Associate of Arts in Elementary Education    Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Instructional Specialist Holly Molina (928) 776-2295
Instructional Specialist Mitzi Martin (928) 776-2157
Program Director Tara O'Neill (928) 717-7621
Dean Jill Fitzgerald (928) 776-2277

Quick Facts

  • 2014-2015  Catalog Year view other years
  • Minimum Credits Required:  62
  • This program can be completed entirely online
  • Transfer Options:  Multiple - See Advisor
  • View the Degree Plan

About the Associate of Arts in Elementary Education

The vision for the Teacher Preparation Program at Yavapai College is one of a quality program that adapts to the dynamic needs of students, children, their families and the community.

The YC Teacher Education Program serves:

  1. Students interested in pursuing careers in teaching in public and private infant-grade 12 schools and Child Care Centers.
  2. Students who transfer to four year programs in Early Childhood/Elementary Education or Secondary Education.
  3. In-service teachers seeking to improve their teaching skills through additional coursework and/or professional development activities.

The Associate of Arts in Elementary Education degree requires completion of 62 credit hours. This degree is designed for students interested in elementary education who are preparing to transfer to one of the Arizona public universities to complete a baccalaureate program and qualify for an Arizona teaching certificate. 

Thirty-five hours of coursework are concentrated in general education. At Yavapai College the Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC-A) is embedded in the Associate of Arts in Elementary Education degree. Arizona General Education (AGEC) special requirements incorporate additional university requirements in Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR), Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) Awareness, and Global/International and Historical (GIH) Awareness areas. Upon completion of all 35 credit hours (including the special requirements) of the AGEC with a grade of “C” or higher, the student will receive recognition of completion on their Yavapai College transcript.

The core curriculum consists of three parts: (A) Foundation Studies include critical literacy, precise writing, qualitative thinking, and the process of analysis and synthesis that underlie logical reasoning; (B) Core Studies focus on the conceptual frameworks through which a thinker, a culture, or an academic discipline may approach an issue; (C) Area Studies link foundation skills in thinking and communicating and the core emphasis on conceptual frameworks to the content orientation of academic disciplines. Upon completion of all 35 credit hours (including the Special Requirements) of the AGEC with a grade of “C” or higher, the student will receive recognition of completion on the transcript and guaranteed transferability of the AGEC upon admission to one of the state universities in Arizona.

Three credit hours of communications coursework are required for this degree. Twenty-four credit hours of coursework in this degree are in major and elective studies and content related requirements. This aspect of the degree affords the student an opportunity to begin work on a major area of study.

Students preparing to transfer to an upper-division baccalaureate degree program should contact an advisor in the major field of study at the transfer institution in addition to meeting regularly with a faculty advisor at Yavapai College. Regular advisement is important to build an educational plan and ensure transferability of general education, elective, and major courses. Students intending to transfer to one of the Arizona public universities can obtain specific information on transferability of courses from the Course Equivalency Guide and curriculum transfer guides available from academic advisors. Transfer guides are also available from each university's web site.

Note:  

*AGEC Special Awareness Requirements Students must complete a course from each of the following areas:

  • Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR) 
  • ‚ÄčEthnic/Race/Gender (ERG) awareness
  • Global/International or Historical (GIH) awareness

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Associate of Arts in Elementary Education Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Develop a personal philosophy of education and relate it to a future career in education. (EDU 200, EDU/ECE 222, EDU/ECE 230, EDU 239)
  2. Design and present appropriate classroom activities intended to achieve specific student learning outcomes. (EDU 200, EDU/ECE 230, EDU 239)
  3. Analyze teaching styles as they relate to student learning styles. (EDU 200, EDU/ECE 222, EDU 239, MAT 156, MAT 157)
  4. Articulate the concept of multicultural education and its implementation in the public school classroom. (ECE 240, EDU 210, EDU 239)
  5. Describe how the concepts of equity and equal educational opportunity have evolved into educational policy. (ECE 240, EDU 210, EDU/ECE 222, EDU 239)
  6. Discuss society's historical identification and treatment of exceptional children and youth. (EDU/ECE 222)
  7. Explain the relative affects of parents, siblings, peers, teachers, the community, and culture on child development. (EDU/ECE 222)
 

General Educational Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education (35 credits)
  A.  Foundation Studies (9 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT142 College Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 142. College Mathematics (3). Survey of mathematical topics and applications. Includes statistics, probability, exponential functions, finance, dimensional analysis and other selected discrete math topics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Algebraic Models of Growth and Decay
2. Mathematics of Personal Finance
3. Counting and Probability
4. Descriptive Statistics and the Normal Distribution
5. Dimensional Analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create and apply linear, quadratic and exponential models. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Apply the mathematics of personal finance, including compound interest, annuities, and amortized loans. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Apply the basic rules of counting: fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply basic rules of probability including compound events, conditional probability, and expected value to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Calculate and interpret graphical and numerical summaries of data, including measures of central tendency and dispersion. (4) (QL 1-4)
6. Use the basic properties of the Normal curve to solve applied problems. (4) (QL 1-4)
7. Use dimensional analysis to make conversions with metric and U.S. measurement systems. (5) (QL 1-4)

3
OR MAT152 College Algebra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 152. College Algebra (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1151. Modeling of applications using linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Introduction to solving systems of equations using matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear Functions
2. Quadratic and other nonlinear functions
3. Exponential and logarithmic functions
4. Polynomial functions
5. Systems of equations and matrices
6. Technology in mathematics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use technology to recognize trends in data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL1-4)
2. Create suitable functions that model data using technology. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-3)
3. Analyze an application using a function developed from data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-4)
4. Add, subtract and multiply matrices in the context of an application. (5,6) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Solve a system of equations using matrices and technology. (5,6) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT167 Elementary Statistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 167. Elementary Statistics (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1160. Statistical tools and techniques used in research and general applications. Description of sample data, probability and probability distributions, point and interval estimates of population parameters, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 142 or 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Descriptive statistics
2. Probability
3. Normal distribution
4. Research design
5. Sampling strategies
6. Confidence intervals
7. Hypotheses testing of one population
8. Hypothesis testing of two population
9. Tests of categorical data
10. Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Tables
11. Regression and correlation
12. Statistics technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use both numerical and graphical methods to describe data. (1) (QL 1,3)
2. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variability. (1) (QL 1-3)
3. Compute probabilities for both simple and compound events. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply the normal distribution to probability problems and estimation of population parameters. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Critique the research methods of others, and use research methodology. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
6. Produce representative random samples. (5) (QL 1,4)
7. Calculate and interpret confidence intervals as estimates of population parameters. (6) (QL 1-4)
8. Perform hypothesis tests about means and other parameters from large and small samples using one and multiple sample methods. (7,8) (QL 1-4)
9. Test hypothesis about categorical data. (9) (QL 1-4)
10. Recognize appropriate use of Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Table tests. (10) (QL 1-3)
11. Use regression and correlation to test hypothesis and create models for bivariate data. (11) (QL 1-4)
12. Use both hand-held calculators and desktop computers to perform statistical analysis. (12) (QL 1)

3
OR MAT172 Finite Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 172. Finite Mathematics (3). Various analytic methods employed in business, social and life sciences with an emphasis on applications. Topics include algebra review, linear programming, matrix operations, linear systems of equations, set theory, counting, probability and statistics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear functions and their graphs
2. Matrices
3. Linear systems of equations
4. Linear programming
5. Set theory
6. Counting techniques
7. Probability theory
8. Statistics
9. Finance problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform elementary matrix operations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion. (2) (QL 1-3)
2. Solve n-by-m linear systems of equations using elementary row operations. (1,3) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Solve linear programming problems by graphical and algebraic techniques. (1,4) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Perform the basic operations of union, intersection and complement on sets. (5) (QL 1)
5. Use Venn diagrams, combinations and permutations in applications involving counting. (6) (QL 1)
6. Evaluate probabilities of simple, compound, independent and dependent events. (7) (QL 1-4)
7. Compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a collection of statistical data. (8) (QL 1-4)
8. Apply the theory of normal and binomial probability distributions to statistics problems. (8) (QL 1-3)
9. Compute the present value of an annuity, interest on mortgages, and cash flow. (9) (QL 1,2,4)

3
OR MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

5
OR MAT212 Survey of Calculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 212. Survey of Calculus (3). Introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, life, and social sciences. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Limits and continuity
2. Derivatives
3. The laws of differentiation
4. Integration
5. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Evaluate limits. (1) (QL 1-4)
3. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,4)
4. Determine maxima and minima of functions by applying differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,2)
5. Use calculus to analyze and graph functions. (2,5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (4,5) (QL 1,4)

3
OR MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
  B.  Core Studies (6 credits)
       1.  Historical Perspective (3 credits)
HIS131 United States History I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HIS 131. United States History I (3). Survey of social, economic, political, and cultural history from pre-Contact through the Civil War. Emphasis on conflicting interpretations of historical events and evidence. Examination of the continental approach to the development of the United States. Interpretation of the diversity of the American people and their various contributions to America's shared past. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Indigenous America
2. Columbian exchange
3. European colonization
4. Colonial society
5. Slavery and racialist thought
6. American revolution
7. Formation of a national government
8. National identity
9. Market revolution and the rise of capitalism
10. Age of Jackson
11. First & second great awakenings
12. Sectionalism
13. Reform movements
14. Abolition
15. Western expansion
16. Conflict and consensus
17. Civil war
18. Culture, ethnicity/race, class, and/or gender
19. Theories, methods, and historiography

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate historical events through different historical methods, theories, and interpretations. (1-19) (HP 1)
2. Contrast common memory to historical evidence. (1-19) (HP 3)
3. Define and utilize relevant terminology. (1-18) (HP 2)
4. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-19) (HP 4)
5. Evaluate the reliability and objectivity of various historical evidence. (1-19) (HP 5)
6. Evaluate and analyze historical issues. (1-18) (HP 6)
7. Formulate questions, make inferences, form generalizations, and draw conclusions from historical research. (1-19)
8. Create, organize, and support a thesis in written and/or oral form. (1-19) (HP 8)
9. Employ accurate and required citation format. (1-19)
10. Evaluate the issues of culture, ethnicity/race and/or gender, class and cultural diversity in the context of American history. (1-19)
11. Interpret events and actions within appropriate temporal and spatial contexts. (1-19) (HP 7)
12. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, and economic structures that contributed to the development of American history. (1-19)
13. Define and articulate the pivotal events in American history within their historical context and interpret their contributions towards change and continuity (or cause and effect) of the historical period. (1-18)
14. Analyze major constitutional issues. (5-7, 18-19)
15. Articulate the concepts of racialist thought and the concept of "race." (1-5, 8, 12-19)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 4500 words), critical reasoning, and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
       2.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
EDU 210 may not be used to fulfill this requirement
 
Show / hide all critical thinking courses

Critical Thinking Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217 Intro Argumentation and Debate   3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  C.  Area Studies (20 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (8 credits)   1
See note below for details on selection
 
Show / hide all physical & biological science courses

Physical & Biological Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biological science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AGS103 Plant Biology   4
BIO100 Biology Concepts   4
BIO103 Plant Biology   4
BIO105 Environmental Biology   4
BIO107 Introduction to Biotechnology   4
BIO108 Concepts in Plant Biology   4
BIO109 Natural History Southwest   4
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health   4
BIO160 Intro Human Anat & Physiology   4
BIO181 General Biology I   4
BIO182 General Biology II   4
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I   4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II   4
BIO205 Microbiology   4
CHM121 Environmental Chemistry   4
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry   4
CHM138 Chemistry for Allied Health   5
CHM151 General Chemistry I   5
CHM152 General Chemistry II   5
CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I   4
CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab   1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II   4
CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab   1
ENV105 Environmental Biology   4
ENV110 Environmental Geology   4
ENV121 Environmental Chemistry   4
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography   4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology   4
GLG100 Concepts in Basic Geology   2
GLG101 Intro to Geology I   4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II   4
GLG110 Environmental Geology   4
GLG116 Geology Verde Valley   2
GLG117 Implications Plate Tectonics   2
GLG118 Evolution of Basin and Range   2
GLG119 Geology of Grand Canyon   2
GLG120 Geology of Northern Arizona   2
GLG121 Volcanoes/Earthquakes N AZ   2
GLG122 Geology of Death Valley   2
GLG123 Geology of Bryce and Zion   2
GLG124 Geology of the Prescott Region   2
PHY100 Intro to Astronomy   4
PHY111 General Physics I   4
PHY112 General Physics II   4
PHY140 The Physical World   4
PHY150   
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II   5
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
        2.  Arts and Humanities (6 credits)
Choose a 3 credit hour course from the following: 
ART200 Art History I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 200. Art History I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1101. Western art from the Paleolithic Period to the Fourteenth Century. Two and three dimensional art and architecture evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Prehistoric art
2. Art of ancient civilizations
3. Art of classical antiquity
4. Early Christian, Medieval and Byzantine art
5. Romanesque art
6. Gothic art
7. Analytical writing and the oral critique
8. Application of principles and elements of design
9. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
10. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
11. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-11) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-8) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-9, 13,14) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-8,10) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western art. (1-7,11) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning, and analytical discourse through assigned writing assignments, essay examinations, journals and/or research papers.

3
ART201 Art History II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 201. Art History II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1102. Western art from the Fourteenth to the Twentieth Century. Two and three dimensional art and architecture are evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Fourteenth Century developments throughout Western Europe
2. Fifteenth Century developments throughout Western Europe art of classical antiquity
3. High Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy and Northern Europe
4. The Baroque and Rococo throughout Western Europe
5. Eighteenth Century developments in Europe and the Americas
6. Nineteenth Century European art and American landscape painting
7. The rise of modern art
8. Analytical writing and the oral critique
9. Application of principles and elements of design
10. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
11. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
12. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-7) (AH 1-4,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-7, 11,12) (AH 1,4) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1-4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western Art. (1-8,11,12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 1,2,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
ART202 History Mod/Contemp Art

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 202. History of Modern and Contemporary Art (3). Western art, craft, design and architecture from 1850 to the present. Two and three dimensional art, craft, design and architecture are evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nineteenth Century origins
2. Schools and styles of the Nineteenth Century
3. Succession movements
4. Colonialism and globalization
5. Industrial and commercial design
6. Schools and styles of the Twentieth Century
7. Contemporary schools, styles and criticism
8. Analytical writing and the oral critique
9. Application of principles and elements of design
10. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
11. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
12. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-12) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-10) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-12) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western art. (1-12) (AH 1-5 ) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (8-12) (AH 4) (GIH 1,2,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
ART203 History of Photography

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 203. History of Photography (3). World history of photography as a form of two dimensional art and visual communication. Historic and contemporary examples of photography evaluated from the origins of the medium to the present. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nineteenth Century origins
2. Technology and photographic processes
3. Photography as an art form
4. Photography as mass communication
5. Photography as documentation
6. Influence on traditional media
7. Schools and styles of the Nineteenth Century
8. Schools and styles of the Twentieth Century
9. Contemporary schools, styles and criticism
10. Analytical writing and the oral critique
11. Application of principles and elements of design
12. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of photography
13. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
14. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-14) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of photography. (1-7) (AH 1-5 ) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the development of prints. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-11) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of world art and history. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-14) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of photography in world art. (1-14) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (10-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
ENG211 Major Issues Brit Lit I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 211. Major Issues in British Literature I (3). Exploration of major artistic, historical, cultural, philosophical, gender, and genre issues represented in selected works from Medieval, Renaissance, 17th and 18th century British literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Representative individual works and authors from each period
2. Major themes and genres of each period
3. Patterns of development and influence in British literature
4. Relationships between primary works and the historical and cultural context
5. Critical analysis based upon a sampling of theoretical perspectives
6. Research and documentation techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Demonstrate curiosity and empathy in critical reading of literary texts in their historical and cultural contexts. (1,4,5) (AH 1,4)
2. Appraise the close relationship between British literature (both form and content) and historical changes in British society and culture. (4,5) (AH 2)
3. Describe broad patterns of development in British literature from its beginnings to the end of the 18th century. (1,2) (AH 5)
4. Identify the major literary themes and genres as well as some of their variations in each historical period. (2) (AH 3)
5. Develop written and oral critical analysis of significant literary texts, working from a coherent theoretical perspective. (5)
6. Apply effective research and documentation techniques when needed. (6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG212 British Lit 1798-Present

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 212. British Literature 1798 to Present (3). Exploration of major artistic, historical, cultural, philosophical, gender, and genre issues represented in selected works of British literature from 1798 to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Characteristic elements and examples of literary texts and genres (themes, structure, style, types, and analysis)
2. Factors that affect critical reading and response: issues of translation, ethnocentrism, gender, and bias/prejudice
3. Historical, geographical, cultural, ethnic, race and gender contexts for the study of British literature from 1798 to present
4. Conceptual frameworks applied to British literature from 1798 to present: definitions of culture, gender, race, and ethnicity; literary terminology; aesthetic movements
5. Information literacy skills related to independent research

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Classify, analyze and compare representative works of British literature from 1798 to present within thematic, cultural, and aesthetic frameworks. (1) (AH 1,5)
2. Analyze cultural, linguistic, historical and other factors that influence perspectives on British literature from 1798 to present, including attitudes about race, gender, and ethnicity. (2) (AH 2,3) (ERG 2,3)
3. Evaluate the role of literature in illuminating, challenging and/or perpetuating prejudice and social inequalities. (3) (AH 4) (ERG 4,5)
4. Explain and apply key terms and concepts related to literature and cultural diversity. (4) (AH 3) (ERG 1)
5. Employ tools of scholarship to communicate on issues of race, ethnicity and gender in British literature from 1798 to present. (5) (AH 5) (ERG 6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG217 Major Issues World Lit

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 217. Major Issues in World Literature (3). Investigation of major artistic, historical, ethnic, race, gender and philosophical issues in representative works of great literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Characteristic elements and examples of literary texts and genres (themes, structure, style, types and analysis)
2. Factors that affect critical reading and response: issues of translation, ethnocentrism, gender, and bias/prejudice
3. Geographical, historical, cultural, ethnic, race and gender contexts for the study of world literature.
4. Conceptual Frameworks: definitions of culture, gender, race and ethnicity; literary terminology; aesthetic movements
5. Applying information literacy skills to independent research about issues of diversity in world literature

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Classify, analyze and compare representative works of world literature within thematic, cultural and aesthetic frameworks. (1) (AH 1, 5)
2. Analyze cultural, linguistic, historical and other factors that influence perspectives on world literature and attitudes about race, gender and ethnicity. (2) (AH 2, 3) (ERG 2, 3)
3. Evaluate the role of literature in illuminating, challenging and/or perpetuating prejudice and social inequalities. (3) (AH 4), (ERG 4, 5)
4. Explain and apply key terms and concepts related to literature and cultural diversity. (4) (AH 3) (ERG 1)
5. Employ tools of scholarship (thoughtful and precise writing, critical reading, intellectual curiosity, independent thinking and intelligent discourse) to world literature and communication of issues of race, ethnicity and gender. (5) (AH 5) (ERG 6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG219 Major Issues Modern Drama

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 219. Major Issues in Modern Drama (3). Investigation of important works of world drama from 1870 to the present. Approaches that include reading and production awareness. Critical analysis of cultural, social, and political issues that have shaped and been shaped by modern plays. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Elements of production and theatricality in modern drama
2. Social, political, economic, and intellectual influences on modern drama
3. Impact of modern dramatic works on the society and culture from which they arise
4. Elements of dramatic form (such as structure, character, dialogue) in modern drama

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize aspects of theatricality and production in modern dramatic works. (1) (AH 3,5)
2. Describe adn analyze major social, political, economic, and intellectual influences on drama since 1870. (2) (AH 1,2,4)
3. Assess the impact of modern dramatic works on the society and culture from which they arise. (3) (AH 4)
4. Identify and assess, as a reader and audience, formal elements in modern dramatic works. (4) (AH 3,4,5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG237 Women in Literature

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 237. Women in Literature (3). Survey of women in literature from ancient Greece to present with emphasis on images of female protagonists as portrayed by male and female authors. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Characteristic elements of literature (theme, figurative language, characterization) and introduction to genres (essay, poetry, short sotry, novel)
2. Tools and methods of literary criticism and scholarly research
3. Geographical, historical, and social influences on women's literature including issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality
4. Historical portraits of women from selected time periods with emphasis on images of female protagonists as portrayed by male and female writers
5. Archetypal approach to the study of portraits of women by male and female writers

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define key literary terms, and apply them to the study of selected works of women's literature from a variety of genres. (1) (AH 3)
2. Apply the tools and methods of literary criticism and scholarly research to selected works of women's literature. (2) (AH 4)
3. Discuss and analyze geographical, historical, and social influences on women's literature, including issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. (3) (AH 2)
4. Analyze historical portrayals of female protagonists in literature. (4) (AH 1,5)
5. Identify the various archetypal patterns of women throughout history and literary periods. (5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG238 Literature of Southwest

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 238. Literature of the Southwest (3). A study of the literature, land and peoples of the American Southwest using the tools of literary criticism and including issues of race, ethnicity, gender, history, philosophy and geography. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 102. Reading Proficiency. Three Lecture. A-F grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Tools and methods of literary criticism and scholarly research
2. Key literary terms such as: genre, theme, symbol, figurative language, imagery, setting, point of view and characterization
3. Geographical, historical, and environmental influences on Southwest literature
4. Social and cultural influences on Southwestern literature, including issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity and sexuality
5. Conceptual frameworks and context as a means for discussing Southwest literature as a microcosm for universal human experiences and problems including: gender-discrimination, racial prejudice and ethnocentrism

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the tools and methods of literary criticism and scholarly research to selected works of Southwest literature from a variety of genres. (1) (AH 4,6)
2. Define key literary terms and apply them to the study of selected works of Southwest literature. (2) (AH 1, 3)
3. Discuss and analyze geographical, historical and environmental influences on Southwest literature. (3) (AH 1,2,5) (ERG 3)
4. Discuss, define and analyze social and cultural influences on Southwest literature including issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity and sexuality and focusing on interactions between Native American, Anglo and Spanish-Mexican cultures. (4) (ERG 1,2,4,6)
5. Apply conceptual frameworks to the study of Southwest literature to facilitate discussion of literature as a microcosm for human experiences and problems including: gender-discrimination, racial prejudice and ethnocentrism. (5) (ERG 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2,500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG240 American Lit to 1865

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 240. American Literature to 1865 (3). Exploration of major artistic, historical, philosophical, cultural and gender issues represented in selected works from the Colonial era to the Civil War Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Characteristic elements and examples of literary texts and genres (themes, structure, style, types and analysis)
2. Factors that affect critical reading and response: issues of translation, ethnocentrism, gender, and bias/prejudice
3. The historical, religious, geographical, cultural, ethnic, race and gender contexts for the study of American literature before 1865
4. Conceptual frameworks applied to American literature from 1865 to present: definitions of culture, gender, race and ethnicity; literary terminology; aesthetic movements such as Romanticism, Trancendentalism and the literature of abolition
5. Information literacy skills related to independent research

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Classify, analyze and compare representative works of American literature from before 1865 within thematic, cultural and aesthetic frameworks. (1) (AH 1,5)
2. Analyze cultural, linguistic, historical and other factors that influence perspectives on American literature before 1865, including attitudes about race, gender and ethnicity. (2) (AH 1,2,4) (ERG 2,3)
3. Evaluate the role of literature in illuminating, challenging and/or perpetuating prejudice and social inequalities. (3) (AH 2) (ERG 4,5)
4. Explain and apply key terms and concepts related to literature and cultural diversity. (4) (AH 3) (ERG 1)
5. Employ tools of scholarship on issues of race, ethnicity and gender to American literature from before 1865. (5) (AH 4) (ERG 6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2,500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG241 American Lit 1865 to Present

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 241. American Literature 1865 to Present (3). Exploration of major artistic, historical, philosophical, cultural and gender issues represented in selected works from the Civil War to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Characteristic elements and examples of literary texts and genres (themes, structure, style, types and analysis).
2. Factors that affect critical reading and response: issues of translation, ethnocentrism, gender, and bias/prejudice.
3. Historical, geographical, cultural, ethnic, race and gender contexts for the study of American literature from 1865 to present.
4. Conceptual frameworks applied to American literature from 1865 to present: definitions of culture, gender, race and ethnicity; literary terminology; aesthetic movements.
5. Information literacy skills related to independent research.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Classify, analyze and compare representative works of American literature from 1865 to present within thematic, cultural and aesthetic frameworks. (1) (AH 1,5)
2. Analyze cultural, linguistic, historical and other factors that influence perspectives on American literature from 1865 to present, including attitudes about race, gender and ethnicity. (2) (AH 2,3) (ERG 2,3)
3. Evaluate the role of literature in illuminating, challenging and/or perpetuating prejudice and social inequalities. (3) (AH 4), (ERG 4,5)
4. Explain and apply key terms and concepts related to literature and cultural diversity. (4) (AH 3) (ERG 1)
5. Employ tools of scholarship on issues of race, ethnicity and gender to American literature from 1865 to present. (5) (AH 5) (ERG 6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2,500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG242 Intro to Shakespeare

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 242. Introduction to Shakespeare (3). An examination, through close reading, critical analysis and research, of six to eight Shakespearean plays, selected sonnets and poems as well as an investigation into the cultural and historical settings from which his work emerged. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The role of literature and drama in humanistic learning
2. Selected plays, sonnets, and poems
3. Examination of the cultural/historical context which shaped Shakespeare's art
4. Information regarding Shakespeare's life
5. Published critical analyses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Classify Shakespeare's plays and poems into stylistic groupings of comedies, tragedies, histories, problem plays, sonnets and lyric poetry. (2,3) (AH 1-3)
2. Analyze influences (such as historical, political, economic, social, cultural, religious and environmental) of Renaissance England to the development of theatre, plays and poetry. (3) (AH 1-5)
3. Define and use key terms appropriate to the historical and literary period for this genre. (1-5) (AH 1-3)
4. Develop and support personal and reasonable positions on Shakespearean issues discovered through critically analyzing Shakespearean scholarship, his works, his life and times and by examining various theatrical interpretations of the script including re-enacting a portion of one of the plays. (1-5) (AH 1,2,4)
5. Engage in discussions that cultivate curiosity and empathy in the pursuit of humanistic insights and knowledge of the times, Shakespeare and other contributing playwrights. (1-4) (AH 1-4)
6. Recognize the contributions of Shakespeare as a universal landmark of human achievement by applying his concepts and language to current circumstances. (1) (Ah 1-5)
7. Identify other major contributors and contributions to the Elizabethan Renaissance arts and literature and compare them to the works of Shakespeare. (1-5) (AH 1-5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
ENG298 Special Topics in Literature

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 298. Special Topics in Literature (3). Investigation of major artistic, historical and philosophical issues in representative works of literature within topic or genre. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the course topic or genre
2. Terms related to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts
3. Criticism, reviews and other writings associated with the literary topic and texts
4. Strategies and materials for researching literary topic and texts

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe and discuss the history and evolution of the literary topic. (1) (AH 1,2,5)
2. Define and apply terms relating to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. (2) (AH 3)
3. Discuss criticism, reviews and other writings associated with the literary topic and texts. (3) (AH 2,4,5)
4. Locate and use library and internet information about the literary topic and texts. (4) (AH 4,5)

3
HUM202 Introduction to Mythology
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 202. Introduction to Mythology (3). Examination of humanist questions through European and Non-Western mythologies. Issues include: creation of the world, cosmology, fertility/sexuality, human nature, the problem of evil, death, nature of gods/goddesses/God, and the natural world. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Classical mythology
2. Myth systems of world cultures, including those of Europe, Native America, Asia, Africa and Oceania
3. Nature of symbol and allegory in myth and traditional narratives
4. Various academic approaches to the study of myth, including linguistic, cultural, phenomenological, psychological, structural and perennialist
5. Dynamic relationship of mythology with science and other human disciplines

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Accurately employ the terminology and concepts of the study of mythology (3,4) (AH 3)
2. Describe and discuss the characteristics, similarities and differences of major world mythologies (1-3, 5) (AH 1)
3. Identify, compare and critique major contributors and analytic theories in the study of mythology. (4) (AH 4)
4. Articulate and analyze the ways in which mythology influences and is influenced by culture, behavior and belief both in the past and present (1,2,4,5) (AH 2)
5. Locate, evaluate and reference valid and credible sources of information relating to myths and mythology studies (1-5) (AH 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.
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HUM205 Technology and Human Values

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 205. Technology and Human Values (3). Explores the relationship between technological development and individual and social values in the Western World from ancient times through the present. Includes technologies connected with a variety of areas, such as medicine, the military, architecture, food and agricultural production, and labor relations. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The development, over time, of a variety of technologies, such as those related to computers, architecture, medicine, the military, communications, and food and agricultural production.
2. Current cutting edge technology: its development and relation to contemporary social values.
3. Ethical and values systems including aesthetics as well as community, family, and economic systems.
4. Techniques to critique the written word and the moving visual image.
5. Relationships among society, values, and technology.
6. Historical and contemporary view of the consequences of technological development on social institutions such as religion, family, workplace, and politics.
7. Impact of technology on individual lives.
8. Impact of technology on organizational structures.
9. Information technologies
10.Practices and strategies of research.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Trace the development of selected technologies over time. (1) (AH 1,5)
2. Analyze the way that contemporary issues affect selected technologies over time. (2,3,6) (AH 1,2)
3. Discuss historical and contemporary views of the consequences of a selected technology on institutions such as religion, family, workplace, and politics. (5) (AH 1,2)
4. Analyze the relationships among society, values, and technology. (4) (AH 2)
5. Navigate library data bases to conduct research. (10) (AH 4)
6. Employ integrity, curiosity, and empathy in information gathering and reporting. (4,10) (AH 4)
7. Research and critique articles from current published sources examining the sources' political/social message and intended audience, as well as individual authors/biases, the quality of their research, and the readability, relevance, and reliability of their work. (4,10) (AH 4)
8. Identify and analyze (orally and in writing) universal concerns connected to the moral and ethical considerations that may accompany technological innovations, especially as they relate to community, family, aesthetics, and economic systems. (3,5,6,8) (AH 2)
9. Describe how cutting edge technological innovation is related to contemporary social values. (2,9)
10. Articulate a coherent center of values and an integrated understanding of technology as it relates to students' lives and environments. (5,7) (AH 3)
11. Analyze visual presentations, describing how authors use cinematic techniques to present messages and values-related issues to produce desired effects in the audience. (4)
12. Present bibliography citations. (10)
13. Present research from multiple sources combining it into a unified presentation documenting and analyzing the social and values-related implications of a selected technology. (10) (AH 4,5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.
2. In-class oral presentations.
3. Reflective, cumulative learning portfolio.

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HUM236 American Arts & Ideas

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 236. American Arts and Ideas (3). Cultural history of the United States from the Eighteenth Century to the present. Scholarly examination of the literature, philosophy, music, visual arts, and architecture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1.The creation of a national identity
2. Regionalism in United States cultural history
3. Great awakenings and religious movements
4. Social and political reform movements
5. Issues of gender, race and class in the United States
6. The influence of the environment and the economy on the culture of the United States
7. Theories, methods and scholarly writing in cultural history

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and classify ideas and artifacts within their respective historical and regional contexts. (5-7) (AH 1)
2. Identify, analyze, and evaluate the diverse influences on the ideas and artifacts created in the United States from the Eighteenth Century to the present. (1-6) (AH 2)
3. Identify, analyze and synthesize the relationship between historical events and cultural response. (6) (AH 4)
4. Employ relevant terminology in oral and/or written arguments. (1-7) (AH 3)
5. Identify, analyze, and evaluate major contributors and their contributions to the cultural history of the United States. (7) (AH 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

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HUM241 Humanities Western World I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 241. Humanities in the Western World I (3) Cultural history of Western Civilization from Ancient Civilizations to the Fourteenth Century. Scholarly examination of the literature, philosophy, music, visual arts, and architecture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Neolithic revolutions and ancient civilizations
2. Classical Antiquity and Byzantium
3. Religious and philosophical traditions
4. Early Christian and Medieval Europe
5. Western aesthetic: the Classical and Abstract Transcendental
6. Issues of gender, race and class in the Western civilization
7. The influence of the environment and the economy on Western culture
8. Theories, methods and scholarly writing in cultural history

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and classify ideas and artifacts within their respective historical and regional contexts. (1-4) (AH 1)
2. Identify, analyze, and evaluate the diverse influences on the ideas and artifacts created in the Western Civilizations from the Neolithic to Fourteenth Century. (1-4) (AH 2)
3. Identify, analyze and synthesize the relationship between historical events and cultural response. (5-7) (AH 4)
4. Employ relevant terminology in oral and/or written arguments. (1-8) (AH 3)
5. Identify, analyze, and evaluate major contributors and their contributions to the cultural history of the Western World. (8) (AH 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

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HUM242 Humanities West World II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 242. Humanities in the Western World II (3). Cultural history of Western Civilization from Fifteenth to late Twentieth Century. Scholarly examination of the literature, philosophy, music, visual arts, and architecture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1.Renaissance as threshold to Modern World
2. Religious and philosophical reformations and revolutions
3. Western aesthetic traditions in art and literature
4. The influence of regionalism and nationalism on Western culture
5. The influence of the environment and the economy on Western culture
6. Issues of gender, race and class in the Western Civilization
7. Theories, methods and scholarly writing in cultural history

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and classify ideas and artifacts within their respective historical and regional contexts. (1-3) (AH 1)
2. Identify, analyze, and evaluate the diverse influences on the ideas and artifacts created in the Western Civilizations from the Renaissance to the late Twentieth Century. (4-6) (AH 2)
3. Identify, analyze and synthesize the relationship between historical events and cultural response. (1-7) (AH 4)
4. Employ relevant terminology in oral and/or written arguments. (1-7) (AH 3)
5. Identify, analyze, and evaluate major contributors and their contributions to the cultural history of the Modern Western World. (7) (AH 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
HUM243 History of Film

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 243. History of Film (3) (Fall). Historical and critical survey of the development of film as an art form, as a system of representation and communication, and as an industry from its invention to the present day. How films work technically, aesthetically, and culturally to create and reinforce social norms. Cross listed with THR 243. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the development of film as a communications medium and an art form
2. History of the development of various film industries world-wide seen in historic, geographic and political contexts
3. Film genres and classifications seen within historical and stylistic contexts
4. Cinematic techniques and technologies in relation to spectators' receptions and interpretations
5. Film as seen by various thinkers and disciplines
6. Representations in films
7. Politics in film
8. The social function of film
9. Analyzing and critiquing film

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze the historical development of film as a communications medium and as an art form. (1) (AH1,2)
2. Discuss the development of film industries in historic, geographic, and political contexts. (2) (AH1,2)
3. Classify films and specify genres within their historical and stylistic contexts. (3) (AH1,3)
4. Relate cinematic techniques and technologies to spectators' receptions and interpretations. (4) (AH3-5)
5. Connect cinema to the systems of various important thinkers and disciplines. (5) (AH5)
6. Investigate the use of representations in films. (6) (AH 4-5)
7. Relate film to political settings. (7) (AH2)
8. Determine and analyze the social function of various films. (8) (AH2, 4-5)
9. Analyze and critique films. (9) (AH3-5)
10. Engage in informed, dialectic discussion regarding the various aspects of films and film production. (1-10) (AH1-4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

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HUM248 Introduction to Folklore

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 248. Introduction to Folklore (3). A cross-cultural introduction to the study of folklore. Focuses on the ways individuals and groups use artistic expression in everyday life - including storytelling, beliefs, songs, speech, dance, celebrations and artifacts - to address issues of identity, community, and tradition. Cross listed with ANT 248. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Definition of folklore and examination of folkloric behavior and artifacts around the world
2. Genres of folklore in narrative, speech, belief, performance and art
3. Folklore theories and scholarship
4. Methods of folklore investigation, including fieldwork
5. Use of artistic expression in establishing individual and group identity, authenticity and authority
6. Stability and change in tradition

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Distinguish folkloric behavior and artifacts from other aspects of human culture. (1, 2) (AH 1, 3)
2. Identify and associate specific examples of folklore with cross-cultural categories of human social behavior. (1-3, 5, 6) (AH 2)
3. Justify the value of fieldwork in investigating human behavior. (3, 4) (AH 5)
4. Document and interpret the presence of folklore in everyday life. (1-6) (AH 4)
5. Describe and interpret the twin processes of conservation and change in the creation and transmission of folklore. (3, 6) (AH 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
HUM250 American Cinema

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 250. American Cinema (3). Survey of American film as an art form, an industry, and a system of representation and communication. Technical, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of cinema and the reading of film as a means for communicating American ideals, values and attitudes. This course is cross-listed with THR 250. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Development of the American film industry
2. Film vocabulary
3. Cinematic art and technology
4. Hollywood film genres
5. Film analysis and critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the key events of American film history from the silent cinema to the present day. (1) (AH 1, 5)
2. Use the basic technical and critical vocabulary of motion pictures. (2) (AH 3)
3. Analyze the relationship between the technologies of cinema and film art. (3) (AH 2)
4. Explain the role of genre in American film history as it relates to the expression of American ideals, values and idenity. (4) (AH 1,3)
5. Analyze and critique American films. (5) (AH 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT: Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words.

3
HUM260 Intercultural Perspectives

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
HUM 260. Intercultural Perspectives (3). Cultural, literary, and artistic expressions of Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, African American, and Asian Americans. Includes both traditional and modern work, issues of race, gender and ethnicity and contribution to American civilization. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical forces and social systems of American society that have shaped the experience of minorities in the United States, including issues of race, gender and ethnicity
2. Significant Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American artists and writers
3. Importance and influence of traditional cultural artistry on the works of Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American artists and writers
4. Influence of Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American art and writing on the American artistic tradition

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Articulate the historical forces and social systems that shaped the cultures of Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American artists and writers, including issues of race, gender and ethnicity. (1) (AH 2) (ERG 1, 3, 5)
2. Identify significant innovators, themes and techniques in the art of Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American communities. (2) (AH 5) (ERG 2)
3. Compare traditional and modern works of Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American artists and writers in order to trace the influence of cultural traditions on modern artistic expression. (3) (AH 1,4) (ERG 4)
4. Explain the influence of Native American, Hispanic American, African American and Asian American artists and writers on American art and culture. (4) (AH 3) (ERG 6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT: Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words.

3
MUS240 Music Appreciation

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 240. Music Appreciation (3). Explores the common elements of rhythm, melody, harmony, and form as they connect with the heritage of human understanding. Examines issues of universal human concern that are reflected in all styles of music from folk to classical. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony, timbre, form
2. Styles of music: folk, popular, jazz, and classical art music
3. Influences within major historic periods (i.e. medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary)
4. Representative composers and their compositions from the major periods and styles
5. Cultural issues expressed through the production of music in Western societies

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply a designated vocabulary of terms to describe common elements of music. (1) (AH 3)
2. Use listening skills essential for perception of music by comparing and differentiating numerous musical examples taken from standard music literature. (2-4)
3. Describe the stylistic differences between music of the major historical musical periods of Western culture. (2,3) (AH 1)
4. Identify music of the folk and popular traditions, and compare these styles with classical art music. (2)
5. Identify and classify major composers of both classical literature and music of the popular traditions. (3,4) (AH 5)
6. Discuss and analyze the connection between musical aesthetic principles and the cultural and historical context from which musical compositions derive. (3,5) (AH 2)
7. Examine and discuss universal (moral, spiritual, intellectual, and aesthetic) issues expressed through the production of music in Western societies. (3,5)
8. Identify, interpret, evaluate and synthesize stylistic characteristics as they apply to contrasting world views through musical compositions. (2,4,5) (AH 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of evaluated writing.

3
MUS245 Music of World Cultures

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 245. Music of World Cultures (3). Cultural and historical ethnic music contributions throughout the world. Social, cultural and spiritual factors affecting music. Emphasis on listening skills, style characteristics, properties of sound and elements of music on various instruments. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Development of aural (listening skills)
2. Properties of sound and elements of music
3. Classification and methods of producing sound on various instruments
4. Cultural contributions to music from around the world
5. Style characteristics of different ethnic cultures
6. Social, cultural and spiritual value of music in world

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize and classify cultural and ethnic music examples. (1) (AH 5)
2. Describe properties of sound. (2) (AH 3)
3. Identify, compare and contrast use of various instruments to achieve characteristic sounds. (3) (AH 5)
4. Research and discuss the value of music in world cultures. (4) (AH 4)
5. Identify basic patterns of style for specific cultures or historical time periods. (5) (AH 1)
6. Analyze social, cultural, and spiritual environmental factors influencing the development of music in specific cultures. (6) (AH 2)


REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
PHI245 Intro Eastern Philosophy

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHI 245. Introduction to Eastern Philosophy (3). Examination of fundamental theories of Indian, Chinese, and Japanese metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to Eastern conceptions of philosophy and metaphysics and comparison with the Western philosophical tradition
2. Chinese traditions: General features and historical considerations
3. Confucianism
4. Taoism
5. Neo-Confucianism
6. Mao-Tse-tung
7. Indian philosophy; general features and historical considerations
8. Vedas
9. Upanishads
10. Buddhist philosophies: general feature and historical considerations
11. Nature of self
12. Nature of reality
13. Zen Buddhism
14. Eastern/Western cross fertilization

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Classify concepts and discuss major themes of three great traditions in Oriental thought within a broad cultural and historical context. (2-13)
2. Analyze influences, including spiritual, historical, political, cultural and environmental factors as they relate to the arts and humanities. (1-14)
3. Define and use key terms appropriate to the discipline. (1-14)
4. Explain how different Eastern philosophies consider fundamental questions including the nature of universe; the nature of human existence; what constitutes the good life; how one determines truth regarding these issues. (2-13)
5. Critically analyze answers to philosophical questions, and formulate personal and responsible views. (1,14)
6. Engage in dialectical discussions that exhibit evidence of intellectual curiosity and scholarship. (1-14)
7. Identify, compare and critique major contributors and contributions. (2-14)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
REL201 Comparative Religions

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
REL 201. Comparative Religions (3). The world's religions from East and West, both old and new. Focus on differing religious/philosophical conceptual frameworks. Nonliterate and primal religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Japanese religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Baha'i and more recent religions. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The nature of religious experience; philosophy and challenges of comparing religions
2. Nonliterate and primal peoples' religions
3. India's religious traditions: Hinduism
4. Buddhism
5. China's religious traditions: Confucianism
6. Taoism
7. Japan's religious traditions: Confucianism
8. Zen
9. Near Eastern religious traditions: Judaism
10. Christianity
11. Islam
12. Baha'i faith
13. More recent world religions
14. Religious pluralism

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Cultivate curiosity, empathy, and understanding of differing religious conceptual frameworks. (1) (AH 4)
2. Identify, interpret, evaluate, and synthesize insights from the differing religious/philosophical conceptual frameworks. (1-14) (AH 3,5)
3. Develop an awareness and understanding of the cultural heritage of humankind by examining issues of universal human concern (metaphysical, spiritual, moral, and intellectual). (1-14) (AH 1-3)
4. Develop critical reasoning skills in relation to matter over which reasonable people disagree. (1) (AH 4)
5. Enhance competence and performance of thoughtful and precise writing skills, of oral presentation skills, and of independent thinking.
6. Identify basic assumptions and unexamined ideas, and to consider alternatives.
7. Participate in an open-minded, well-informed, non-dogmatic atmosphere for learning and discussion.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
REL203 Native Religions of the World

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
REL 203. Native Religions of the World (3). Examination of the kinds of religious experience found among native aboriginal peoples (often called "tribal" or "indigenous" peoples). Analysis of the religious traditions of both modern and archaic native peoples and the relationship of their religious experience to other forms of experience (social, economic, political, and cultural). Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the terms "native," "aboriginal," "tribal," and "indigenous" in the history of the study of religions
2. Theories of religion as they have been applied to native cultures
3. Analysis of several native religious traditions
4. Effects of colonialism on native religions
5. Native religions in the modern world
6. Appropriation of native religious traditions by outside groups

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss theories of religion and apply them to native religious traditions. (1-3) (AH 3,5)
2. Place religious traditions within the larger scope of their native cultures. (2,3) (AH 2)
3. Compare and contrast different native religious traditions. (3) (AH 4)
4. Trace the evolution of a native tradition as it interacted with a non-native tradition. (3,4,6) (AH 2)
5. Analyze native traditions within their contemporary environment. (5) (AH 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
REL273 Introduction to Jewish Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
REL 273. Introduction to Jewish Studies (3). Dimensions and concerns of Jewish civilization historically and in contemporary times. Continuities and discontinuities, secular and religious expressions of Jewish culture, concepts, and ideals; sense of human place, purpose, communal and personal life; influence of Jewish thought on other religious and secular cultures; modern concepts and challenges. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to Jewish culture
2. Historical overview: major periods of Jewish civilization
3. Ancient antecedents and influences: Near East and Hellenism
4. Diaspora and rabbinic Judaism
5. Medieval period and "Golden Age"--Jewish philosophy and mysticism; interaction with Islam and Christian Europe
6. Early modern period and challenges of emancipation
7. Post-Holocaust issues: religious existentialism, Zionism, and transformation of Jewish identity
8. Judaism as living religion and culture
9. Contemporary challenges: Jewish feminism; assimilation, secularism
10. Interaction and mutual influences
11. Varieties of Judaisms
12. Basic aspects of living the Jewish path

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Trace development of the varieties of Jewish expression from Near East origins through contemporary times. (1-12) (AH 2)
2. Outline various periods of Jewish history/religion/culture as part of a broader social, historical, political and religious context. (2-9)
3. Describe the nature of and central tenets of Judaism. (12)
4. Classify concepts within their historical contexts. (2-7) (AH 1)
5. Discuss how other religious traditions and secular cultures have impacted and influenced Jewish civilization. (10)
6. Participate in an interreligious and intercultural dialog by engaging in dialectical discussions that exhibit evidence of intellectual curiosity and scholarship. (1-12) (AH 4)
7. Compare perspectives of other cultures, especially minority cultures. (8-11)
8. Critically review materials from primary and secondary sources and place them in appropriate historical/cultural contexts. (1-12) (AH 5)
9. Compare and analyze disparate ideas by defining and using key terms appropriate to the discipline. (10-12) (AH 3)
10. Identify a variety of cultural traditions and compare and contrast the characteristics of diverse cultures and traditions. (2-12)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing a minimum of 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
THR243 History of Film

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
THR 243. History of Film (3). Historical and critical survey of the development of film as an art form, as a system of representation and communication, and as an industry from its invention to the present day. How films work technically, aesthetically, and culturally to create and reinforce social norms. Cross listed with HUM 243. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the development of film as a communications medium and an art form
2. History of the development of various film industries world-wide seen in historic, geographic and political contexts
3. Film genres and classifications seen within historical and stylistic contexts
4. Cinematic techniques and technologies in relation to spectators' receptions and interpretations
5. Film as seen by various thinkers and disciplines
6. Representations in films
7. Politics in film
8. The social function of film
9. Analyzing and critiquing film

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze the historical development of film as a communications medium and as an art form. (1) (AH1, AH2)
2. Discuss the development of film industries in historic, geographic, and political contexts. (2) (AH1, AH2)
3. Classify films and specify genres within their historical and stylistic contexts. (3) (AH1, AH3)
4. Relate cinematic techniques and technologies to spectators' receptions and interpretations. (4) (AH3-5)
5. Connect cinema to the systems of various important thinkers and disciplines. (5) (AH6)
6. Investigate the use of representations in films. (6) (AH 4-5)
7. Relate film to political settings. (7) (AH2)
8. Determine and analyze the social function of various films. (8) (AH2, AH4-5)
9. Analyze and critique films. (9) (AH3-5)
10. Engage in informed, dialectic discussion regarding the various aspects of films and film production. (1-10) (AH1-6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
THR250 American Cinema

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
THR 250. American Cinema (3). Survey of American film as an art form, an industry, and a system of representation and communication. Technical, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of cinema and the reading of film as a means for communicating American ideals, values and attitudes. This course is cross-listed with HUM 250. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Development of the American film industry
2. Film vocabulary
3. Cinematic art and technology
4. Hollywood film genres
5. Film analysis and critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the key events of American film history from the silent cinema to the present day. (1) (AH 1, 6)
2. Use the basic technical and critical vocabulary of motion pictures. (2) (AH 3)
3. Analyze the relationship between the technologies of cinema and film art. (3) (AH 2, 5)
4. Explain the role of genre in American film history as it relates to the expression of American ideals, values and idenity. (4) (AH 1,2)
5. Analyze and critique American films. (5) (AH 4, 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT: Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words.

3
Choose a different 3 credit hour course from the following:
ART200 Art History I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 200. Art History I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1101. Western art from the Paleolithic Period to the Fourteenth Century. Two and three dimensional art and architecture evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Prehistoric art
2. Art of ancient civilizations
3. Art of classical antiquity
4. Early Christian, Medieval and Byzantine art
5. Romanesque art
6. Gothic art
7. Analytical writing and the oral critique
8. Application of principles and elements of design
9. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
10. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
11. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-11) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-8) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-9, 13,14) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-8,10) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western art. (1-7,11) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning, and analytical discourse through assigned writing assignments, essay examinations, journals and/or research papers.

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ART201 Art History II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 201. Art History II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1102. Western art from the Fourteenth to the Twentieth Century. Two and three dimensional art and architecture are evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Fourteenth Century developments throughout Western Europe
2. Fifteenth Century developments throughout Western Europe art of classical antiquity
3. High Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy and Northern Europe
4. The Baroque and Rococo throughout Western Europe
5. Eighteenth Century developments in Europe and the Americas
6. Nineteenth Century European art and American landscape painting
7. The rise of modern art
8. Analytical writing and the oral critique
9. Application of principles and elements of design
10. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
11. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
12. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-7) (AH 1-4,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-7, 11,12) (AH 1,4) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1-4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western Art. (1-8,11,12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 1,2,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

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ART202 History Mod/Contemp Art

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 202. History of Modern and Contemporary Art (3). Western art, craft, design and architecture from 1850 to the present. Two and three dimensional art, craft, design and architecture are evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nineteenth Century origins
2. Schools and styles of the Nineteenth Century
3. Succession movements
4. Colonialism and globalization
5. Industrial and commercial design
6. Schools and styles of the Twentieth Century
7. Contemporary schools, styles and criticism
8. Analytical writing and the oral critique
9. Application of principles and elements of design
10. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
11. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
12. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-12) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-10) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-12) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western art. (1-12) (AH 1-5 ) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (8-12) (AH 4) (GIH 1,2,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

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ART203 History of Photography

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 203. History of Photography (3). World history of photography as a form of two dimensional art and visual communication. Historic and contemporary examples of photography evaluated from the origins of the medium to the present. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nineteenth Century origins
2. Technology and photographic processes
3. Photography as an art form
4. Photography as mass communication
5. Photography as documentation
6. Influence on traditional media
7. Schools and styles of the Nineteenth Century
8. Schools and styles of the Twentieth Century
9. Contemporary schools, styles and criticism
10. Analytical writing and the oral critique
11. Application of principles and elements of design
12. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of photography
13. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
14. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-14) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of photography. (1-7) (AH 1-5 ) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the development of prints. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-11) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of world art and history. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-14) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of photography in world art. (1-14) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (10-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
MUS240 Music Appreciation

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 240. Music Appreciation (3). Explores the common elements of rhythm, melody, harmony, and form as they connect with the heritage of human understanding. Examines issues of universal human concern that are reflected in all styles of music from folk to classical. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony, timbre, form
2. Styles of music: folk, popular, jazz, and classical art music
3. Influences within major historic periods (i.e. medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary)
4. Representative composers and their compositions from the major periods and styles
5. Cultural issues expressed through the production of music in Western societies

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply a designated vocabulary of terms to describe common elements of music. (1) (AH 3)
2. Use listening skills essential for perception of music by comparing and differentiating numerous musical examples taken from standard music literature. (2-4)
3. Describe the stylistic differences between music of the major historical musical periods of Western culture. (2,3) (AH 1)
4. Identify music of the folk and popular traditions, and compare these styles with classical art music. (2)
5. Identify and classify major composers of both classical literature and music of the popular traditions. (3,4) (AH 5)
6. Discuss and analyze the connection between musical aesthetic principles and the cultural and historical context from which musical compositions derive. (3,5) (AH 2)
7. Examine and discuss universal (moral, spiritual, intellectual, and aesthetic) issues expressed through the production of music in Western societies. (3,5)
8. Identify, interpret, evaluate and synthesize stylistic characteristics as they apply to contrasting world views through musical compositions. (2,4,5) (AH 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of evaluated writing.

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MUS245 Music of World Cultures

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 245. Music of World Cultures (3). Cultural and historical ethnic music contributions throughout the world. Social, cultural and spiritual factors affecting music. Emphasis on listening skills, style characteristics, properties of sound and elements of music on various instruments. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Development of aural (listening skills)
2. Properties of sound and elements of music
3. Classification and methods of producing sound on various instruments
4. Cultural contributions to music from around the world
5. Style characteristics of different ethnic cultures
6. Social, cultural and spiritual value of music in world

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize and classify cultural and ethnic music examples. (1) (AH 5)
2. Describe properties of sound. (2) (AH 3)
3. Identify, compare and contrast use of various instruments to achieve characteristic sounds. (3) (AH 5)
4. Research and discuss the value of music in world cultures. (4) (AH 4)
5. Identify basic patterns of style for specific cultures or historical time periods. (5) (AH 1)
6. Analyze social, cultural, and spiritual environmental factors influencing the development of music in specific cultures. (6) (AH 2)


REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
THR135 Intro to Theater

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
THR 135. Introduction to the Theater (3). Development of theatre in Europe and America from ancient Greece to present. Integrated approach to theatre including playwriting, architecture, acting, production and criticism, particularly in historical settings. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Overview: theatre crafts--acting, directing, playwriting, and design
2. Foundations: magic, dance, ritual, religion
3. Theatre history: Greek, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance and Shakespeare, Social Theatre, Romantic, Realistic, and Contemporary
4. Connections to society, economy, and other arts
5. Theater analysis and critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1.Classify historical and stylistic concepts and artifacts of the theater. (1-3) (AH 1)
2. Analyze historical, religious, economic and cultural influences on the development of theater as an art form. (2-4) (AH 2)
3. Examine and critically analyze significant and representative dramatic productions. (1, 5) (AH 3, 4)
4. Identify, compare and critique major contributors and contributions to theater. (3, 4) (AH 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

3
THR243 History of Film

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
THR 243. History of Film (3). Historical and critical survey of the development of film as an art form, as a system of representation and communication, and as an industry from its invention to the present day. How films work technically, aesthetically, and culturally to create and reinforce social norms. Cross listed with HUM 243. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the development of film as a communications medium and an art form
2. History of the development of various film industries world-wide seen in historic, geographic and political contexts
3. Film genres and classifications seen within historical and stylistic contexts
4. Cinematic techniques and technologies in relation to spectators' receptions and interpretations
5. Film as seen by various thinkers and disciplines
6. Representations in films
7. Politics in film
8. The social function of film
9. Analyzing and critiquing film

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze the historical development of film as a communications medium and as an art form. (1) (AH1, AH2)
2. Discuss the development of film industries in historic, geographic, and political contexts. (2) (AH1, AH2)
3. Classify films and specify genres within their historical and stylistic contexts. (3) (AH1, AH3)
4. Relate cinematic techniques and technologies to spectators' receptions and interpretations. (4) (AH3-5)
5. Connect cinema to the systems of various important thinkers and disciplines. (5) (AH6)
6. Investigate the use of representations in films. (6) (AH 4-5)
7. Relate film to political settings. (7) (AH2)
8. Determine and analyze the social function of various films. (8) (AH2, AH4-5)
9. Analyze and critique films. (9) (AH3-5)
10. Engage in informed, dialectic discussion regarding the various aspects of films and film production. (1-10) (AH1-6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
THR250 American Cinema

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
THR 250. American Cinema (3). Survey of American film as an art form, an industry, and a system of representation and communication. Technical, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of cinema and the reading of film as a means for communicating American ideals, values and attitudes. This course is cross-listed with HUM 250. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Development of the American film industry
2. Film vocabulary
3. Cinematic art and technology
4. Hollywood film genres
5. Film analysis and critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the key events of American film history from the silent cinema to the present day. (1) (AH 1, 6)
2. Use the basic technical and critical vocabulary of motion pictures. (2) (AH 3)
3. Analyze the relationship between the technologies of cinema and film art. (3) (AH 2, 5)
4. Explain the role of genre in American film history as it relates to the expression of American ideals, values and idenity. (4) (AH 1,2)
5. Analyze and critique American films. (5) (AH 4, 5)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT: Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words.

3
       3.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
PSY234 Child Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PSY 234. Child Development (3). Children's development from conception through childhood. Includes prenatal, brain, physical, sensory, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development, as well as genetics and cultural influences. This course is cross-listed with ECE 234. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Genetics, prenatal, and birth
2. Physical development through childhood
3. Cognitive development through childhood
4. Language development through childhood
5. Emotional development through childhood
6. Social development through childhood
7. Cultural influences on child development

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Summarize research methods applied to various theoretical perspectives of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,2)
2. Describe major developmental themes (e.g. nature-nurture, stability and change, early-late experiences, and continuity - discontinuity) as applied to child development theories. (2-6) (BS 1)
3. Evaluate various theories of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,3,4)
4. Delineate genetic and prenatal influences on child development. (1) (BS 3)
5. Analyze the interplay of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. (2-6) (BS 4)
6. Identify the probable effects of parents, family, peers, teachers, and community on child development. (2-6) (BS 4)
7. Conduct research on topics related to child development. (1-7) (BS 2)
8. Discuss the cultural influences on child development. (7) (BS 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1,500 words of monitored writing.

3
OR ECE234 Child Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ECE 234. Child Development (3). Children's development from conception through childhood. Includes prenatal, brain, physical, sensory, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development, as well as genetics and cultural influences. This course is cross-listed with PSY 234. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Genetics, prenatal, and birth
2. Physical development through childhood
3. Cognitive development through childhood
4. Language development through childhood
5. Emotional development through childhood
6. Social development through childhood
7. Cultural influences on child development

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Summarize research methods applied to various theoretical perspectives of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,2)
2. Describe major developmental themes (e.g. nature-nurture, stability and change, early-late experiences, and continuity - discontinuity) as applied to child development theories. (2-6) (BS 1)
3. Evaluate various theories of child development. (2-6) (BS 1,3,4)
4. Delineate genetic and prenatal influences on child development. (1) (BS 3)
5. Analyze the interplay of physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. (2-6) (BS 4)
6. Identify the probable effects of parents, family, peers, teachers, and community on child development. (2-6) (BS 4)
7. Conduct research on topics related to child development. (1-7) (BS 2)
8. Discuss the cultural influences on child development. (7) (BS 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1,500 words of monitored writing.

3
       4.  Social Science (3 credits)
 
Show / hide all social science courses

Social Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Communication Requirement (3 credits)
COM100 Intro Human Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 100. Introduction to Human Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1100. Introduction to the essential elements of human communication and behavior, with emphasis on intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public communication, and oral communication skills important to personal and professional settings. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contemporary and historical theories of the dynamics and processes of human communication
2. Perception
3. Use of language
4. Nonverbal messages
5. Conflict management
6. Concepts and theories of listening
7. Interpersonal communication and relationship dynamics
8. Dynamic group communication
9. Intercultural communication
10. Gender communication
11. Basic public speaking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, and understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (6,11)
2. Generate organized and logical speaking that responds to the demands of a specific rhetorical situation. (1,11)
3. Use precision in writing, speaking, and thinking and express awareness of the power and variety of language. (3,6,11)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (4)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication in both interpersonal and group/team situations. (2,7,8)
7. Evaluate communication theories for a variety of cultural contexts. (9)
8. Formulate and deliver effective oral presentations. (11)
9. Design simple, effective messages for a mass communication context (i.e., advertising and public relations). (8,11)
10. Analyze the impact of new communication technologies on human communication. (1)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. 1,500 words of monitored writing and submission of a portfolio

3
OR COM131 Fund Speech Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 131. Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3). Study of the essential elements of oral communication, with major emphasis on public speaking. Includes use of multimedia technologies for presentations. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Communication Discipline
2. Basic Rhetoric
3. Speech Structure
4. Content Development
5. Speech Preparation
6. Speech Anxiety
7. Delivery Techniques and Styles
8. Listening
9. Multicultural Communication
10. Speech Analysis
11. Communication Ethics
12. Audience Analysis.
13. Public Speaking in Group Environments
14. Individual Research Project

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning.(3-8)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment (2,5,7)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes. (5,7,8,10,12)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (10,12)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments.(9,11,12,13,14)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1, 2, 9,10)
7. Analyze audience and topic choice for various speaking situations(5,10,12)
8. Write full-sentence and speaking outlines. (4,5)
9. Identify and manage the causes of speech anxiety. (6)
10. Analyze speeches for use of stylistic and rhetorical devices, and implement the use of such devices in speeches. (2,3,10)
11. Implement strategies for delivery of messages to a variety of audiences, using a variety of visual aids (including multimedia technologies). (7,12,13,14)

3
OR COM134 Interpersonal Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 134. Interpersonal Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1110. Build healthy personal and professional relationships. Includes listening, coping with criticism, resolving conflicts, managing emotions, nonverbal communication, and developing empathy for gender and cultural differences. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Perception of self and others
2. Self-awareness and self-acceptance
3. Irrational thinking and debilitative emotions
4. Responding to others: listening and feedback
5. Concrete versus abstract language
6. Communicating without words: nonverbal communication
7. Building positive relationships
8. Self-disclosure in relationships
9. Overcoming barriers and resolving conflicts
10. Assertiveness and aggression
11. Gender and cultural issues in a complex, diverse society

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (4, 9)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment. ( 1,3,4,7,8,10)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes.(5, 9, 10)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (2,5, 6,7)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1,11)
7. Differentiate between the use of concrete and abstract language. (5)
8. Identify skills for building positive relationships. (7,8)
9. Implement strategies for recognizing and managing the cause of conflict in relationships. (9,10)
10. Differentiate between stereotypes and legitimate differences in communication styles, based on gender and cultural background (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Written journal, minimum of 1,500 word entries.

3
OR COM271 Small Group Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 271. Small Group Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 2271. Examination of the principles and processes of group communication as a vehicle for solving problems, reaching decisions and making recommendations. Students will study and practice the theories, behaviors and processes of group communication. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Group communication theory
2. Group and group processes
3. Group concepts
4. Group climate
5. Decision making and problem solving theories and strategies
6. Leadership theories and strategies
7. Technology and teams

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply theories and principles of group communication (1,2,7)
2. Apply and identify group problem solving and decision making strategies (5)
3. Evaluate group processes and behavior (2,4)
4. Apply leadership and group participation skills (3,6)
5. Identify and apply available technologies for virtual meetings (7)

3
III.  Major and Elective Studies (24 credits)
ECE222 Intro Exceptional Learner

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ECE 222. Introduction to the Exceptional Learner (3). Introduction to educating children with special needs or abilities including students with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities and students who are gifted or talented. Emphasis on current educational practices and related educational theories, including identification, causes, and characteristics of exceptional learners. Overview of history, assessment, intervention, curriculum implications, and research issues in special education. Observation and participation hours in a special education setting required. This course is cross-listed with EDU 222. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical background and current legal considerations in the instruction of exceptional children.
2. Common psychological and behavioral characteristics of the various exceptionality categories.
3. Diagnosis and assessment of exceptional children.
4. Educational considerations of learning exceptionalities.
5. Family involvement in treatment and identification of social support system.Discuss society's historical identification and treatment of exceptional children and youth.
6. Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) and individualized Education Program (IEP)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Historical background and current legal considerations in the instruction of exceptional children. (1)
2. Research and discuss major laws and court cases regarding exceptional children. (1)
3. Describe common characteristics of exceptionality categories. (2)
4. Identify factors in diagnosing and assessing students with disabilities. (3)
5. Discuss qualities and techniques for working with exceptional students. (4)
6. Design and communicate a family systems approach that incorporates parents, social service agencies, and professionals. (5)
7. Discuss the components and processes of the IFSP and IEP. (6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Five hours of observation in a special education practicum.

3
OR EDU222 Intro Exceptional Learner

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
EDU 222. Introduction to the Exceptional Learner (3). Introduction to educating children with special needs or abilities including students with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities and students who are gifted or talented. Emphasis on current educational practices and related educational theories, including identification, causes, and characteristics of exceptional learners. Overview of history, assessment, intervention, curriculum implications, and research issues in special education. Observation and participation hours in a special education setting required. This course is cross-listed with ECE 222. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical background and current legal considerations in the instruction of exceptional children
2. Common psychological and behavioral characteristics of the various exceptionality categories
3. Diagnosis and assessment of exceptional children
4. Educational considerations of learning exceptionalities
5. Family involvement in treatment and identification of social support system.Discuss society's historical identification and treatment of exceptional children and youth
6. Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) and Individualized Education Program (IEP)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss society's historical identification and treatment of exceptional children and youth. (1)
2. Research and discuss major laws and court cases regarding exceptional children. (1)
3. Describe common characteristics of exceptionality categories. (2)
4. Identify factors in diagnosing and assessing of students with disabilities. (3)
5. Discuss qualities and techniques for working with exceptional students. (4)
6. Design and communicate a family systems approach that incorporates parents, social service agencies, and professionals. (5)
7. Discuss the components and processes of the IFSP and IEP. (6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Five hours of observation in a special education practicum.

3
.
ECE230 Language & Literacy Experience

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ECE 230. Language and Literacy Experiences (3). Language and literacy processes and the way in which literature enriches a child's development. Review of children's literature and methods of enhancing literacy experiences. This course is cross-listed with EDU 230. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Language and literacy processes
2. Bibliographies
3. Reviewing and evaluating children's literature
4. Artistic content
5. Lesson plans utilizing children's literature
6. Story-telling and reading aloud

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe language development leading to literacy. (1)
2. Define and use common literary genres to develop literacy skills. (1-3, 6)
3. Identify criteria for selecting quality children's literature. (2-4)
4. Plan lessons to promote language and literacy learning. (1,5,6).
5. Identify literature for use in biblio-therapeutic contexts (2,3)
6. Create a bibliography of literature for children. (2)

3
OR EDU230 Language & Literacy Experience

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
EDU 230. Language and Literacy Experiences (3). Language and literacy processes and the way in which literature enriches a child's development. Review of children's literature and methods of enhancing literacy experiences. This course is cross-listed with ECE 230. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Language and literacy processes
2. Biblographies
3. Reviewing and evaluating children's literature
4. Artistic content
5. Lesson plans utilizing children's literature
6. Storytelling and reading aloud

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe language development leading to literacy. (1)
2. Define and use the common literary genres to develop literacy skills. (1-3,6)
3. Identify criteria for selecting quality children's literature. (2-4)
4. Plan developmentally appropriate lessons to promote language and literacy learning (1,5,6)
5. Identify literature for use in biblio-therapeutic contexts. (2,3)
6. Create a bibliography of literature for children. (2)

3
.
ECE240 Family & Comm Partnerships

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ECE 240. Family and Community Partnerships (3). School and family relationships with a focus on communication, ethics, professionalism and problem-solving. Impact of the community, its resources and referral systems. Emphasis on families, diversity, multicultural issues and parent involvement. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Communication and listening skills
2. Diversity in parenting and family structures
3. Family and school relationships in multicultural settings
4. Teacher roles
5. Parent-teacher converences
6. Professionalism and ethics
7. Community resources

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply techniques of active listening and communicating. (1)
2. Define teacher and prent roles in communication. (1-6)
3. Identify familial differences and parenting styles. (2,3)
4. Describe issues of professionalism and ethics in the early childhood field. (4,6)
5. Identify resources and referral systems in the community. (7)
6. Conduct parent/teacher conferences. (5)

3
EDU200 Intro to Education

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
EDU 200. Introduction to Education (3). Overview of education profession and U.S. educational system; historical development and foundations of education and educational institutions. Includes theories of teaching, the student as learner, current issues and trends in education, the school and community, and roles and responsibilities of the teacher. Includes a field and observation practicum. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Personal abilities, characteristics, and motives in teaching
2. Learning theories and applications to teaching
3. Diversity in the classroom
4. Effective teaching methods and strategies
5. Current issues in education
6. Research strategies and resources in education
7. Technology and instruction
8. Philosophical foundations of American education
9. Ethical and legal issues facing teachers
10. Critical thinking, reflective writing, and oral presentation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate personal potential and options to select teaching as a career. (1)
2. Apply methods of teaching styles as they relate to student learning styles and design and present appropriate classroom activities intended to achieve specific learning outcomes. (2,4,10)
3. Define and propose methods for addressing diversity in the classroom. (3)
4. Analyze classroom observation journals and apply to own teaching. (4)
5. Research and discuss major issues and trends in education. (5)
6. Assess the function of technology in education and ways of integrating technology into the curriculum. (7)
7. Develop a personal philosophy of education and relate it to a future career in education. (2,6,8,10)
8. Explain the historical development of education. (8)
9. Define areas of legal and ethical concerns to teachers. (9)

3
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
EDU 210. Cultural Diversity in Education (3) (Spring). Prepares potential teachers to examine how race, ethnicity, and cultural differences influence students' experiences in school. Assists teachers in implementing a multicultural approach to teaching by fostering critical thinking and identifying effective teaching styles and practices for a diverse student population. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Critical thinking concepts
2. Historical and contemporary multicultural relationships in American society and in education
3. Origins of cultures encountered in the classroom
4. Languages and cultural resources encountered in the schools and community
5. Cultural and racial biases that impact teaching and the application of critical thinking skills when assessing these issues
6. Institutional changes needed in schools/society for equal educational opportunities for students
7. Internet as a source for research and learning about the latest pedagogy in multicultural education

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the elements of the critical thinking process. (1) (CT 1)
2. Identify and explain historically how changing demographics (race, ethnicity, and gender) influence public schools and inform perspectives. (2, 4-6; ERG 2)
3. Define and articulate the concept of multicultural education and its implementation in the public school classroom and create effective solutions to problems related to multicultural education. (1-6; ERG 1) (CT 1,4)
4. Describe the contributions of ethnic/cultural groups represented in the schools and community and communicate those contributions through writing, reading, speaking, viewing and/or listening activities. (1-3; ERG 2) (CT 2)
5. Articulate how gender, class, and religious differences cut across boundaries of race and ethnicity and apply critical thinking skills when assessing related issues while recognizing that closure is not always reached. (1, 3, 5; ERG 1, 4) (CT 3,4)
6. Apply critical thinking skills when assessing cultural influences on communication styles, attitudes, values, expectations and perceptions within the community and educational setting, and create effective solutions to such issues. (1, 4; ERG 4) (CT 3, 4)
7. Differentiate issues of culture, ethnicity/race, and/or gender and describe how the concepts of equity and equal educational opportunity have evolved into educational policy. (3, 6; ERG 1, 2, 5) (CT 1)
8. Design lesson plans using the latest research in multicultural education and apply best practices, including critical thinking, for fostering cultural diversity in the classroom. (1, 7; ERG 6) CT 1)
9. Construct pertinent questions based on current issues in multicultural education and articulate informed choices related to multicultural education based on refined critical thinking skills. (1) CT 1-4)

3
EDU239 SEI Provisional Endorsement

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
EDU 239. Structured English Immersion Provisional Endorsement (3). Prepares certified teachers and administrators who were trained in states other than Arizona or were certified after August 2006 to meet the academic needs of English Language Learner populations and qualifies them for the Provisional SEI Endorsement as required by the Arizona Department of Education. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. ELL Proficiency Standards correlated to the K-12 AZ Academic Standards adopted by the AZ Board of Education.
2. Assessment tools
3. SEI law, history, principles, terminology.
4. Role of culture in learning and comprehension
5. SEI theory, methods, and strategies in the core curriculum.
6. Implementation and Integration of SEI.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze the content and use of the Arizona English Language Learner Assessment (AZELLA) in guiding instruction. (1,2)
2. Identify and classify the characteristics of the five stages of language acquisition. (3)
3. Analyze program options for English Language Learners. (1)
4. Identify the legal, historical and educational reasons for SEI. (3)
5. Discuss the relevance of state mandated achievement tests for ELL's (2)
6. Identify methods of assessment. (2)
7. List language acquisition theoretical principals. (3)
8. Identify factors that effect second language acquisition. (3,4)
9. Use basic SEI terminology. (3)
10. Describe the difference between effective and sheltered instruction. (5)
11. Identify considerations for students with learning disabilities. (5)
12. Describe the role of culture in learning. (4)
13. Describe affective issues related to English Language Learners and the importance of using grouping strategies. (5)
14. Identify and use multiple strategies to improve student achievement. (5,6)
15. Examine the format and alignment of ELL proficiency standards to the AZ Language Arts Academic Standards. (1,6)
16. Use ELL Proficiency Standards to plan, deliver and evaluate instruction. (2,6)
17. Identify and use the integration of ELL Proficiencies Standards in all content areas. (6)

3
MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 156. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes problem solving, set theory, properties and operations with number systems. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Problem solving strategies
2. Set theory and set operations.
3. Properties and operations with whole numbers
4. Properties and operations using other bases
5. Properties and operations with integers
6. Properties and operations with rational numbers
7. Properties and operations with decimal numbers
8. Number theory of primes, composites, and factors
9. Percents, ratios and proportions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use Polya's Four Step Model when problem-solving. (1) (QL 2,4)
2. Use set notation and perform set operations using listed sets and Venn Diagrams. (2) (QL 1)
3. Solve whole number operations and explain the algorithms used. (3) (QL 1,4)
4. Solve problems in other number bases. (4) (QL 1)
5. Solve integer number operations and explain the algorithms used. (5) (QL 1,4)
6. Solve rational number operations and explain the algorithms used. (6) (QL 1,4)
7. Solve decimal number operations and explain the algorithms used. (7) (QL 1,4)
8. Categorize numbers as prime and composite and find GCD and LCM. (8) (QL 1)
9. Solve problems using percents, ratios and proportiions. (9) (QL 2,4)

3
MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 157. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes geometry, measurement, statistics, and probability. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Geometric shapes and definitions
2. Symmetry
3. Similarity
4. Measurement using the U.S. system and the metric system
5. Perimeter, area, surface area and volume of geometric figures
6. Euclidean construction
7. Topics in Statistics including graphs and measures of central tendency and variability
8. Probability
9. Counting techniques including combinations and permutation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize geometrical shapes and describe their properties. (1) (QL 1)
2. Observe symmetry in geometric shapes. (2) (QL 1)
3. Use similarity to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2)
4. Use measuring units including metric units. (4) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Find perimeter, area, surface area, and volumes of geometric objects. (5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Perform Euclidean constructions. (6) (QL 1)
7. Convert data from table format to graphical format. (7) (QL 3)
8. Analyze data statistically using basic measures of central tendency and measures of variability. (7) (QL 1-3)
9. Calculate the probability of the outcomes of simple experiments. (8) (QL 1-3)
10. Use counting techniques including permutations and combinations. (9) (QL 1,2)

3
1 - Select and complete two laboratory science courses from the approved list of General Education Courses in two of the following categories: a. Life: Biology, Environmental Science, Botany, Anatomy (4); b. Physical: Geography, Physics, Chemistry (4); c. Earth/Space: Astronomy, Geology (4)

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.