a group session. (1,2)
2. Formulate an agenda for a group session. (2,4,5)
3. Utilize skills to help group members formulate personal goals. (2,3)
4. Describe a group leader's role in working with issues of diversity. (2)
5. Identify and discuss ways to build trust in a group setting. (1-3)

3
.
PSY296 Internship: Psychology  3

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 296. Internship: Psychology (3). Supervised field experience with businesses, corporations, government agencies, schools and community organizations to expand career interests and apply subject knowledge relevant to the workplace. Individualized internship placements to develop personal and professional skills, including professional ethics, leadership, and civic responsibility. Student must have a GPA of 2.0; have completed specific degree requirements as required by the program; and have completed the internship application process. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.] S/U grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Organizational overview of assigned placement
2. Integration of job description and organization's requirements
3. Elements of documentation of experience
4. Planning and time management
5. Professional, legal, and ethical issues
6. Communication, critical thinking, and problem solving
7. Specialized equipment, tools, and software required in the placement

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Exhibit appropriate workplace behaviors and professional ethics.
2. Apply discipline specific knowledge and skills in the professional workplace.
3. Define and utilize technical terms in written and oral communications.
4. Use critical thinking, problem solving, ethical awareness, and effective writing
5. Interpret written and oral instructions.
6. Initiate and complete assigned responsibilities.
7. Maintain documentation required to comply with government employer or nonprofit agency regulations.
8. Use specialized equipment, software, and tools as required.
9. Analyze and interpret data for specified reports.
10. Identify opportunities for improvement in process and documentation related to the workplace.
11. Articulate job description and position in assigned organization.
REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Record of Student Internship workplace hours.
2. Individual Education Plan (IEP) as approved by supervision faculty.
3. A daily journal, or work log of tasks, including dates, descriptive comments, problems and solutions.
4. A reflective paper or project as specified by the supervision faculty.
5. A minimum of two evaluations by the workplace employer or supervisor.
6. Student's self-evaluation of experience.

3
OR GRN295 Practicum in Gerontology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GRN 295. Practicum in Gerontology (2). Field experience to apply gerontological theory in a practice setting. Supervision by "on site" supervisor and instructor. Prerequisite: GRN 294. Six lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Initial meeting with faculty advisor to develop a field placement plan
2. Six hour field experience per week
3. Consultation with advisor weekly for field learning, relative to placement activities
4. Literature related to field placement
5. Written log assessing weekly activities
6. Final evaluation with faculty advisor

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the relationship between theory and practice
2. Identify the value base of the field placement
3. Provide service to older adults which includes:
a. Initiate relationships with clients;
b. Assess client needs;
c. Develop case management plans;
d. Connect case management to client needs, agency scope of practice and resources available;
e. Terminating care.
4. Describe the relationships formed in practice, with older adults and among agencies in the community.
5. Identify and discuss the legal and ethical components of the practice experience.

2
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SOC220 Intro to Social Work

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
SOC 220. Introduction to Social Work (3). Survey of social work as a profession and social welfare as an institution. Social work: historical development, principles, philosophy, and practices. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to the field of social work
2. History of the social welfare institutions
3. Nature and characteristic of the profession: value base, knowledge base, skill base
4. Case studies
5. Fields of practice
6. Major concerns of social work
7. Current developments in social work
8. Perspectives for the futureDefine social work, social welfare, and social services.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Distinguish social work from the other helping professions.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the history and philosophy of social work.
3. Identify methods of social work practice in the delivery of service of social welfare programs.
4. Identify the services and programs of the major fields of practice.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic nature of social work and social welfare.
6. Formulate a perspective toward the future of social work as a viable profession.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 1500 words), critical reasoning, and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
II.  Related Requirements - Select 21 credit hours from the following courses:
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ANT 102. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3). Survey of anthropological principles with emphasis on concept of culture and nature of man as a social animal. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to anthropology, its method and development
2. Language, communication and culture
3. Subsistence efficiency and cultural ecology
4. Comparative economic systems
5. Kinship systems: marriage and the family
6. Levels of social organization and political systems
7. Race, gender and ethnicity
8. Ideology, magic and religion
9. Culture and personality
10. Culture change
11. Global society and applied anthropology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Examine and critically analyze significant perspectives, methodologies and theories which guide research in anthropology. (SS 2)
2. Develop an awareness of the role played by culture on the behavior of individuals and groups in diverse societal settings. (SS 4)
3. Develop curiosity and empathy for cultural diversity which is based on ethnic, race and gender differences. (SS 4)
4. Foster a classroom environment where questioning of ethnocentric attitudes and the clarification of racially, ethnically and gender based values are allowed to challenge traditional western notions. (SS 5)
5. Develop those social science insights that are desirable for all educated persons. (SS 1)
6. Develop critical thinking skills in relation to anthropological scientific concepts. (SS 1)
7. Enhance competence and performance of critical reading and independent thinking in anthropological knowledge. (SS 3)
8. Employ critical reasoning, and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers. (SS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
ECE200 Intro Early Childhood Ed

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ECE 200. Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3). Introduction to the field of Early Childhood Education including history, philosophy, and the application of child development techniques. Includes techniques for observing and recording behaviors, communication and guidance skills, developmentally appropriate practices and the role of the teacher in early childhood settings. Observation and participation hours in an early childhood setting required. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History and philosophies of early childhood education
2. Theories of child development
3. Techniques for observation and implementation of developmentally appropriate activities
4. Professionalism and ethics
5. Developmentally appropriate practices in teaching, learning and designing environments
6. Observing and recording behaviors
7. Guidance of young children

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify major milestones and philosophies in the history of early childhood education. (1)
2. Explain how child guidance techniques relate to contemporary child development models. (2,7)
3. Apply theories of development and guidance in observing and planning specific activities for young children. (2,3,5,7)
4. Discuss issues of professionalism and advocacy in Early Childhood Education. (4)
5. Illustrate developmentally appropriate practice through teaching, learning activities and environment preparation. (4-6)

3
.
ECE234 Child Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ECE 234. Child Development (3). Children's development from conception through childhood. Includes prenatal, brain, physical, sensory, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development, as well as genetics and cultural influences. This course is cross-listed with PSY 234. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Genetics, prenatal, and birth
2. Physical development through childhood
3. Cognitive development through childhood
4. Language development through childhood
5. Emotional development through childhood
6. Social development through childhood
7. Cultural influences on child development

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Summarize research methods applied to various theoretical perspectives of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,2)
2. Describe major developmental themes (e.g. nature-nurture, stability and change, early-late experiences, and continuity - discontinuity) as applied to child development theories. (2-6) (BS 1)
3. Evaluate various theories of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,3,4)
4. Delineate genetic and prenatal influences on child development. (1) (BS 3)
5. Analyze the interplay of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. (2-6) (BS 4)
6. Identify the probable effects of parents, family, peers, teachers, and community on child development. (2-6) (BS 4)
7. Conduct research on topics related to child development. (1-7) (BS 2)
8. Discuss the cultural influences on child development. (7) (BS 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1,500 words of monitored writing.

3
OR PSY234 Child Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 234. Child Development (3). Children's development from conception through childhood. Includes prenatal, brain, physical, sensory, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development, as well as genetics and cultural influences. This course is cross-listed with ECE 234. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Genetics, prenatal, and birth
2. Physical development through childhood
3. Cognitive development through childhood
4. Language development through childhood
5. Emotional development through childhood
6. Social development through childhood
7. Cultural influences on child development

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Summarize research methods applied to various theoretical perspectives of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,2)
2. Describe major developmental themes (e.g. nature-nurture, stability and change, early-late experiences, and continuity - discontinuity) as applied to child development theories. (2-6) (BS 1)
3. Evaluate various theories of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,3,4)
4. Delineate genetic and prenatal influences on child development. (1) (BS 3)
5. Analyze the interplay of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. (2-6) (BS 4)
6. Identify the probable effects of parents, family, peers, teachers, and community on child development. (2-6) (BS 4)
7. Conduct research on topics related to child development. (1-7) (BS 2)
8. Discuss the cultural influences on child development. (7) (BS 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1,500 words of monitored writing.

3
.
GRN100 Intro Social Gerontology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GRN 100. Introduction to Social Gerontology (3). Gerontology is a multi-disciplinary field of study. Emphasis on psychology, sociology, economics, ethics, health care, legal issues related to working with older adults. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to Social Gerontology
2. Demographics of an Aging Population
3. History of Aging
4. Psychological Aspects of Aging
5. Social Aspects of Aging
6. Health and Aging
7. Economic Issues in an Aging Society
8. Cultural Images of Aging
9. Legal Issues in Aging

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the physiological, psychological and social aspects of aging.
2. Use professional vocabulary and terminology in the context of aging.
3. Explain the cultural variables that affect the status of the aged in our society.
4. Discuss the political and economic implications of an aging society.
5. Describe the variables that promote a healthy lifestyle.
6. Discuss the legal issues and public policy issues that impact an aging society.

3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GRN 101. Psychology of Aging (3). Study of the adult aging process. Focus on developmental psychology. Explore physiological, sociological and psychological issues affecting cognition, personality, and mental health in later years. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Theories of Adult Life
2. Behavioral Learning Theory
3. Cognition
4. Learning and Memory
5. Personality
6. Ethnicity and Culture
7. Psychological issues linked to age-related diseases
8. Legal Issues - Mental Health

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe specific theoretical models associated with aging. (1) (BS 1,2)
2. Describe the psychological and social aspects of aging. (2-5) (BS 1)
3. Use professional vocabulary and terminology in the context of aging. (1-2) (BS 3,4)
4. Explain the impact of personality and social supports on the aging process (5)
5. Distinguish and describe mental health issues in later life. (7,8)
6. Describe learning theory as it applies to older adults. (4)
7. Explain the variables affecting cognition and their impact on learning. (3) (BS 2)
8. Describe various personality models that relate to older adults. (5)
9. Explain how cultural roles and expectations impact the psychology of aging. (6) (BS 3,4)
10. Discuss the legal issues related to mental health issues and aging. (8)

3
GRN102 Health and Aging

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GRN 102. Health and Aging (3). Designed for students working with older adults. Emphasis on normal changes of aging and preventative measures for maintaining optimal functioning. Focus on health problems, symptoms and treatments. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Expected health changes in older adults
2. Distinguishing between normal aging and illness
3. Common health problems in older adults
4. Systems: reproductive, cardiovascular, urinary, digestive, respiratory
5. Cognitive impairment
6. Health care ethics
7. Legal issues in health care

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Distinguish between bodily changes due to aging and those caused by disease and destructive lifestyle. (1-5) (BS 3)
2. Identify specific disease entities and characterize the presenting signs and symptoms common to older people. (1-5) (BS 4)
3. Discuss both self-help and medical treatment modalities for selected disabilities. (1-7) (BS 1,3)
4. Discuss legal and ethical issues related to health care and older adults. (6,7) (BS 3,4)

3
GRN294 Practices in Gerontology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GRN 294. Practices in Gerontology (3). Development of skills such as interviewing, narrative writing, the casework process, intake and assessment, intervention and termination. The values associated with practice in the helping fields will be explored. Prerequisite: GRN 100 and GRN 102. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. What happens to policy on the way to the people?
2. Communication theory
3. Interviewing techniques
4. The casework process
5. Termination
6. Group decision making
7. Crisis intervention
8. The aging network
9. Ethics and legal issues

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Conduct client interviews; manage the casework process including intake, assessments, intervention and termination.
2. Write informed reports.
3. Summarize a common set of values within the helping profession.
4. Analyze the relationships between competing value systems when providing care to older adults.
5. Explain the dynamics of the casework process.
6. Describe how public policy impacts practice.
7. Describe the ethical and legal variables of practice.

3
PSY222 Fund of Prof/Life Coaching

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 222. Fundamentals of Professional and Life Coaching (4). Introduction to the theory and practice of life, relationship and career coaching as a profession. Prepares students for certification by the International Coach Federation (ICF), the major credentialing body for professional coaching. Prerequisite: Any SOC or PSY course. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Theoretical foundations for coaching
2. Ethical guidelines and professional standards
3. Coaching agreements
4. Trust and intimacy with the client
5. Coaching presence
6. Active listening
7. Powerful questioning
8. Direct communication
9. Creating awareness
10. Designing actions
11. Planning and goal setting
12. Managing progress and accountability
13. Models for coaching practice

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Articulate social science underlying coaching models and practices. (1)
2. Apply ethical guidelines and professional standards in coaching situations. (2)
3. Discuss with the client the guidelines and specific parameters of the coaching relationship. (3)
4. Create with the client a safe, supportive environment that produces ongoing mutual respect and trust. (4, 5)
5. Use active listening skills such as complete focusing, and ask questions that produce information needed for maximum benefit to the coaching relationship and the client. (6-8)
6. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information that help clients gain awareness and take actions that will most effectively lead to agreed-upon coaching results. (9-12)
7. Design a working model of proposed coaching practice. (13)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Coaching Interview Examination.

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PSY223 Adv Coaching Perspectives/Tech

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 223. Advanced Coaching Perspectives and Techniques (4) (Spring). Theoretical perspectives and techniques for professional coaching, focusing on particular contexts - group, relationship, leadership, executive and business coaching. Prerequisite: PSY 222. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Interdisciplinary perspectives impacting coaching
2. Case studies focusing on ethical guidelines and professional standards
3. Techniques for group coaching
4. Relationship coaching skills
5. Executive and leadership coaching models
6. Career and transitional coaching
7. Exploration of Self as Coach
8. Advanced tools for conducting the coaching conversation
9. Business models for various coaching practices

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Compare coaching theories and models, matching them to the appropriate context. (1)
2. Recognize and analyze ethical dilemas which arise in coaching situations. (2)
3. Develop and conduct group coaching sessions. (3)
4. Implement techniques appropriate for different coaching clients (leaders, business executives, people in relationships, clients in job and life transitions). (4-6)
5. Self evaluate skills and presence as a professional coach. (7, 8)
6. Articulate a business model corresponding to the direction of the desired coaching practice. (9)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Coaching Interview Examination.

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PSY240 Personality Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 240. Personality Development (3). Study of normal personality development with emphasis on the analysis of classic and contemporary theories of personality structure and dynamics. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or PSY 232. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The nature of personality theory
2. Psychoanalytic and neo-analytic perspectives
3. Trait perspectives
4. Cognitive perspectives
5. Social-behavioral perspectives
6. Humanistic perspectives
7. Constitutional perspectives
8. The future of personality psychology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the history of the study of personality and identify the major approaches to personality development. (BS 1)
2. Compare and contrast the major theoretical approaches to personality development. (BS 4)
3. Describe and analyze a model a model of personality development.
4. Explain how personality theory affects approaches to counseling and therapy. (BS 3)
5. Describe how new discoveries in psychology are influencing approaches to personality theory. (BS 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

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PSY245 Human Growth and Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 245. Human Growth and Development (3). Study of physical, intellectual, moral, emotional, personality, and social development of the human being, beginning with conception and continuing through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, and dying. Emphasis on quantitative and qualitative ways people change throughout the life span and factors which contribute to human diversity as well as to individual uniqueness. Research methods appropriate to the study of human development are also considered. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The scientific study of human growth and development across the life span from both ethological/biological ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") perspectives
2. Theories of cognitive development across the life span
3. Theories of social-emotional development across the life span

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify current and historical scientific approaches to research in human development. (BS 2,4)
2. Analyze biological theories of development.
3. Analyze theories of cognitive development. (BS 1)
4. Analyze theories of emotional development.
5. Analyze theories of social development. (BS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
PSY266 Abnormal Psychology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 266. Abnormal Psychology (3). Behavioral disorders including current terminology, theories, and research. Emphasis on the characteristics, causes and treatment of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Perspectives on abnormal behavior (History, Biological, Sociocultural, etc)
2. Stress
3. Anxiety disorders
4. Psychological factors and physical illness
5. Personality disorders
6. Substance abuse disorders
7. Sexual disorders
8. Mood disorders
9. Psychotic disorders
10. Organic mental disorders
11. Behavior disorders of childhood
12. Psychotherapies
13. Prevention

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss psychological well-being and behavioral disorders.
2. Use professional vocabulary and terminology for describing behavioral disorders and potential treatments.
3. Discuss the impact of biological, psychological, and environmental influences as complex factors that cause behavioral disorders.
4. Compare and contrast the psychological, biological, and social approaches to the treatment of abnormal behavior.
5. Review and apply current research on behavioral disorders.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
PSY277 Human Sexuality

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 277. Human Sexuality (3). Introduction to the physical, social, cognitive and cultural issues to human sexuality, includiing sexual health, gender, orientations, pathology and treatments. Examination of the facts and myths, current literature, and changing norms regarding human sexuality. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Perspectives on human sexuality
2. Research methods
3. Sexual anatomy
4. Conception, pregnancy and childbirth
5. Contraception and abortion
6. Sexually transmitted infections
7. Sexual arousal, response and technique
8. Human sexuality throughout the life span
9. Psychological theories of human sexuality
10. Sexual orientation
11. Sex roles, sex differences and sexism
12. Sexual relationships
13. Sexual dysfunctions and therapy
14. Atypical sexual behavior
15. Sexual coercion and violence
16. Commercial sex
17. Sexual laws and ethics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the importance of the social psychological influences on human sexuality. (1) (BS 1,4,5)
2. Identify the cognitive approaches to the study of human sexuality. (1,2,9) (BS 1,2)
3. Describe the structure and function of male and female reproductive organs. (3) (BS 4)
4. Analyze issues relating to conception, pregnancy, and childbirth. (4,5) (BS 4)
5. Describe the transmissions, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. (6) (BS 4)
6. Investigate social psychological issues surrounding different sexual orientations. (10-12) (BS 1,4)
7. Evaluate attitudes and the psychology that facilitate or inhibit healthy sexual development. (7-9) (BS 1)
8. Describe common sexual dysfunctions and associated therapies. (13) (BS 4)
9. Identify common atypical sexual behaviors with reference to the clinical diagnoses. (14-16) (BS 4)
10. Explain the relationships between religious, ethical, legal and moral concerns relating to human sexual behavior. (17) (BS 1,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

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SOC101 Intro to Sociology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoSOC 1101. Study of human behavior from the sociological perspective. Areas of emphasis include society, culture, social structure, social institutions, socialization, and forms of social stratification. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The sociological imagination.
2. History and development of sociology.
3. Methods of sociological research.
4. Theoretical paradigms in sociology.
5. Nature of society and the role of culture.
6. Influence of social structure and social institutions on human behavior.
7. Nature, nurture, and the socialization process.
8. Forms of social stratification and social class in America.
9. Human diversity (Race, Ethnicity, Gender)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the sociological imagination and cite examples that illustrate the significance of this perspective in understanding human behavior. (SS 1)
2. Review the historical development of sociology and discuss the contributions of key figures in the field. (SS 2)
3. Explain research methodology.
4. Evaluate the relevant perspectives, paradigms, arguments or theories.
5. Compare and contrast human societies throughout history and analyze the impact of these societies on human behavior.
6. Examine the elements of social structure and culture and explain how they influence human behavior.
7. Describe the basic social institutions and explain how these institutions influence human behavior.
8. Examine the role of nature and nurture in human behavior.
9. Analyze social stratification and social class.
10. Explain how human diversity contributes to different perspectives. (SS 4)
11. Define the relevant terminology and apply it to problems or issues. (SS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

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SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
SOC 140. Sociology of Intimate Relationships and Family (3). Study of relationships and family life, interpersonal attraction, dating and committed partnerships, relationships and household dynamics, parenting decisions, relationship longevity or dissolution. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Changing Families
a. families past & present
b. public debates & private lives
c. diversity in families (gender, race/ethnicity, social class)
2. Differing expectations & experiences by gender
a. changing gender roles
b. love, sexuality & society
c. dating & relationship commitment
d. dissolution & re-partnerships
3. Exploring challenges & solutions
a. work and family
b. parenting issues
c. dimensions of diversity (gender, race/ethnicity, social class)
d. conflict in relationships (communication, stress, violence)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and explain dynamics of interpersonal & family relationships that have a direct impact on one's own life experience. (SS 3)
2. Discuss the diverse customs, attitudes, values and expectations (by gender, race/ethnicity, social class, etc.) that affect our relationships with others. (SS 2,4)
3. Strategize and explore solutions for common relationship challenges. (SS 1)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

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SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
SOC 142. Race and Ethnic Relations (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoSOC 2215. Contemporary racial and ethnic intergroup relations emphasizing cultural origins, developments, and problems of minority groups in the United States Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Culture, ethnicity and class:
a. Characteristics of a minority group
b. Sociology and study of minority groups
c. Subordinate group status
d. Assimilation
e. Pluralism
2. Prejudice and discrimination:
a. Theories
b. Stereotypes
c. Black self-hatred: myth or reality
d. Institutional discrimination
e. Affirmative action
3. Ethnic and religious source of conflict:
a. Immigration and the United States
b. Ethnic diversity
c. Religious pluralism
d. Social class
4. Racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States:
a. Native Americans
b. Black Americans
c. Hispanic Americans
d. Asian-Americans
e. Jewish-Americans
5. Other patterns of dominance:
a. Gender roles and gender identity
b. Women: the oppressed majority
c. Multiple jeopardy: Minority women and aging
6. Beyond the United States:
a. Comparative cultures
b. Contemporary trends

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Compare how the ideologies of assimilation, cultural pluralism and conflict theory have influenced the experiences of ethical and culturally diverse populations. (SS 2)
2. Capture the development of a subordinate group status relationship and the consequences of minority group status. (SS 4)
3. Evaluate the structural, economic and personality effects of prejudice and discrimination and how these factors perpetuate social inequalities among racial/minority groups.
4. Illustrate the concepts of institutional discrimination and its impact on minority groups. (SS 1)
5. Synthesize the social issues and problems that perpetuate ethnic and religious conflict. (SS 3
6. Explain the concept of religious pluralism.
7. Identify cultural elements that are unique to racial/ethnic minority groups.
8. Review the histories of each of the minority groups in the United States.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
SOC250 Social Problems

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
SOC 250. Social Problems (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoSOC 2250. A sociological exploration of selected social problems. Emphasis on social issues. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction
a. definition of social problems
b. research methods for studying social problems
2. Problems of inequality (gender, race, class, etc)
a. social class and poverty
b. race and ethnic inequality
c. gender inequality
d. other (e.g., inequality based on age, sexual orientation)
3. Institutional problems
a. health care: problems of physical & mental illness
b. problems in education
c. the changing family
4. Selected topics (optional)
a. prostitution, pornography & the sex industry
b. alcohol & other drugs
c. crime & criminal justice
d. population, urban, problems and the environmental crisis
e. global social problems: war & terrorism

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Propose sociological approaches to social issues in society. (SS 3)
2. Review methods for collecting sociological data. (SS 1)
3. Examine the social nature of inequality (gender, race, class, etc). (SS 2)
4. Investigate the diverse types of inequality found in the American social class system, including possible solutions. (SS 4)
5. Analyze selected social problems from an institutional perspective, including possible solutions.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing and thinking skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

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1 - Students preparing for transfer must complete College Composition I & II
2 - Students preparing for transfer must complete MAT 142 or MAT 152
3 - Students must complete all Social & Human Services degree requirements prior to enrolling in PSY 296 Internship. A State of Arizona/ Dept. of Public Safety Fingerprint check must be completed prior to internship placement.

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.