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Program Contacts

Prescott Advising Prescott Academic Advising (928) 776-2106
Verde Advising Verde Valley Academic Advising (928) 634-6510
Instructional Specialist Michelle Peters (928) 776-2035
Dean Craig Ralston (928) 776-2311

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Arts in Fine Arts

The Associate of Arts in Fine Arts degree requires completion of 64 credit hours. This degree is designed to enable a student to transfer to a baccalaureate-granting institution. Students following this degree program will complete university-parallel requirements in general education that will fulfill all lower division general education requirements at the Arizona universities. The AAFA degree will also allow students as declared fine arts (art and music) majors to fulfill their lower division major requirements at Yavapai College. This degree outline provides the list of fine arts core requirement courses.

Thirty-five hours of coursework are concentrated in general education. At Yavapai College the Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC-A) is embedded in the Associate of Arts in Fine Arts degree. Arizona General Education (AGEC) special requirements incorporate additional university requirements in Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR), Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) awareness, and Global/International and Historical (GIH) awareness areas. Upon completion of all 35 credit hours (including the special requirements) of the AGEC with a grade of “C” of higher, the student will receive recognition of completion on the transcript and guaranteed transferability of the AGEC upon admission to one of the state universities in Arizona.

The core curriculum consists of three parts: (A) Foundation Studies include critical literacy, precise writing, qualitative thinking, and the process of analysis and synthesis that underlie logical reasoning; (B) Core Studies focus on the conceptual frameworks through which a thinker, a culture, or an academic discipline may approach an issue; (C) Area Studies link foundation skills in thinking and communicating and the core emphasis on conceptual frameworks to the content orientation of academic disciplines.

Three credit hours of communications coursework are required for this degree. Twenty-six credit hours of coursework in this degree are in major and elective studies divided into Art and Music Concentrations. This aspect of the degree affords the student an opportunity to begin work on a major area of study.

Students preparing to transfer to an upper-division baccalaureate degree program should contact an advisor in the major field of study at the transfer institution in addition to meeting regularly with a faculty advisor and/or counselor at Yavapai College. Regular advisement is important to build an educational plan and ensure transferability of general education, elective, and major courses. Students intending to transfer to one of the Arizona public universities can obtain specific information on transferability of courses from the Course Equivalency Guide and curriculum transfer guides available from academic advisors. Transfer guides are also available from each university's web site.

Note:  

*AGEC Special Awareness Requirements Students must complete a course from each of the following areas:

  • Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR) 
  • ​Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) awareness
  • Global/International or Historical (GIH) awareness

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Associate of Arts in Fine Arts Degree program, the learner will be able to:

Art Concentration:

1.    Articulate the creative process and influence of project development.

2.    Use safe practices with appropriate equipment, tools and materials.

3.    Exercise and exhibit quality craftsmanship.

4.    Utilize, analyze and synthesize the principles and elements of design.

5.    Identify historical and contemporary examples of the Fine Arts and Crafts.

6.    Create a fine arts portfolio.

Music Concentration:

1.    Perform at a required level of artistry and technical proficiency on an instrument.

2.    Develop and perform a required level of music analytical competence.

3.    Exhibit a required level of aural recognition.

4.    Explain the historical and cultural development of music throughout the ages.

5.    Communicate informed personal reactions to recorded and live music.

 

 

General Educational Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education (35 credits)
  A.  Foundation Studies (9 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT142 College Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 142. College Mathematics (3). Survey of mathematical topics and applications. Includes statistics, probability, exponential functions, finance, dimensional analysis and other selected discrete math topics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Algebraic Models of Growth and Decay
2. Mathematics of Personal Finance
3. Counting and Probability
4. Descriptive Statistics and the Normal Distribution
5. Dimensional Analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create and apply linear, quadratic and exponential models. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Apply the mathematics of personal finance, including compound interest, annuities, and amortized loans. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Apply the basic rules of counting: fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply basic rules of probability including compound events, conditional probability, and expected value to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Calculate and interpret graphical and numerical summaries of data, including measures of central tendency and dispersion. (4) (QL 1-4)
6. Use the basic properties of the Normal curve to solve applied problems. (4) (QL 1-4)
7. Use dimensional analysis to make conversions with metric and U.S. measurement systems. (5) (QL 1-4)

3
OR MAT152 College Algebra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 152. College Algebra (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1151. Modeling of applications using linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Introduction to solving systems of equations using matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear Functions
2. Quadratic and other nonlinear functions
3. Exponential and logarithmic functions
4. Polynomial functions
5. Systems of equations and matrices
6. Technology in mathematics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use technology to recognize trends in data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL1-4)
2. Create suitable functions that model data using technology. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-3)
3. Analyze an application using a function developed from data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-4)
4. Add, subtract and multiply matrices in the context of an application. (5,6) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Solve a system of equations using matrices and technology. (5,6) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 156. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes problem solving, set theory, properties and operations with number systems. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Problem solving strategies
2. Set theory and set operations.
3. Properties and operations with whole numbers
4. Properties and operations using other bases
5. Properties and operations with integers
6. Properties and operations with rational numbers
7. Properties and operations with decimal numbers
8. Number theory of primes, composites, and factors
9. Percents, ratios and proportions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use Polya's Four Step Model when problem-solving. (1) (QL 2,4)
2. Use set notation and perform set operations using listed sets and Venn Diagrams. (2) (QL 1)
3. Solve whole number operations and explain the algorithms used. (3) (QL 1,4)
4. Solve problems in other number bases. (4) (QL 1)
5. Solve integer number operations and explain the algorithms used. (5) (QL 1,4)
6. Solve rational number operations and explain the algorithms used. (6) (QL 1,4)
7. Solve decimal number operations and explain the algorithms used. (7) (QL 1,4)
8. Categorize numbers as prime and composite and find GCD and LCM. (8) (QL 1)
9. Solve problems using percents, ratios and proportiions. (9) (QL 2,4)

3
OR MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 157. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes geometry, measurement, statistics, and probability. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Geometric shapes and definitions
2. Symmetry
3. Similarity
4. Measurement using the U.S. system and the metric system
5. Perimeter, area, surface area and volume of geometric figures
6. Euclidean construction
7. Topics in Statistics including graphs and measures of central tendency and variability
8. Probability
9. Counting techniques including combinations and permutation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize geometrical shapes and describe their properties. (1) (QL 1)
2. Observe symmetry in geometric shapes. (2) (QL 1)
3. Use similarity to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2)
4. Use measuring units including metric units. (4) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Find perimeter, area, surface area, and volumes of geometric objects. (5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Perform Euclidean constructions. (6) (QL 1)
7. Convert data from table format to graphical format. (7) (QL 3)
8. Analyze data statistically using basic measures of central tendency and measures of variability. (7) (QL 1-3)
9. Calculate the probability of the outcomes of simple experiments. (8) (QL 1-3)
10. Use counting techniques including permutations and combinations. (9) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT167 Elementary Statistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 167. Elementary Statistics (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1160. Statistical tools and techniques used in research and general applications. Description of sample data, probability and probability distributions, point and interval estimates of population parameters, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 142 or 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Descriptive statistics
2. Probability
3. Normal distribution
4. Research design
5. Sampling strategies
6. Confidence intervals
7. Hypotheses testing of one population
8. Hypothesis testing of two population
9. Tests of categorical data
10. Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Tables
11. Regression and correlation
12. Statistics technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use both numerical and graphical methods to describe data. (1) (QL 1,3)
2. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variability. (1) (QL 1-3)
3. Compute probabilities for both simple and compound events. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply the normal distribution to probability problems and estimation of population parameters. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Critique the research methods of others, and use research methodology. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
6. Produce representative random samples. (5) (QL 1,4)
7. Calculate and interpret confidence intervals as estimates of population parameters. (6) (QL 1-4)
8. Perform hypothesis tests about means and other parameters from large and small samples using one and multiple sample methods. (7,8) (QL 1-4)
9. Test hypothesis about categorical data. (9) (QL 1-4)
10. Recognize appropriate use of Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Table tests. (10) (QL 1-3)
11. Use regression and correlation to test hypothesis and create models for bivariate data. (11) (QL 1-4)
12. Use both hand-held calculators and desktop computers to perform statistical analysis. (12) (QL 1)

3
OR MAT172 Finite Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 172. Finite Mathematics (3). Various analytic methods employed in business, social and life sciences with an emphasis on applications. Topics include algebra review, linear programming, matrix operations, linear systems of equations, set theory, counting, probability and statistics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear functions and their graphs
2. Matrices
3. Linear systems of equations
4. Linear programming
5. Set theory
6. Counting techniques
7. Probability theory
8. Statistics
9. Finance problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform elementary matrix operations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion. (2) (QL 1-3)
2. Solve n-by-m linear systems of equations using elementary row operations. (1,3) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Solve linear programming problems by graphical and algebraic techniques. (1,4) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Perform the basic operations of union, intersection and complement on sets. (5) (QL 1)
5. Use Venn diagrams, combinations and permutations in applications involving counting. (6) (QL 1)
6. Evaluate probabilities of simple, compound, independent and dependent events. (7) (QL 1-4)
7. Compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a collection of statistical data. (8) (QL 1-4)
8. Apply the theory of normal and binomial probability distributions to statistics problems. (8) (QL 1-3)
9. Compute the present value of an annuity, interest on mortgages, and cash flow. (9) (QL 1,2,4)

3
OR MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

5
OR MAT212 Survey of Calculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 212. Survey of Calculus (3). Introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, life, and social sciences. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Limits and continuity
2. Derivatives
3. The laws of differentiation
4. Integration
5. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Evaluate limits. (1) (QL 1-4)
3. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,4)
4. Determine maxima and minima of functions by applying differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,2)
5. Use calculus to analyze and graph functions. (2,5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (4,5) (QL 1,4)

3
OR MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
  B.  Core Studies (6 credits)
       1.  Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose from Approved List
 
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Historical Perspective (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the historical perspective (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
HIS131 United States History I   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS132 United States History II   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS201 Western Civilization I   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS202 Western Civilization II   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS205 World History   IWR ERG GIH 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Critical Thinking (3 credits) 
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Show / hide all critical thinking (agec) courses

Critical Thinking (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217   
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  C.  Area Studies (20 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (8 credits)
Choose from Approved List - GLG100 must be taken with one other 2 credit GLG course
 
Show / hide all physical & biological science courses

Physical & Biological Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biological science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AGS103   
BIO100 Biology Concepts   4
BIO103   
BIO105 Environmental Biology   4
BIO107 Introduction to Biotechnology   4
BIO108 Concepts in Plant Biology   4
BIO109 Natural History Southwest   4
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health   4
BIO160 Intro Human Anat & Physiology   4
BIO181 General Biology I   4
BIO182 General Biology II   4
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I   4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II   4
BIO205 Microbiology   4
CHM121   
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry   4
CHM138 Chemistry for Allied Health   5
CHM151 General Chemistry I   5
CHM152 General Chemistry II   5
CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I   4
CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab   1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II   4
CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab   1
ENV105 Environmental Biology   4
ENV110 Environmental Geology   4
ENV121   
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography   4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology   4
GLG100 Concepts in Basic Geology   2
GLG101 Intro to Geology I   4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II   4
GLG110 Environmental Geology   4
GLG116 Geology Verde Valley   2
GLG117 Implications Plate Tectonics   2
GLG118 Evolution of Basin and Range   2
GLG119 Geology of Grand Canyon   2
GLG120 Geology of Northern Arizona   2
GLG121 Volcanoes/Earthquakes N AZ   2
GLG122 Geology of Death Valley   2
GLG123 Geology of Bryce and Zion   2
GLG124 Geology of the Prescott Region   2
PHY100 Intro to Astronomy   4
PHY111 General Physics I   4
PHY112 General Physics II   4
PHY140 The Physical World   4
PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I   5
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II   5
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Arts and Humanities (6 credits) - Choose Option a or b:
          a.  Art Concentration
ART200 Art History I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 200. Art History I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1101. Western art from the Paleolithic Period to the Fourteenth Century. Two and three dimensional art and architecture evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Prehistoric art
2. Art of ancient civilizations
3. Art of classical antiquity
4. Early Christian, Medieval and Byzantine art
5. Romanesque art
6. Gothic art
7. Analytical writing and the oral critique
8. Application of principles and elements of design
9. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
10. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
11. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-11) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-11) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-8) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-9, 13,14) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-8,10) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western art. (1-7,11) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (1-11) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (IL 1-6) (LL 1-9)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning, and analytical discourse through assigned writing assignments, essay examinations, journals and/or research papers.

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ART201 Art History II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 201. Art History II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1102. Western art from the Fourteenth to the Twentieth Century. Two and three dimensional art and architecture are evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Fourteenth Century developments throughout Western Europe
2. Fifteenth Century developments throughout Western Europe art of classical antiquity
3. High Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy and Northern Europe
4. The Baroque and Rococo throughout Western Europe
5. Eighteenth Century developments in Europe and the Americas
6. Nineteenth Century European art and American landscape painting
7. The rise of modern art
8. Analytical writing and the oral critique
9. Application of principles and elements of design
10. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
11. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
12. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-7) (AH 1-4,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-7) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-7, 11,12) (AH 1,4) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1-4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western Art. (1-8,11,12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 1,2,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

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          a.  Music Concentration
MUS240 Music Appreciation

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 240. Music Appreciation (3). Explores the common elements of rhythm, melody, harmony, and form as they connect with the heritage of human understanding. Examines issues of universal human concern that are reflected in all styles of music from folk to classical. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony, timbre, form
2. Styles of music: folk, popular, jazz, and classical art music
3. Influences within major historic periods (i.e. medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary)
4. Representative composers and their compositions from the major periods and styles
5. Cultural issues expressed through the production of music in Western societies

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply a designated vocabulary of terms to describe common elements of music. (1) (AH 3)
2. Use listening skills essential for perception of music by comparing and differentiating numerous musical examples taken from standard music literature. (2-4)
3. Describe the stylistic differences between music of the major historical musical periods of Western culture. (2,3) (AH 1)
4. Identify music of the folk and popular traditions, and compare these styles with classical art music. (2)
5. Identify and classify major composers of both classical literature and music of the popular traditions. (3,4) (AH 5)
6. Discuss and analyze the connection between musical aesthetic principles and the cultural and historical context from which musical compositions derive. (3,5) (AH 2)
7. Examine and discuss universal (moral, spiritual, intellectual, and aesthetic) issues expressed through the production of music in Western societies. (3,5)
8. Identify, interpret, evaluate and synthesize stylistic characteristics as they apply to contrasting world views through musical compositions. (2,4,5) (AH 4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of evaluated writing.

3
MUS245 Music of World Cultures

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 245. Music of World Cultures (3). Cultural and historical ethnic music contributions throughout the world. Social, cultural and spiritual factors affecting music. Emphasis on listening skills, style characteristics, properties of sound and elements of music on various instruments. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Development of aural (listening skills)
2. Properties of sound and elements of music
3. Classification and methods of producing sound on various instruments
4. Cultural contributions to music from around the world
5. Style characteristics of different ethnic cultures
6. Social, cultural and spiritual value of music in world

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize and classify cultural and ethnic music examples. (1) (AH 5)
2. Describe properties of sound. (2) (AH 3)
3. Identify, compare and contrast use of various instruments to achieve characteristic sounds. (3) (AH 5)
4. Research and discuss the value of music in world cultures. (4) (AH 4)
5. Identify basic patterns of style for specific cultures or historical time periods. (5) (AH 1)
6. Analyze social, cultural, and spiritual environmental factors influencing the development of music in specific cultures. (6) (AH 2)


REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 2500 words of monitored writing.

3
       3.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
Choose from Approved LIst
 
Show / hide all behavioral science (agec) courses

Behavioral Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152 Personal Health & Wellness   3
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       4.  Social Science (3 credits)
Choose from Approved LIst
 
Show / hide all social science (agec) courses

Social Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Communications Requirement (3 credits)
COM100 Intro Human Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 100. Introduction to Human Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1100. Introduction to the essential elements of human communication and behavior, with emphasis on intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public communication, and oral communication skills important to personal and professional settings. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contemporary and historical theories of the dynamics and processes of human communication
2. Perception
3. Use of language
4. Nonverbal messages
5. Conflict management
6. Concepts and theories of listening
7. Interpersonal communication and relationship dynamics
8. Dynamic group communication
9. Intercultural communication
10. Gender communication
11. Basic public speaking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, and understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (6,11)
2. Generate organized and logical speaking that responds to the demands of a specific rhetorical situation. (1,11)
3. Use precision in writing, speaking, and thinking and express awareness of the power and variety of language. (3,6,11)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (4)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication in both interpersonal and group/team situations. (2,7,8)
7. Evaluate communication theories for a variety of cultural contexts. (9)
8. Formulate and deliver effective oral presentations. (11)
9. Design simple, effective messages for a mass communication context (i.e., advertising and public relations). (8,11)
10. Analyze the impact of new communication technologies on human communication. (1)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. 1,500 words of monitored writing and submission of a portfolio

3
OR COM131 Fund Speech Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 131. Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3). Study of the essential elements of oral communication, with major emphasis on public speaking. Includes use of multimedia technologies for presentations. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Communication Discipline
2. Basic Rhetoric
3. Speech Structure
4. Content Development
5. Speech Preparation
6. Speech Anxiety
7. Delivery Techniques and Styles
8. Listening
9. Multicultural Communication
10. Speech Analysis
11. Communication Ethics
12. Audience Analysis.
13. Public Speaking in Group Environments
14. Individual Research Project

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning.(3-8)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment (2,5,7)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes. (5,7,8,10,12)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (10,12)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments.(9,11,12,13,14)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1, 2, 9,10)
7. Analyze audience and topic choice for various speaking situations(5,10,12)
8. Write full-sentence and speaking outlines. (4,5)
9. Identify and manage the causes of speech anxiety. (6)
10. Analyze speeches for use of stylistic and rhetorical devices, and implement the use of such devices in speeches. (2,3,10)
11. Implement strategies for delivery of messages to a variety of audiences, using a variety of visual aids (including multimedia technologies). (7,12,13,14)

3
OR COM134 Interpersonal Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 134. Interpersonal Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1110. Build healthy personal and professional relationships. Includes listening, coping with criticism, resolving conflicts, managing emotions, nonverbal communication, and developing empathy for gender and cultural differences. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Perception of self and others
2. Self-awareness and self-acceptance
3. Irrational thinking and debilitative emotions
4. Responding to others: listening and feedback
5. Concrete versus abstract language
6. Communicating without words: nonverbal communication
7. Building positive relationships
8. Self-disclosure in relationships
9. Overcoming barriers and resolving conflicts
10. Assertiveness and aggression
11. Gender and cultural issues in a complex, diverse society

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (4, 9)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment. ( 1,3,4,7,8,10)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes.(5, 9, 10)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (2,5, 6,7)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1,11)
7. Differentiate between the use of concrete and abstract language. (5)
8. Identify skills for building positive relationships. (7,8)
9. Implement strategies for recognizing and managing the cause of conflict in relationships. (9,10)
10. Differentiate between stereotypes and legitimate differences in communication styles, based on gender and cultural background (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Written journal, minimum of 1,500 word entries.

3
OR COM271 Small Group Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 271. Small Group Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 2271. Examination of the principles and processes of group communication as a vehicle for solving problems, reaching decisions and making recommendations. Students will study and practice the theories, behaviors and processes of group communication. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Group communication theory
2. Group and group processes
3. Group concepts
4. Group climate
5. Decision making and problem solving theories and strategies
6. Leadership theories and strategies
7. Technology and teams

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply theories and principles of group communication (1,2,7)
2. Apply and identify group problem solving and decision making strategies (5)
3. Evaluate group processes and behavior (2,4)
4. Apply leadership and group participation skills (3,6)
5. Identify and apply available technologies for virtual meetings (7)

3
III.  Major and Elective Studies (26 credits) - Choose Art or Music Concentration
  A.  Art Concentration 
       1.  Art Core Requirements (17 credits)
ART110 Drawing I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 110. Drawing I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1111. Perspective and visual perception studied as related to developing artistic visual growth in perceiving our environment. Emphasis on analysis of objects and their compositional placement within pictorial construction. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Drawing skills
a. Perspective
b. Foreshortening
c. Plastic space/modeling
d. Figure-ground
e. Chiaroscuro
2. Visual literacy and aesthetic
a. Visual memory
b. Analysis and study of forms
c. Visual vocabulary
3. Formal elements and principles of design
4. Historical and contemporary art examples
5. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply various perspective techniques.
2. Identify and use foreshortening..
3. Produce plastic space and modeling.
4. Use chiaroscuro technique.
5. Identify, memorize and transfer visual information to the page.
6. Analyze forms.
7. Develop a visual vocabulary
8. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
9. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
10. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART112 Two-Dimensional Design

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 112. Two-Dimensional Design (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1112 . Introduction to visual language utilized in all areas of art. Basic compositional principles and elements of two-dimensional design practiced through assigned projects. Various media explored. Application of design principles. Two lecture. Four lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Creative process
2. Application of design principles
a. Unity and variety
b. Rhythm
c. Balance
d. Emphasis and focal point
e. Proportion and scale
3. Application of design elements
a. Shape and volume
b.Space
c. Line
d. Texture
e. Light
f. Color
g. Time
h. Value
4. Two-dimensional art media tools
5. Formal elements and principles of design
6. Historical and contemporary art examples
7. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define and employ the steps of the creative process. (1)
2. Use design principles to develop two-dimensional works of art. (2)
a. Unity and variety
b. Rhythm
c. Balance
d. Emphasis and focal point
e. Proportion and scale
3. Use design elements to develop two-dimensional works of art. (3)
a. Shape and volume
b. Space
c. Line
d. Texture
e. Color
f. Value
4. Use art media and tools to create two-dimensional works of art. (4)
5. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (5)
6. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of teh fine rts or crafts. (6)
7. Use media specifric terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (7)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART113 Three-Dimensional Design

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 113. Three-Dimensional Design (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoART 1115.Study of design principles with emphasis on three-dimensional aesthetics. Planning of sculptural, utilitarian, and environmental objects. Application of design principles. Two lecture. Four lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Basic design principles
a. Repetition
b. Variety
c. Rhythm
d. Balance
e. Emphasis and economy
f. Proportion
2. Basic design elements
a. Form
b. Space
c. Line
d. Texture
e. Light
f. Color
g. Time
3. Construction Methods
a. Found objects and assemblage
b. Addition and manipulation
c. Subtraction
d. Casting
4. Formal elements and principles of design
5. Historical and contemporary art examples
6. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify, analyze and synthesize design principles in three-dimensional art work. (1,2,4)
2. Assemble found objects to create three-dimensional art work. (3)
3. Use additive and manipulative art techniques to create three-dimensional art work. (3)
4. Use subtractive art techniques to create three-dimensional art work. (3)
5. Use casting techniques to create three-dimensional art work. (3)
6. Use art terminology to critique and evaluate art work. (1,2)
7. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (4)
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (5)
9. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART114 Color

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 114. Color (3). Principles of color theory related to the visual arts. Includes variety of media. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Color properties
2. Color schemes
3. Color interaction
4. Color composition
5. Color perception
6. Formal elements and principles of design
7. Historical and contemporary art examples
8. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define and use additive and subtractive color. (1)
2. Create and explain a color wheel. (1)
3. Define and use color interactions. (1,2)
4. Apply hue, value and chroma in context. (1,2)
5. Describe and use harmonic and disharmonic color schemes in context. (1-4)
6. Describe and compose color to show spatial illusion, change visual weight and balance and emphasize compositional details. (1-4)
7. Describe and use a variety of emotional and psychological expressions of color. (1-5)
8. Use various media and rendering techniques to create visual examples based on color principles and effects. (1-7)
9. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (6)
10. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (7)
11. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (8)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART137 Adobe Photoshop I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 137. Adobe Photoshop I (3). Digital image fundamentals. Technical and creative use of Adobe® Photoshop® image manipulation software. Use of peripheral commercial hardware and software for image capture. Application of design principles. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Digital image fundamentals
2. Adobe® Photoshop® software program
3. Digital image capture
4. Digital image import
5. Digital image export
6. Digital image manipulation
7. Digital image composition
8. Digital image output processes
9. Formal elements and principles of design
10. Historical and contemorary art examples
11. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Articulate compositional elements of the digital image.
2. Use the functions of the Adobe Photoshop image manipulation program.
3. Convert images to a digital format using scanning hardware and software.
4. Import elements into an Adobe Photoshop document.
5. Export Adobe Photoshop images to other software programs.
6. Manipulate and enhance digital images.
7. Plan, design and execute an original digital image project.
8. Output digital images to a printer or electronic file.
9. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
10. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
11. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART232 Portfolio Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 232. Portfolio Development (2) (Spring). Develop traditional and electronic graphic design and fine arts portfolios. Create resume and other career search materials. Develop advanced design and technical skills. Exhibition skills. Apply design principles. Completed body of art work needed for class. One lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Self promotion
2. Business skills
3. Portfolio design skills
4. Formal elements and principles of design
5. Historical or contemporary art examples
6. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Assemble, prepare and maintain a traditional and/or electronic professional design or fine art portfolio. (1-5)
2. Write comprehensive resumes, cover letters, and artist statements. (1-3)
3. Research local and regional job, exhibition, and/or grant opportunities. (1,2)
4. Identify basic copy write laws as they apply to the designer or artist. (1,2)
5. Document art work using appropriate media. (1,3-5)
6. Interview using the portfolio. (1-5)
7. Use, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (4)
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (5)
9. Present traditional and/or electronic portfolio for review. (1-5)
10. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

2
       2.  Art Electives: Select 9 credit hours
ART111 Drawing II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 111. Drawing II (3). Development of technical and perceptual skills. Emphasis on composition as developed by shape, form, color and the special dynamics of plastic space. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 110. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Drawing techniques
2. Color theory
3. Exercises in color schemes
4. Compositional and design experimentation
5. Portrait drawing techniques
6. Landscape drawing techniques
7. Formal elements and principles of design
8. Historical and contemporary art examples
9. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply color rendering techniques using drawing media.
2. Identify specific color contrasts.
3. Utilize color schemes.
4. Apply creative compositional techniques.
5. Apply portrait rendering skills.
6. Apply landscape rendering skills.
7. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements of deign.
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
9. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART120 Ceramics I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 120. Ceramics I (3). Introduction to ceramics hand building techniques. Includes primary use of glazes, glaze applications, kiln firing processes and kiln atmosphere. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction and Identification of studio and personal tools
2. Definition of clay types
3. Preparation of clay
4. Hand forming techniques
a. Pinching
b. Coiling
c. Slab work
d. Slump and Hump Mold use
5. Use of the potter's wheel
a. Basic beginning procedures
b. Cylinder
6. Surface decoration techniques
a. Incising
b. Mark making
c. Stamping
d. Carving
7. Glaze application techniques
a. Wax resist
b. Dipping
c. Pouring
d. Brushwork
e. Overlaps
f. Metal oxide painting and staining
8. Basic kiln firing procedures
9. Kiln atmospheres
a. Reduction
b. Oxidation
10. Kiln types
a. Fuel kilns
b. Electric kilns
11. Ceramic terminology
12. Formal elements and principles of design
13. Historical and contemporary art examples
14. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and use ceramic studio and clay tools.
2. Define several clay types.
3. Prepare clay for use in hand building or wheel work.
4. Hand form clay using several techniques.
5. Form clay on the potter's wheel.
6. Use various techniques to affect the clay's surface.
7. Apply glaze using several techniques.
8. Describe the process of a kiln firing.
9. Identify different kiln firing atmospheres.
10. Name several kiln types.
11. Use and define basic ceramic vocabulary words.
12. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
13. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
14. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.


REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART121 Ceramics II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 121. Ceramics II (3). Concentration on use of the potter's wheel and other clay-building methods, further development of glazing and firing. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 120. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Use of the potters wheel
a. Cylinder
b. Bowl
c. Trimming
d. Lid
2. Hand forming techniques
a. Pinch
b. Coil
c. Slab work
d. Mold use
e. Handles
3. Surface decoration techniques
a. Stamping
b. Incising
c. Carving
d. Engobe
e. Sgraffito
f. Mishima
g. Sprigging
4. Glazing techniques
a. Wax resist
b. Dipping
c. Pouring
d. Brushwork
e. Overlaps
f. Metal oxide painting and staining
5. Basic glaze components
6. Basic kiln components
7. Kiln firing procedures and components
8. Formal elements and principles of design
9. Historical and contemporary art examples
10. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Form clay on the potter's wheel.
2. Hand form clay using several techniques.
3. Use various techniques to affect the clay?s surface.
4. Apply glaze using several techniques.
5. Identify basic glaze components.
6. Identify basic kiln components.
7. Define and describe the components needed for the kiln firing process.
8. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
9. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts
10. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART140 Jewelry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 140. Jewelry I (3). Introduction to jewelry fabrication techniques for non-ferrous metals and associated materials. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Equipment use and safety
2. Saw, pierce, and file
3. Forging, bend, dome, sink, and draw out metal shapes
4. Texture surfaces
5. Cold connections and soldering
6. Bezel settings
7. Cleaning, buffing and finishing
8. Critique
9. Formal elements and principles of design
10. Historical and contemporary art examples

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Utilize tools and equipment safely. (1)
2. Manipulate metal by sawing, piercing, and filing. (2)
3. Create metal forms using forging hammers and stakes. (3)
4. Enhance surfaces with textures. (4)
5. Assemble components using cold connections and soldering. (5)
6. Use a bezel setting to add cabochons or other elements. (6)
7. Use cleaning, buffing and finishing techniques. (7)
8. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (8)
9. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (9)
10. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (10)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART141 Jewelry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 141. Jewelry II (3). Advanced jewelry techniques, surface embellishment, casting, fabrication, forging, and joining non-ferrous metals. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 140. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Equipment use and safety
2. Model wax, invest and cast
3. Lidded container
4. Unit construction
5. Mold making
6. Surface embellishments
7. Formal elements and principles of design
8. Historical and contemporary art examples
9. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Utilize tools and equipment safely. (1)
2. Model a jewelry design in wax, invest and cast it. (2)
3. Construct a lidded container. (3)
4. Assemble unit construction of linked or repeated elements. (4)
5. Create molds for lost wax casting. (5)
6. Use surface embellishments. (6)
7. Identify, analyze and utilize formal elements and principles of design. (7)
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (8)
9. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (9)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART144 Furniture and Woodworking I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 144. Furniture and Woodworking I (3). Introduction to furniture design, joinery, machining, hand skills, assembly and finishing techniques. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Equipment use and safety
2. Furniture and/or woodworking projects
3. Two-point perspectives
4. Plans, bills-of-materials, figure board feet and plan cutting list
5. Characteristics of woods
6. Layout and measuring
7. Layout and cutting of basic joints, butt, rabbet, dado, miter, biscuit, mortise and tendon, and/or dowel
8. Assembly of furniture and woodworking assignments
9. Wood carving
10. Wood finishes
11. Formal elements and principles of design
12. Historical and contemporary art examples
13. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use tools and equipment safely.
2. Document design concepts to be used for furniture or woodworking projects.
3. Use two-point perspective to draw furniture or woodworking designs.
4. Create drawn plans, write bills-of-materials, calculate board feet and plan cutting list.
5. Incorporate the characteristics of woods into assignments' applications.
6. Apply layout and measurements on wood.
7. Identify, analyze and synthesize design principles.
8. Assemble furniture and woodworking assignments.
9. Use wood carving techniques for sculpture or apply to furniture.
10. Select and apply appropriate wood finish techniques.
11. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
12. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
13. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART145 Furniture and Woodworking II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 145. Furniture and Woodworking II (3). Advanced furniture design, joinery, jig building, and woodworking techniques. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 144. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Advanced equipment use and safety
2. Advanced furniture design and/or a woodworking project
3. Jig building
4. Frame making and mitering
5. Advanced joinery
6. Formal elements and principles of design
7. Historical and contemporary arat examples
8. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use advanced tools and equipment safely.
2. Document advanced design concepts to be used for furniture or woodworking projects.
3. Employ jigs during machining and/or assembly of assignments.
4. Use frame making and mitering.
5. Use advanced joinery.
6. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
7. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
8. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART150 Photography I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 150. Photography I (3). Fundamentals of photography. Creative camera operation. Identifying, measuring and controlling light values. Basic darkroom techniques and controls including film processing, contact printing and enlarging. Exhibition quality photography. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Basic vocabulary
2. Manual, fully adjustable 35mm camera and lens options
3. Aperture and shutter speed
4. Creative depth of field options
5. Shutter speed control
6. Light measurement and light meter reading
7. Light values and properties
8. Properties of black and white and color film
9. Film processing techniques
10. Darkroom enlarging and processing techniques
11. Image contrast and density control
12. Split filtration of contrast enlarging filters
13. Image cropping techniques
14. Print presentation and preservation techniques
15. Model release and copyright issues
16. Record keeping and organization
17. Formal elements and principles of design
18. Historical and contemporary art examples
19. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze photographic images and express an informed opinion about technical and aesthetic characteristics using the basic vocabulary of the photographic idiom. (1, 19)
2. Use a manual, fully adjustable 35mm camera. (2)
3. Choose appropriate aperture and shutter speed exposure combinations. (3)
4. Vary the depth of field using aperture settings for visual impact. (4)
5. Control motion using shutter speed setting for visual impact. (5)
6. Identify and measure properties of light and explain their effects on film and visual impact. (6)
7. Compose light values. (7)
8. Explain the properties of black and white and color film. (8)
9. Expose and process black and white film. (9)
10. Operate an enlarger to expand negatives into prints and process silver emulsion photographic printing paper. (10)
11. Manipulate contrast and density in a photographic print. (11)
12. Use split filtration to achieve a more complete tonal range in a photographic print. (12)
13. Compose a photographic print using cropping techniques. (13)
14. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (17)
15. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (18)
16. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (19)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

2. Portfolio review.

3
ART154 Digital Photo I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 154. Beginning Digital Photography (3). Creative digital camera operation. Identifying, measuring and controlling light values. Digital darkroom techniques, workflow applications and output processes. Application of design principles. Requires a Digital single lens reflex (SLR) camera with manually adjustable aperture, shutter speed, and focus. Prerequisite: ART 137 (may be taken concurrently). One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Photographic vocabulary
2. SLR Digital camera operation
3. Aperture and shutter speed
4. Lens focal length
5. Depth of field
6. Motion
7. Light measurement
8. Properties of light, direction, diffusion, temperature
9. Properties of digital sensors
10. Resolution and its relationship to image capture and output
11. Image capture formats
12. Image editing formats
13. Optional digital capture methods
14. File management workflow
15. Camera Raw editing workflow
16. Photoshop editing workflow
17. Image print output
18. Image web output
19. Model release and copyright issues
20. Recordkeeping and organization
21. Formal elements and principles of design
22. Historical and contemporary art examples
23. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Analyze photographic images and describe the technical and aesthetic characteristics. (1)
2. Use a manual, fully adjustable SLR digital camera. (2)
3. Ascertain correct aperture and shutter speed exposure combinations. (3)
4. Identify the effect of various focal length lenses on the photographic image. (4)
5. Vary the depth of field using aperture settings for visual effect. (5)
6. Control motion using shutter speed settings for visual impact. (6)
7. Identify and measure properties of light and explain their effects on exposure and visual impact. (7)
8. Compose light values as significantly as subjects. (8)
9. Explain the differences between various digital sensors and their effects on image capture. (9)
10. Illustrate the proper determination of image resolution for digital input and output. (10)
11. Identify image capture formats and explain their uses. (11)
12. Identify image editing formats and explain their uses. (12)
13. Use optional digital capture methods to acquire digital images. (13)
14. Establish a file management workflow to facilitate image archiving. (14)
15. Employ Camera Raw editing workflow techniques to manipulate and enhance digital images. (15)
16. Employ Photoshop editing workflow techniques to manipulate and enhance digital images. (16)
17. Optimize digital images for print output. (17)
18. Optimize digital images for web output. (18)
19. Document model releases and copyright protections. (19)
20. Document industry standards i record keeping and organization. (20)
21. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (21)
22. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (22)
23. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (23)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART157 Digital Photography II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 157. Digital Photography II (3). Advanced creative digital camera operation and exposure control. Advanced digital darkroom techniques, workflow applications and output processes. Application of design principles. Requires a Digital single lens reflex (SLR) camera with manually adjustable aperture, shutter speed and focus. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 154 and ART 237 (ART 237 may be taken concurrently). One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Advanced metering
2. Exposure compensation
3. Studio lighting
4. Electronic flash
5. Advanced file management workflow
6. Advanced Camera Raw editing workflow
7. Advanced Photoshop editing workflow
8. Advanced image print output
9. Advanced image web output
10. Creative use of digital cameras
11. Digital exploration of different photographic genre
12. Pre-visualization and post-visualization techniques
13. Digital photography in the marketplace
14. Photographic vision
15. Recordkeeping and organization
16. Formal elements and principles of design
17. Historical and contemporary art examples
18. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Compute correct exposure combinations using a handheld exposure meter. (1)
2. Articulate exposure compensation concepts. (2)
3. Apply basic studio lighting concepts. (3)
4. Define the proper use of electronic flash units. (4)
5. Establish a file management workflow to facilitate image archiving. (5)
6. Employ advanced Camera Raw editing workflow techniques to manipulate and enhance digital images. (6)
7. Employ advanced Photoshop editing workflow techniques to manipulate and enhance digital images. (7)
8. Optimize digital images for print output. (8)
9. Optimize digital images for web output. (9)
10. Explain and use the digital camera for creative expression. (10)
11. Record examples of different photographic genre through digital exploration and experimentation. (11)
12. Synthesize pre-visualization and post-visualization concepts to create a unique visual statement. (12)
13. Identify the use of digital photography in the marketplace. (13)
14. Define photographic vision and its use in creating unique aesthetic statements. (14)
15. Document industry standards in record keeping and organization. (15)
16. Identify, analyze, and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (16)
17. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (17)
18. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (18)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART160 Printmaking I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 160. Printmaking I (3). Introduction to printmaking techniques including monoprint, collograph, relief and elementary intaglio printing. Exploration of different methods of inking, registration, hand and press techniques. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Monoprint techniques
2. Relief printing and safe use of cutting tools
a. Foam board
b. Linoleum block/stamp
c. Wood block
3. Collograph techniques with different materials
4. Multiple/combination printmaking
a. Techniques of registration
b. Color/image overlay
c. Use of multiple plates/blocks
5. Inking processes
6. Edition of prints
7. Formal elements and principles of design
8. Historical and contemporary art examples
9. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply monoprint techniques using various inking processes.
2. Utilize relief processes and possibilities.
3. Utilize collograph techniques employing various materials.
4. Apply registration techniques.
5. Utilize overlay and other multiple printing techniques.
6. Apply inking processes using both water-base and oil-base printing materials
7. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
9. Use Media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART162 Monoprint I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 162. Monoprint I (3). Introduction to principles of water-base and oil-base techniques for this single print process. Techniques of registration and color overlays. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Plate preparation
2. Image Reversal
3. Processes of image transfer and overlay
a. Hand printing
b. Press
c. Registration
4. Water soluble and oil-base inks
5. Inking techniques
a. Additive/subtractive
b. Stencils
c. Viscosity
d. Rework of etching and relief plates
6. Equipment safety and studio maintenance
7. Formal elements and principles of design
8. Historical and contemporary art examples
9. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Prepare different types of plates for printing.
2. Anticipate and work with image reversal.
3. Utilize collograph techniques employing various materials.
4. Print using manual processes.
5. Use an etching press.
6. Utilize overlay and other multiple printing technique
7. Apply inking processes using both water-base and oil-base printing materials.
8. Employ inking techniques, including additive/subtractive, stencils, viscosity and reworking plates.
9. Exercise equipment safety and proper studio maintenance.
10. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
11. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
12. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART180 Sculpture I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 180. Sculpture I (3). Introductory exploration of sculpture through fabrication, casting and carving. Use the human form and abstraction for creative problem solving. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Tools and materials safety
2. Clay and plaster
3. Additive processes
4. Subtractive processes
5. Relief and sculpture in the round
6. Representation and abstraction
7. Finishing techniques, surfaces using color and texture
8. Armatures
9. Mold Making (waste mold or piece mold)
10. Sketchbook
11. Formal elements and principles of design
12. Historical and contemporary art examples
13. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use tools and materials safely. (1)
2. Use clay and plaster. (2)
3. Employ additive processes. (3)
4. Employ subtractive processes. (4)
5. Create relief and sculpture in the round. (5)
6. Create representational and abstract sculptures. (6)
7. Use finish techniques, investigate surfaces using color and texture. (7)
8. Construct and employ armature devices. (8)
9. Apply mold making (waste mold or piece mold) for sculpture reproduction. (9)
10. Compile ideas and images for sculptures in a sketchbook. (10)
11. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (11)
12. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (12)
13. Use media specific terminology tocritique and evaluate works of art. (13)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART181 Sculpture II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 181. Sculpture II (3). Advanced sculpture processes: modeling, mixed media, casting, and stone carving. Develop personal imagery and aesthetics through sculptural form. Prerequisite: ART 180. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Tools and materials safety
2. Modeling and fabrication
3. Figure proportions
4. Mixed media
5. Silicone mold with plaster mother mold
6. Stone sculpture
7. Texture and pattern
8. Finish techniques: gild, patina and/or paint
9. Personal aesthetic
10. Presentation and documentation of completed work
11. Sketchbook
12. Formal elements and principles of design
13. Historical and contemporary art examples
14. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use tools and materials safely.
2. Use modeling and fabrication techniques.
3. Employ figure proportions.
4. Investigate mixed media.
5. Apply silicone mold with plaster mother mold for reproducing sculpture.
6. Produce a stone carving.
7. Apply texture and pattern.
8. Use finish techniques: gild, patina and/or paint.
9. Convey a personal aesthetic.
10. Prepare presentation and documentation of completed work.
11. Enhance and compile images for sculpture in a sketchbook.
12. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
13. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
14. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART182 Sculpture: Welded Metal I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 182. Sculpture: Welded Metal I (3). Exploration of sculpture using Oxyacetylene torches and GMAW (wire) arc welding processes. Emphasis on welding, cutting, and shaping metal to explore sculptural forms. No prior welding experience is necessary. Application of design principles. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Use of tools and materials
2. Cutting and piercing metal
3. Joining metal components of a sculpture using butt, lap and tee joints
4. Assemblage construction methods and cold connections
5. Mechanical finishes, chemical and heat patinas
6. Relief and sculpture in the round constructed from metal
7. Sketchbook
8. Formal elements and principles of design
9. Historical and contemporary art examples
10. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use tools and equipment safely. (1)
2. Use various processes to cut and pierce metal. (2)
3. Use welding processes to join metal components of a sculpture using butt, lap and/or tee joints. (3)
4. Incorporate assemblage processes and cold connections. (4)
5. Apply mechanical, chemical and/or heat patinas.(5)
6. Create free standing and relief metal sculptures. (6)
7. Compile ideas for sculpture in a sketchbook. (7)
8. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design. (8)
9. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts. (9)
10. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art. (10)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART183 Sculpture: Welded Metal II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 183. Sculpture: Welded Metal II (3). Continued exploration of sculpture using Oxyacetylene torches and GMAW (wire) arc welding processes. Assignments expand personal imagery in metal sculpture. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 182. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Use of tools and materials
2. Safety
3. Cutting and piercing metal
4. Joining metal components of a sculpture using butt, lap and tee joints
5. Assemblage construction methods and cold connections
6. Mechanical finishes and chemical patination of metal
7. Relief and sculpture in the round constructed from metal
8. Personal imagery
9. Sketchbook
10. Formal elements and principles of design
11. Historical and contemporary art examples
12. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create free standing and relief metal sculptures.
2. Incorporate assemblage processes and cold connections.
3. Employ finish applications.
4. Utilize tools and equipment safely.
5. Identify historical and contemporary metal sculptures.
6. Expand personal imagery in metal sculptures.
7. Identify and discuss the elements and principles of design as they relate to sculpture.
8. Use correct terminology.
9. Compile and enhance ideas for sculpture in a sketchbook.
10. Synthesize critiquing skills to evaluate finished sculptures.
11. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
12. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
13. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART190 Oil/Acrylic Painting I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 190. Oil/Acrylic Painting I (3). Study and experimentation in painting techniques employed by modern and old masters. Emphasis on personal creativity and uniqueness of expression. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 110. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to media, techniques and vocabulary
2. Basic color theory
3. Perspective studies
4. Monochromatic studies
5. Color studies
6. Formal elements and principles of design
7. Historical or contemporary art examples
8. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use appropriate tools.
2. Identify chemical differences and applications of oil and acrylic paint.
3. Employ various ground applications.
4. Wash, scumble, drag, dab, and blend.
5. Distinguish the techniques of glazing, alla prima, and other direct and indirect methods paint applications.
6. Use perspective in painting.
7. Utilize value.
8. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
9. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
10. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART194 Watercolor I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 194. Watercolor I (3). Exploration of transparent qualities of watercolor medium. Techniques and materials used to stimulate personal creativity and uniqueness of expression. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 110. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Different water media
2. Materials
a. Brushes and sponges
b. Papers
c. Pigments
3. Techniques
a. Brush strokes
b. Washes
c. Pulling off and scratch techniques
d. Resists
e. Stamping
f. Splatter
4. Formal elements and principles of design
5. Historical and contemporary art examples
6. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Distinguish different water media.
2. Identify and utilize appropriate materials, including brushes, paper and pigments.
3. Apply different techniques of brush strokes and washes.
4. Pull off and scratch.
5. Use resists.
6. Utilize sponging, stamping, and splatter techniques.
7. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
9. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART195 Watercolor II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 195. Watercolor II (3). Independent development using the watercolor medium. Study of varied techniques will be utilized to meet individual needs. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 194. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Review of strokes, washes, paper properties
2. Review of terms and color theory and design principles
3. Basic washes combined with other techniques with subject matter showing textures of various kinds
4. Experimental "splotch" and development
5. Graphite washes
6. Resist techniques and exploration of turpentine build-up as nontraditional resist for texture
7. Wetting both sides of heavier paper (rag-content) and working all through wet-into-wetvarious strengths of pigment to hold
8. Combining techniques with subjects of choice for texture, various washes in combination with techniques of resist, splatter, sand, etc. for texture
9. Development of project with three overlapping ideas about a single person, place, or thing
10. Formal elements and principles of design
11. Historical and contemporary art examples
12. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Students will show perfection of the discipline of loose washes and positive, more spontaneous brush strokes.
2. Students will choose from the various techniques to show reflected light effects, reflections into reflective surfaces, reflected lights and colors of adjacent objects.
3. Students will develop paintings through washes loose to line work as well as developing individual control for wet-into-dry areas.
4. Student will show understanding of corrective techniques.
5. Student will fulfill exercises in text for creative development and experimental techniques.
6. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
7. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
8. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART196 Portraiture I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 196. Portraiture I (3). Emphasis on portraiture techniques for individuals proficient in a specific medium. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 190. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Use of tools and pigment to model a portrait.
2. Proportions and anatomy of head
3. Head studies
a. Light/dark
b. Monochromatic
c. Color
4. Color theory/color contrasts
5. Drapery
6. Connection between design elements and "likeness"
7. Formal elements and principles of design
8. Historical and contemporary art examples
9. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Utilize appropriate tools and media to model a portrait.
2. Identify and depict the structure of head and face.
3. Execute monochromatic or color portrait study.
4. Utilize color contrasts in portrait.
5. Apply painting techniques to depict drapery.
6. Make a connection between design elements and "likeness."
7. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts
9. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts

3
ART202 History Mod/Contemp Art

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 202. History of Modern and Contemporary Art (3). Western art, craft, design and architecture from 1850 to the present. Two and three dimensional art, craft, design and architecture are evaluated in historical and cultural context. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nineteenth Century origins
2. Schools and styles of the Nineteenth Century
3. Succession movements
4. Colonialism and globalization
5. Industrial and commercial design
6. Schools and styles of the Twentieth Century
7. Contemporary schools, styles and criticism
8. Analytical writing and the oral critique
9. Application of principles and elements of design
10. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of art
11. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
12. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-12) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-12) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of Western art. (1-7) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the creation of artifacts. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-10) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of Western art and history. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-12) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of Western art. (1-12) (AH 1-5 ) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-12) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (8-12) (AH 4) (GIH 1,2,4)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
ART203 History of Photography

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 203. History of Photography (3). World history of photography as a form of two dimensional art and visual communication. Historic and contemporary examples of photography evaluated from the origins of the medium to the present. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Nineteenth Century origins
2. Technology and photographic processes
3. Photography as an art form
4. Photography as mass communication
5. Photography as documentation
6. Influence on traditional media
7. Schools and styles of the Nineteenth Century
8. Schools and styles of the Twentieth Century
9. Contemporary schools, styles and criticism
10. Analytical writing and the oral critique
11. Application of principles and elements of design
12. Traditional, historical or contemporary examples of photography
13. Theories, methods and historiography of art history
14. Implication of culture, ethnicity, race and gender on art

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate artifacts though discipline specific theories, methods and historical interpretations. (1-14) (AH 1-5 ) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
2. Compare and contrast artifacts within temporal parameters of course description. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
3. Classify artifacts within their temporal, regional and stylistic context. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (GIH 1,2,4)
4. Define and utilize relevant and appropriate terminology. (1-14) (AH 1-3,5) (ERG 1,3-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
5. Identify artifacts fundamental or pivotal in the development of photography. (1-7) (AH 1-5 ) (GIH 1,2,4)
6. Distinguish and define techniques used in the development of prints. (1-9) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
7. Identify, analyze, synthesize and utilize the principles and elements of design. (1-11) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1,2,4)
8. Evaluate the implications and issues of culture, ethnicity, race and/or gender within the context of world art and history. (1-12) (AH 1-5) (ERG 1-6) (GIH 1,2,4)
9. Formulate questions, make connections, and draw conclusions from formal analysis and critique. (1-14) (AH 1,4) (GIH 1-4)
10. Define the cultural, political, religious, scientific/technological, economic and environmental influences as they affect the development of photography in world art. (1-14) (AH 1-5) (GIH 1-4)
11. Locate, retrieve, and analyze primary and secondary historical sources. (1-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
12. Create, organize and support a thesis in written form. (1-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)
13. Employ accurate and required citation format. (10-14) (AH 4) (GIH 5,6) (LL 1-9) (IL 1-6)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Employ thoughtful and precise writing (a minimum of 2500 words), critical reasoning and analytical discourse through assigned writing tasks, essay examinations, journals, and/or research papers.

3
ART210 Life Drawing I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 210. Life Drawing I (3). Developing skills and expressiveness in drawing a basic form, construction and gesture of the human figure. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 110. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contour drawing
2. Gesture drawing
3. Negative shapes
4. Weight
5. Modeling/value
6. Anatomy and proportion
7. Foreshortening
8. Experimentation with various media
9. Formal elements and principles of design
10. Historical and contemporary art examples
11. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Execute a contour drawing of a human figure.
2. Draw the gesture of a figure.
3. Identify and utilize negative shapes in drawing the figure.
4. Depict weight.
5. Utilize modeling when drawing the figure.
6. Employ anatomy and proportion in drawing.
7. Draw foreshortening.
8. Utilize different media - ink, charcoal, pencil and some color media.
9. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
10. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
11. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART211 Life Drawing II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 211. Life Drawing II (3). Emphasis on drawing forms. Personal growth and individual techniques developed through projects emphasizing various media and techniques in drawing history. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 210. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contour and gesture studies
2. Modeling of figure with value
3. Modeling of figure in color studies
4. Study of bone and muscle structure
5. Completed compositions
6. Experimentation with media
7. Formal elements and principles of design
8. Historical and contemporary art examples
9. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Utilize contour and gesture studies in finished drawings.
2. Model the figure in black and white.
3. Model the figure in color.
4. Identify bone and muscle structure of figure.
5. Develop total design awareness through development of the background and support areas of the figure.
6. Utilize technical skill with various media.
7. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and principles of design.
8. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
9. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART212 Life Painting

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 212. Life Painting (3) (Spring). Techniques of figure painting with an emphasis on the form, construction and gesture of the figure. Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 190. One lecture. Five lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contour and gesture studies
2. Studies in proportion
3. Modeling of figure with value
4. Modeling of figure in color studies
5. Color theory/color contrasts
6. Media experiments
7. Techniques, including wash, glaze and alla prima painting
8. Formal elements and principles of design
9. Historical and contemporary art examples
10. Critique

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Utilize contour and gesture studies in finished paintings.
2. Recognize and utilize proper proportions.
3. Model the figure in black and white.
4. Model the figure in color
5. Utilize color contrasts in developing the figure.
6. Paint with various media.
7. Employ various techniques in figure painting.
8. Identify, analyze and utilize the formal elements and pjrinciples of design.
9. Recognize historical or contemporary examples of the fine arts or crafts.
10. Use media specific terminology to critique and evaluate works of art.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Critique and evaluation of art and artifacts.

3
ART224 Clay/Glaze Chemistry Ceramics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ART 224. Clay and Glaze Chemistry for the Ceramic Artist (3). Introduction and exploration of ceramic materials and application in ceramic artwork Application of design principles. Prerequisite: ART 120. Two lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Clays
a. Origins
b. Composition
c. Physical nature
d. Drying and firing
e. Kinds of clay
f. Mining and preparation
2. Clay Bodies
3. Engobes, Slips and Terra Sigillatas
4. Glazes
a. Nature of glass and glazes
b. Oxides and their function in Glazes
c. Materials
d. Calculation
e. Formation
f. Mixing
g. Firing
h. Flaws
i. Special glazes and surface effects

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the geologic origins of clay.
2. Discuss the composition of typical clay.
3. Explain the physical nature and characteristics of clay.
4. Describe the processes of drying and firing clay.
5. Name different types of clays.
6. Find, process and prepare clay for use in art work.
7. Define, name, compose and test clay bodies.
8. Define, name, create and apply engobes, slips and terra sigillatas.
9. Differentiate distinction between glaze and glass.
10. Identify oxides and their functions in a glaze.
11. Identify a variety of glaze materials and their functions in a glaze.
12. Calculate a glaze.
13. Formulate a glaze.
14. Mix a glaze.
15. Identify the characteristics of fired glazes.
16. Identify and remedy flaws in glazes.
17. Identify and create special glazes and surfaces on ceramic ware.

3
  B.  Music Concentration
       1.  Music Core Requirements (18 credits)
MUS129 Theory Preparation

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 129. Theory Preparation (2). Review and the extensive drilling of the basic elements of music: reading, notation, rhythm, scales, intervals, triads, sight singing, and dictation. Preparation for enrollment in MUS 131. Two lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Notation of pitch
2. Time classifications
3. Note and rest values
4. Time signatures
5. Intervals
6. Scales
7. Key signatures
8. Triads

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Aurally compare the pitches between a major and a minor scale.
2. Aurally identify and notate all simple intervals.
3. Compare the difference between a slur and a tie.
4. Define compound meters.
5. Define the four triad types.
6. Place barlines in a line of music.
7. Describe how a scale may be transposed to any pitch level.
8. Describe how intervals are identified.
9. Describe how intervals are used to construct triads.
10. Describe the accumulative effect of dot(s) on note value.
11. Explain concepts used in determining consonance and dissonance among intervals.
12. Explain the role of the leading tone note in the harmonic minor scale.
13. Explain the significance of the top and bottom number in a meter signature.
14. Identify and notate a major scale.
15. Identify and notate an open position triad.
16. Identify and notate any given interval.
17. Identify and notate given modal scales.
18. Identify and notate the clef symbols.
19. Identify aurally and notate root position triads.
20. Identify each tone placement name (member) of a triad.
21. Identify pitch names of notes on ledger lines.
22. Identify pitch names on the grand staff.
23. Identify the primary triads in a given key, labeling each with the appropriate Roman numeral.
24. Identify, by sight and sound, simple and compound metered music.
25. List five song associations with interval names.
26. List structural characteristics of a melody.
27. List the modal scale names.
28. List two aids used in identifying intervals.
29. Notate a chromatic scale.
30. Perform rhythmic exercises in simple and compound meters.
31. Sight sing simple melodies.

2
MUS131 Basic Integrated Theory I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 131. Basic Integrated Theory I (4). Basic theory of music including part writing, ear training, sight singing, dictation and keyboard harmony. Review of musical notation, intervals, triads and scales. Part writing skills for root position, first and second inversion triads; sight singing and dictation skills through scale passages including intervals of 3rd and 4ths and simple beat divisions. Required of music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 129. Four lecture. One lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The structure of tonality
2. Part writing of triads in root position: doubling and spacing
3. Part writing of triads in root position: voice leading
4. Part writing of triads in first and second inversions
5. Ear training: identifying and constructing intervals and triads
6. Tonal and rhythmic memory through dictation: notating rhythmic patterns and melodic passages
7. From sight to sound, the inner hearing of written music by sight singing melodies in major and minor keys

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Categorize and list in order from tonic to leading tone the correct Roman numeral and write all the major, minor, augmented and diminished triads in any major or minor key.
2. Select the correct chords and illustrate on staff paper the proper doubling and spacing of each triad in a four-part choral.
3. Determine the correct interval number and quality and the correct triad quality; the interval and triad on staff paper.
4. Develop tonal and rhythmic memory and write simple and compound rhythmic patterns and short melodic passages.
5. Recite or sing from a printed manuscript a melody never before heard or sung.

4
MUS132 Basic Integrated Theory II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 132. Basic Integrated Theory II (4). Correlating part writing, ear training, sight singing, dictation and keyboard harmony. Part writing skills in phrase structure and cadences, harmony progression, harmonization techniques and use of non-harmonic tones; sight singing and dictation skills through minor scale passages, intervals of 5ths through the octave and 16th note beat divisions. Required of music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 131. Four lecture. One lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Four part vocal harmonic concepts including inversions, 7th chords, non-harmonic tones, modulation to related keys, secondary dominants and basic song forms
2. Composition and performance of music in basic piano styles
3. Analysis technics in vocal chorale and piano styles
4. Realization of vocal chorale and piano styles at the keyboard
5. Aural dictation and vocal sight reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Demonstrate the structure of tonality; doubling, spacing and voice leading of 1st and 2nd version triads and dominant 7th chords with piano application.
2. Compose and perform basic piano styles.
3. Demonstrate harmonic analysis of chorale and piano styles.
4. Demonstrate other dominant function 7th chords.
5. Demonstrate modulation to related keys.
6. Demonstrate non-dominant 7th chords and compounds meters.
7. Demonstrate secondary dominants.
8. Identify basic song forms and subdivided rhythmic patterns.
9. Analyze and use non-harmonic tones.
10. Exercise keyboard skills sufficient to perform class assignments.
11. Demonstrate vocal interpretation of music through sight singing.

4
MUS231 Adv Integrated Theory I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 231. Advanced Integrated Theory I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMUS 2222. Advanced theory of music correlating concepts of part writing, sight singing, ear training, dictation and keyboard harmony. Part writing skills using 7th chords, secondary dominants and altered non-harmonic tones, modulation and borrowed chords; sight singing and dictation skills through altered intervals and syncopated rhythms; keyboard skills realizing a figured bass. Required of music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 132. Four lecture. One lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The common 7th chords in all inversions
2. Altered non-harmonic tones and chords
3. Borrowed dominants and leading tone chords
4. Altered non-harmonic tones and altered chords in modulation to closely related keys 9th, 11th and 13th chords
5. Neopolitan and augmented 6th chords
6. Musical form analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Aural identification of above concepts through dictation
2. Analytical techniques for above concepts in chorale and piano styles
3. Keyboard application in chorale and piano styles of above conceptsIdentify the common 7th chords.
4. Identify altered non-harmonic tones and chords.
5. Identify borrowed dominants and leading tone chords.
6. Use modulation using the above concepts.
7. Identify other borrowed chords.
8. Identify 9th, 11th and 13th chords.
9. Identify neopolitan and augmented 6th chords.
10. Develop form and analysis.
11. Develop vocal interpretation of music through sight singing.

4
MUS232 Adv Integrated Theory II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 232. Advanced Integrated Theory II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMUS 2223. Correlating advanced concepts of part writing, sight singing, ear training, dictation and keyboard harmony. Part writing skills using augmented 6th chords, chromatic mediants and modulations to foreign keys, sight singing and dictation skills through two, three and four parts; keyboard skills realizing a figured bass. Required of music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 231. Four lecture. One lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contemporary compositional devices and techniques
2. Aural and analytical identification and sight singing of materials employing the above concepts

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify 9th, 11th, and 13th chords.
2. Identify exotic scales.
3. Identify chords of addition and omission.
4. Identify quartal harmonies and planning.
5. Identify contemporary cadences.
6. Identify 12 tone technics.
7. Identify interval sets and other technics.
8. Identify aural and analytical identification of above concepts.
9. Identify vocal chorale style and piano applications of above concept.

4
       2.  Music Electives: Select 8 credit hours
MUS101 Private Music I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 101. Private Music I (1). Individual, self-paced instruction in piano, organ, voice, guitar, band or orchestra instruments. Open to all students in the college.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Pitch and rhythmic notation
2. Tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Performance of selected studies and compositions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Read and apply pitch and rhythmic notation. (1)
2. Produce the quality of tone appropriate for genre and level of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Apply styles, phrasing, and performances practices appropriate for the various periods, genre, and level of music studied. (1-4)

1
MUS102 Private Music II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 102. Private Music II (1). Individual, self-paced instruction in piano, organ, voice, guitar, band or orchestra instruments. Open to all students in the college. Prerequisite: MUS 101.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sight-reading techniques
2, Tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Performance of selected studies and compositions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Sight read using techniques appropriate to level of music studied and/or performed. (1)
2. Produce the quality of tone appropriate for genre and level of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Apply styles, phrasing, and performances practices appropriate for the various periods, genre, and level of music studied. (1-4)

1
MUS103 Piano Class I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 103. Piano Class I (1). A skill-building piano lab with an emphasis on piano playing and music reading. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in playing the piano
2. Reading beginning-level piano literature
3. Beginning-level music theory

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Play on the piano beginning-level literature in the keys of C and G major.
2. Count and play on the piano beginning-level rhythms in duple, triple and quadruple meters in both simple and compound division of the beat.
3. Play on the piano all major, minor, diminished and augmented chords in root position.
4. Play on the piano scales and I, IV and V7 chord progressions in C and G major.
5. Assign names on a written test to pitches, chords, intervals and key signatures.

1
MUS104 Piano Class II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 104. Piano Class II (1). Skill-building piano lab for students with limited piano experience. Emphasis on piano playing, music reading, and music theory. Prerequisite: MUS 103. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in playing the piano.
2. Playing beginning-level piano literature in five keys.
3. Beginning-level music theory.
4. Beginning-level key transposition.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Play on the piano beginning-level literature in the keys of G and F major, and A and D minor.
2. Count and play on the piano intermediate-level rhythms in duple, triple, and quadruple meters in both simple and compound division of the beat.
3. Write on staff paper:
a. pitch names is bass and treble clef
b. major, minor, diminished and augmented chords in root position
c. interval names of 3rd and 5ths
d. key signatures.
4. Play on the piano scales and I, IV, and V7 chord progressions in the major keys of C, G, and F, and the minor keys of A and D.
5. Transpose beginning-level songs into the keys of C, G, and F major.

1
MUS105 Voice Class I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 105. Voice Class I (1). Fundamentals of singing. Includes breath support and articulation while singing and introductory-level music reading. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing.
2. Reading vocal solo literature.
3. In-class performance.
4. Introductory-level music reading.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing.
2. Use standard breath support while singing.
3. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing.
4. Perform selected examples of solo literature.
5. Model professional stage deportment.
6. Sight-read melodies in the key of C major and clap rhythms in duple, triple, and quadruple meters (using both simple and compound division of the beat).
7. Identify an assigned set of music vocabulary words.

1
MUS106 Voice Class II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 106. Voice Class II (1). Intermediate voice class designed to advance individual singing skills by study and training in singing technique, musicianship, diction, performance and in repertoire. Prerequisite: MUS 105. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The voice
a. Physiology and function of the vocal mechanism
b. Coordination of breathing, relaxation and phonation to produce a tension-free, resonant, pleasant, even-scaled singing voice.
c. Building an accurate keyboard in the voice
d. The energy and physical health necessary for singing
e. Blending techniques for singers in ensembles and choral singing
2. Musicianship
a. Knowing scales
b. Singing intervals accurately
c. Rhythm, tempos, the beat
d. Phrasing
e. Musical terms and their application
3. Performance techniques
a. Study and use of good diction
b. Study of styles of songs
c. Study of styles of songs
d. Techniques of memorization
e. Understanding and overcoming stage fright
f. Study and practice of effective stage presence
4. Literature
a. Song literature, its composers and performers
b. Singing a variety of examples in class
c. The use of singing voices in music literature

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Understand the functions of vocal mechanism, learn to coordinate breathing and relaxation in order to produce tension-free singing sounds and an even singing scale through the voice; improve resonance and projection of the voice for solo performance and blending techniques of the singing voice for ensemble and choral singing.
2. Improve level of musicianship by learning musical terms and their application, by demonstrating improvement in intonation, rhythm skills, interval skips, phrasing, and flexibility of voice.
3. Learn to perform successfully in public through the study and practice of clear diction in singing, study of style and interpretation of songs, and experience in effective stage presence.
4. Demonstrate knowledge of repertoire through the study of song literature, the facets of the use of voices in music literature and awareness of composers and performers.
5. Demonstrate improvement in public performance by presenting a recital of songs at the close of the semester. Besides performing individually students will each write critique of the other performances demonstrating ability to recognize aspects of technique, musicianship and performance.

1
MUS107 Guitar Class I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 107. Guitar Class I (1). Beginning instruction on acoustic guitar. Chords and chord strumming, note reading, finger styles and basic music theory. Opportunities to explore classical, folk, and blues styles of playing. No guitars provided. Two lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to the guitar
2. Introduction to the musical terms and notations
3. Two tuning methods
4. Note reading performance skills; duets in the classical style
5. Chord studies and strumming in the folk style
6. Right and left hand skill studies--scales arpeggios
7. Repertoire--melodic and chord style music

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify parts of guitar.
2. Know guitar terms.
3. Know musical terms.
4. Demonstrate tuning.
5. Demonstrate note reading--pitch and rhythm
6. Identify chords--symbols and fingering positions.
7. Develop finger dexterity--right and left hand.

1
MUS108 Guitar Class II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 108. Guitar Class II (1). Emphasis on bar chords, note reading through the ninth position, double notes, and solos from classical, flamenco, or folk styles of playing. Prerequisite: MUS 107. Two lab. (Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.) S/U grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Playing position
2. Right-hand technique
3. Left-hand technique
4. Rest strokes
5. Free strokes
6. Arpeggios
7. Chords
8. Bar chords, forms I-II
9. Sight reading
10. Note reading through the ninth position
11. Warm-up exercises
12. Stretching exercises
13. Scales
14. Ascending legados
15. Descending legados
16. Strums
17. Guitar styles
18. Harmonic tuning

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Read and play chord structures. (7, 8, 12-15)
2. Identify and use different guitar styles. (16-17)
3. Use developed skills in harmonic tuning. (18)
4. Read music in basic position. (1)
5. Play to the ninth position. (10-12)
6. Use basic right and left hand techniques. (2, 3)
7. Read and play music with individual style and music selection with instructor supervision. (1-12, 14-16)

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MUS109 Guitar Class III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 109. Guitar Class III (1). Emphasis on repertoire, ensemble, sight reading, and performance. Prerequisite: MUS 108. Two lab. (Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.)

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Playing position
2. Right-hand techniques
3. Left-hand techniques
4. Rest strokes
5. Free strokes
6. Arpeggios
7. Chords
8. Bar chords forms I-V
9. Note reading in all positions
10. Warm-up exercises
11. Stretching exercises
12. Scales (Sagreras-Segovia)
13. Ascending legados
14. Descending legados
15. Advanced strums
16. Finger-picking styles
17. Guitar styles
18. Harmonic tuning

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Read and play using concepts of complex chord structures. (7, 8, 12)
2. Identify and use different guitar styles. (15-17)
3. Use harmonic tuning skills from one string. (18)
4. Sight read in all positions. (9)
5. Use advanced right and left hand techniques. (2, 3)
6. Read and play music with individual style and music selection. (1-18)

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MUS110 Concert Band

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 110. Concert Band (1). Instruction and performance of concert band literature in a group setting. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Holding position of instruments
2. Breathing technique for wind instruments
3. Articulation technique for wind instruments
4. Stick and mallet grips for percussion instruments
5. Musical notation and musical terms
6. Major scales
7. Group rehearsal of concert band literature

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Read and perform major scales. (1-7)
2. Read and perform common rhythms. (1-7)
3. Read and perform common rudiments (percussionists). (1-5, 7)
4. Perform concert band literature within a group. (1-7).

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MUS111 Symphonic Band

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 111. Symphonic Band (1). Open to all students in the College. Attendance at all rehearsals and participation in all public performances is required. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb, F concert scales
2. Division of the beat through 16th notes in simple and compound meters
3. Selected band literature with emphasis on interpretation of symbols, terms, control of pitch, balance tone quality, style, articulation and precision

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform scales in the common band keys.
2. Perform musical notational symbols and terms.
3. Demonstrate rhythmic patterns in common meters.
4. Develop concepts of correct pitch, balance, tone quality, style, articulation and precision.
5. Determine concepts of the individual's roll in preparation and performance of band music.

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MUS112 Jazz/Rock Ensemble

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 112. Jazz/Rock Ensemble (1). Study and performance of a wide range of jazz, rock, and popular music. Audition required. Three lab. (Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.)

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Rehearsal and performance of music specifically written for the jazz/rock ensemble or jazz combo
2. Jazz/rock articulation, phrasing, improvisation and musical styles
3. Articulation and rhythm drills
4. Pitch for exact intonation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform jazz, rock, and popular music styles. (1-4)
2. Develop and perform music articulation and phrase patterns. (1-4)
3.Recognize and perform rhythmic alteration (syncopation), improvisation, and melodic alteration (blue notes). (1-4)

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MUS113 Big Band I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 113. Big Band I (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected intermediate level jazz literature. Audition required. Additional required performances. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 2 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scales required of selected intermediate level jazz music
2. Division and subdivision of the beat in simple, common and mixed meters
3. Intermediate level jazz literature with emphasis on interpretation of symbols, terms, control of pitch, balance, tone quality, style, articulation and precision

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform common intermediate level big band keys. (1)
2. Perform intermediate level rhythmic patterns in various meters. (2)
3. Perform with correct pitch, tone quality, style and articulation. (3)
4. Perform intermediate level jazz music. (1-3)

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MUS114 Big Band II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 114. Big Band II (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected advanced level jazz literature. Audition required Additional required performances. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 2 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scales required of selected advanced level jazz music
2. Division and subdivision of the beat in simple, common and mixed meters
3. Advanced level jazz literature with emphasis on interpretation of symbols, terms, control of pitch, balance, tone quality, style, articulation and precision

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform common advanced level big band keys. (1)
2. Perform advanced level rhythmic patterns in various meters. (2)
3. Perform with correct pitch, tone quality, style and articulation. (3)
4. Perform advanced level jazz music. (1-3)

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MUS115 Instrumental Ensemble:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 115. Instrumental Ensemble (1). Music reading skills, playing techniques, ensemble playing. Performance participation required. Audition required. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Critical analysis of music
2. Vocabulary and language of music
3. Transpositions, clefs and standard notational symbols
4. Performance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use transpositions, different clefs and standard notational symbols while performing music. (2, 4)
2. Identify, analyze, and perform different pieces of music within the same genre. (1-4)
3. Identify elements of music from diverse genres and cultures. (1-3)
4. Sight-read music accurately and with expression. (4)

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MUS116 Jazz Combo

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 116. Jazz Combo (1). Jazz music reading skills, playing techniques, ensemble playing. Performance participation required. Three Lab. (Repeatable for a total fo 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.)

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Critical analysis of jazz and popular music
2. Vocabulary and language of jazz and popular music
3. Jazz and popular music memorization
4. Performance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use jazz notation symbols while performing music. (1-4)
2. Memorize and perform jazz and popular music in a small group setting. (1-4)
3. Identify elements of music from diverse genres and culture. (1,2)
4. Improvise music with expression. (1-4)

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MUS117 Symphony Orchestra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 117. Symphony Orchestra (1). Symphony orchestra rehearsal and performance. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scales required of selected music
2. Division and subdivision of the beat in simple and compound meters
3. Selected orchestral literature with emphasis on interpretation of symbols, terms, control of pitch, balance, tone quality, style, articulation and precision

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform common orchestral keys.
2. Perform rhythmic patterns in various meters.
3. Perform with correct pitch, tone quality, style and articulation.
4. Perform orchestral music.

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MUS151 Applied Music I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 151. Applied Music I (2). Individual instruction in piano, organ, voice, guitar, band or orchestra instruments for music majors.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Applied music fundamentals
2. Theory and development of tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Development of musicianship through performance of selected studies and compositions in the various musical periods

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply music fundamentals appropriate to level and area of study. (1)
2. Apply theory and development of tone production for level and genre of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Play or sing using styles and performance practices of the various musical periods. (4)
5. Perform progressively advanced compositions in lessons, recitals, juries, and concerts. (1-4)

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MUS152 Applied Music II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 152. Applied Music II (2). Individual instruction in piano, organ, voice, guitar, band or orchestra instruments for music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 151.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Applied music fundamentals
2. Theory and development of tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Development of musicianship through performance of selected studies and compositions in the various musical periods

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply music fundamentals appropriate to level and area of study. (1)
2. Apply theory and development of tone production for level and genre of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Perform progressively advanced compositions in lessons, recitals, juries, and concerts. (1-4)

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MUS190 Oratorio:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 190. Oratorio: (1) (Fall). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral selections from major choral works. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Phonation
2. Posture
3. Articulation
4. Choruses from major choral works
5. Public performance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Sing with accurate tempo, pitch, rhythm, dynamic levels and phrasing. (1)
2. Sing using correct posture and breathing techniques. (2)
3. Sing with clear enunciation, pronunciation and proper vowel and consonant formation. (3)
4. Sing chorus selections from major choral works. (4)
5. Apply learned rehearsal techniques and perform with appropriate deportment in public venues. (5)

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MUS198 Music Topics:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 198. Music Topics: (1). Exploration of music techniques and expression. One lecture. [Repeatable for a total of 2 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Music techniques and processes
2. Personalized expression
3. Performance of musical works
4. Critique
5. Historical and/or contemporary musical examples

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explore music techniques and processes (1)
2. Apply techniques to personal expression (2)
3. Perform musical works (3)
4. Critique musical works (4)
5. Identify musical examples (5)

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MUS201 Private Music III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 201. Private Music III (1). Individual, self-paced instruction in piano, organ, guitar, voice, band or orchestra instruments. Open to all students in the college. Prerequisite: MUS 102.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sight-reading techniques
2. Tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Performance of selected studies and compositions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1.Sight read using techniques appropriate to level of music studied and/or performed. (1)
2. Produce the quality of tone appropriate for genre and level of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Apply styles, phrasing, and performances practices appropriate for the various periods, genre, and level of music studied. (1-4)

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MUS202 Private Music IV

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 202. Private Music IV (1). Individual, self paced instruction in piano, organ, guitar, voice, band or orchestral instruments. Open to all students in the college. Prerequisite: MUS 201. (Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.)

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sight-reading techniques
2. Tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Performance of selected studies and compositions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use notation at level of music studied and/or performed. (1)
2. Produce the quality of tone appropriate for genre and level of study. (2-4)
3. Play or sing with technical facility for genre and level of study. (2-4)
4. Use styles, phrasing, and performance practices appropriate for the various periods, genre, and level of music studied. (1-4)

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MUS203 Piano Class III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 203. Piano Class III (1). Designed for students with some piano experience. Emphasis on advanced accompaniment skills. Prerequisite: MUS 104. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sight reading: progressively more difficult compositions
2. Technique: variety of fingering patterns and chord shapes; interpretation of dynamics and melody/accompaniment balance
3. Theory: all major and harmonic minor scales, two or more octaves; all dominant seventh chords in all positions
4. Repertoire: early level intermediate literature, ensemble pieces
5. Functional skills: transposition of melodies extending beyond 5-finger positions; harmonization of melodies using more diverse harmonies; improvisation of melodies with various accompaniment styles

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Demonstrate sight-reading skills in upper level elementary piano compositions.
2. Demonstrate technical skills in playing fingering patterns, scales, and chords.
3. Demonstrate ability to perform lower level intermediate piano literature.
4. Develop more advanced skills in transposition, harmonization, and improvisation.

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MUS204 Piano Class IV

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 204. Piano Class IV (1). Designed for students with some piano experience. Emphasis on interpretation. Prerequisite: MUS 203. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sight reading: progressively more difficult compositions
2. Technique: fluency in tempos of performed literature; scale studies and arpeggios; chromatic scale fingering
3. Theory: five kinds of seventh chords
4. Repertoire: upper level intermediate literature; ensemble pieces
5. Functional skills: transposition of folk-type melodies with various accompaniment figures; harmonization of melodies using nay chords within a key and borrowed, or altered, chords; improvisation of melodies and accompaniments using acquired harmonization skills

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Demonstrate sight reading skills in lower level intermediate piano literature.
2. Demonstrate more advanced skills in playing various finger patterns, scales, and chords.
3. Demonstrate ability to perform upper level intermediate piano literature.
4. Develop intermediate level skills in transposition, harmonization, and improvisation.

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MUS222 Chamber Singers

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 222. Chamber Singers (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral literature. Membership by audition. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing
2. Reading choral literature
3. Public performance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public. (3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

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MUS223 Vocal Ensemble

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 223. Vocal Ensemble (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral literature. No audition required. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing.
2. Singing choral literature.
3. Public performance.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public.(3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

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MUS224 Master Chorale

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 224. Master Chorale (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected major choral literature. Membership by audition. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing.
2. Singing choral literature.
3. Public performance.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public.(3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

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MUS225 Community Chorale

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 225. Community Chorale (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral literature. No audition required. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing.
2. Reading choral literature.
3. Public performance.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public.(3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

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MUS226 Chamber Choir

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 226. Chamber Choir (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral literature. Membership by audition. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing.
2. Singing choral literature.
3. Public performance.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public.(3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

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MUS227 Women's Chorale

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 227. Women's Chorale (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral literature. Audition required. Three lab. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.]

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing.
2. Singing choral literature.
3. Public performance.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public.(3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. In-class video/audio performance, public performance.

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MUS228 Gospel Choir

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 228. Gospel Choir (1). Rehearsal and performance of selected choral literature. Membership open with no audition required. [Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.] Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Technical skill in singing
2. Reading choral literature
3. Public performance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use standard postures while singing. (1)
2. Articulate (vowel and consonant formation) while singing. (1)
3. Sing assigned voice part while in a group. (2)
4. Perform selected examples of choral literature in public.(3)
5. Model professional stage deportment during public performance. (3)

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MUS251 Applied Music III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 251. Applied Music III (2). Individual instruction in piano, organ, voice, guitar, band or orchestra instruments. For music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 152.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Applied music fundamentals
2. Theory and development of tone production
3. Technical facility
4. Studies and compositions for sight reading and/or transposition
5. Development of musicianship through performance of selected studies and compositions in the various musical periods

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply music fundamentals appropriate to level and area of study. (1)
2. Apply theory and development of tone production for level and genre of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Sight read and/or transpose studies and compositions of appropriate difficulty for genre and level of study. (4)
5. Apply styles and performance practices of the various musical periods. (5)
6. Perform advanced compositions in lessons, recitals, juries, and concerts. (1-5)

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MUS252 Applied Music IV

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 252. Applied Music IV (2). Individual instruction in piano, organ, voice, guitar, band or orchestra instruments. For music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 251. (Repeatable for a total of 4 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.)

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Applied music fundamentals
2. Theory and development of tone production
3. Development of technical facility
4. Sight-reading and/or transposition for studies and compositions
5. Development of musicianship through performance of selected studies and compositions in the various musical periods

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply music fundamentals appropriate to area of study. (1)
2. Apply theory and development of tone production for genre and level of study. (2)
3. Play or sing with technical facility appropriate for genre and level of study. (3)
4. Use styles and performance practices of the various musical periods. (5)
5. Perform advanced compositions in lessons, recitals, and juries. (5)
6. Sight-read and/or transpose studies and compositions of appropriate difficulty for genre and level of study. (4)

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MUS296 Internship: Music

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MUS 296. Internship: Music (3). Supervised field experience with businesses, corporations, government agencies, schools and community organizations to expand career interests and apply subject knowledge relevant to the workplace. Individualized internship placements to develop personal and professional skills, including professional ethics, leadership, and civic responsibility. Prerequisite: Student must have a GPA of 2.0; have completed specific degree requirements as required by the program; and have completed the internship application process. Three lecture. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.] S/U grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Organizational overview of assigned placement
2. Integration of job description and organization's requirements
3. Elements of documentation of experience
4. Planning and time management
5. Professional, legal, and ethical issues
6. Communication, critical thinking, and problem solving
7. Specialized equipment, tools, and software required in the placement

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Exhibit appropriate workplace behaviors and professional ethics.
2. Apply discipline specific knowledge and skills in the professional workplace.
3. Define and utilize technical terms in written and oral communications.
4. Use critical thinking, problem solving, ethical awareness, and effective writing
5. Interpret written and oral instructions.
6. Initiate and complete assigned responsibilities.
7. Maintain documentation required to comply with government employer or nonprofit agency regulations.
8. Use specialized equipment, software, and tools as required.
9. Analyze and interpret data for specified reports.
10. Identify opportunities for improvement in process and documentation related to the workplace.
11. Articulate job description and position in assigned organization.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Record of Student Internship workplace hours.
2. Individual Education Plan (IEP) as approved by supervision faculty.
3. A daily journal, or work log of tasks, including dates, descriptive comments, problems and solutions.
4. A reflective paper or project as specified by the supervision faculty.
5. A minimum of two evaluations by the workplace employer or supervisor.
6. Student's self-evaluation of experience.

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Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.