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Program Contacts

Prescott Advising Prescott Academic Advising (928) 776-2106
Verde Advising Verde Valley Academic Advising (928) 634-6510
Dean Dean Holbrook (928) 717-7693

Quick Facts

  • 2014-2015  Catalog Year view other years
  • Minimum Credits Required:  60
  • This program can be completed entirely online
  • Transfer Options:  Multiple - See Advisor
  • View the Degree Plan

About the Associate of Arts

The Associate of Arts degree requires completion of 60 credit hours. This degree is designed to enable a student to transfer to a baccalaureate-granting institution. Students following this degree program will complete university-parallel requirements in general education that will fulfill all lower division general education requirements at the Arizona universities. The AA degree will allow students with declared majors to fulfill their lower division major requirements at Yavapai College and is also appropriate for the liberal arts major and the transfer-oriented student who is undecided about either major area of study or the transfer institution.

Thirty-five hours of coursework are concentrated in general education. At Yavapai College the Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC-A) is embedded in the Associate of Arts degree. Arizona General Education (AGEC) special requirements incorporate additional university requirements in Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR), Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) Awareness, and Global/International and Historical (GIH) Awareness areas*. 

The core curriculum consists of three parts: (A) Foundation Studies include critical literacy, precise writing, qualitative thinking, and the process of analysis and synthesis that underlie logical reasoning; (B) Core Studies focus on the conceptual frameworks through which a thinker, a culture, or an academic discipline may approach an issue; (C) Area Studies link foundation skills in thinking and communicating and the core emphasis on conceptual frameworks to the content orientation of academic disciplines.

Three credit hours of communications coursework are required for this degree. Twenty-two credit hours of coursework in this degree are in major and elective studies (accepted prefixes listed below). Upon completion of all 35 credit hours (including the special requirements) of the AGEC with a grade of “C” or higher, the student will receive recognition of completion on their Yavapai College transcript.

Students preparing to transfer to an upper-division baccalaureate degree program should contact an academic advisor in the major field of study at the transfer institution in addition to meeting regularly with an academic advisor at Yavapai College. Regular advisement is important to build an educational plan and ensure transferability of general education, elective, and major courses. Students intending to transfer to one of the Arizona public universities can obtain specific information on transferability of courses from the course applicability system (CAS) website at www.aztransfer.com and curriculum transfer guides available from advisors. Transfer guides are also available from each university's web site.

Note: *AGEC Special Awareness Requirements Students must complete a course from each of the following areas:

  • Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR) 
  • ​Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) awareness
  • Global/International or Historical (GIH) awareness
 

General Educational Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education (35 credits)
  A.  Foundation Studies (9 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT142 College Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 142. College Mathematics (3). Survey of mathematical topics and applications. Includes statistics, probability, exponential functions, finance, dimensional analysis and other selected discrete math topics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Algebraic Models of Growth and Decay
2. Mathematics of Personal Finance
3. Counting and Probability
4. Descriptive Statistics and the Normal Distribution
5. Dimensional Analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Create and apply linear, quadratic and exponential models. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Apply the mathematics of personal finance, including compound interest, annuities, and amortized loans. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Apply the basic rules of counting: fundamental counting principle, permutations, and combinations to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply basic rules of probability including compound events, conditional probability, and expected value to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Calculate and interpret graphical and numerical summaries of data, including measures of central tendency and dispersion. (4) (QL 1-4)
6. Use the basic properties of the Normal curve to solve applied problems. (4) (QL 1-4)
7. Use dimensional analysis to make conversions with metric and U.S. measurement systems. (5) (QL 1-4)

3
OR MAT152 College Algebra

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 152. College Algebra (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1151. Modeling of applications using linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Introduction to solving systems of equations using matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear Functions
2. Quadratic and other nonlinear functions
3. Exponential and logarithmic functions
4. Polynomial functions
5. Systems of equations and matrices
6. Technology in mathematics

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use technology to recognize trends in data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL1-4)
2. Create suitable functions that model data using technology. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-3)
3. Analyze an application using a function developed from data. (1,2,3,4,6) (QL 1-4)
4. Add, subtract and multiply matrices in the context of an application. (5,6) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Solve a system of equations using matrices and technology. (5,6) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT156 Math/Elementary Teachers I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 156. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes problem solving, set theory, properties and operations with number systems. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Problem solving strategies
2. Set theory and set operations.
3. Properties and operations with whole numbers
4. Properties and operations using other bases
5. Properties and operations with integers
6. Properties and operations with rational numbers
7. Properties and operations with decimal numbers
8. Number theory of primes, composites, and factors
9. Percents, ratios and proportions

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use Polya's Four Step Model when problem-solving. (1) (QL 2,4)
2. Use set notation and perform set operations using listed sets and Venn Diagrams. (2) (QL 1)
3. Solve whole number operations and explain the algorithms used. (3) (QL 1,4)
4. Solve problems in other number bases. (4) (QL 1)
5. Solve integer number operations and explain the algorithms used. (5) (QL 1,4)
6. Solve rational number operations and explain the algorithms used. (6) (QL 1,4)
7. Solve decimal number operations and explain the algorithms used. (7) (QL 1,4)
8. Categorize numbers as prime and composite and find GCD and LCM. (8) (QL 1)
9. Solve problems using percents, ratios and proportiions. (9) (QL 2,4)

3
OR MAT157 Math/Elementary Teachers II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 157. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3). Mathematical principles and processes specifically for elementary teachers. Includes geometry, measurement, statistics, and probability. Note: Computer use required. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Geometric shapes and definitions
2. Symmetry
3. Similarity
4. Measurement using the U.S. system and the metric system
5. Perimeter, area, surface area and volume of geometric figures
6. Euclidean construction
7. Topics in Statistics including graphs and measures of central tendency and variability
8. Probability
9. Counting techniques including combinations and permutation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Recognize geometrical shapes and describe their properties. (1) (QL 1)
2. Observe symmetry in geometric shapes. (2) (QL 1)
3. Use similarity to solve problems. (3) (QL 1,2)
4. Use measuring units including metric units. (4) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Find perimeter, area, surface area, and volumes of geometric objects. (5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Perform Euclidean constructions. (6) (QL 1)
7. Convert data from table format to graphical format. (7) (QL 3)
8. Analyze data statistically using basic measures of central tendency and measures of variability. (7) (QL 1-3)
9. Calculate the probability of the outcomes of simple experiments. (8) (QL 1-3)
10. Use counting techniques including permutations and combinations. (9) (QL 1,2)

3
OR MAT167 Elementary Statistics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 167. Elementary Statistics (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1160. Statistical tools and techniques used in research and general applications. Description of sample data, probability and probability distributions, point and interval estimates of population parameters, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 142 or 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Descriptive statistics
2. Probability
3. Normal distribution
4. Research design
5. Sampling strategies
6. Confidence intervals
7. Hypotheses testing of one population
8. Hypothesis testing of two population
9. Tests of categorical data
10. Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Tables
11. Regression and correlation
12. Statistics technology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use both numerical and graphical methods to describe data. (1) (QL 1,3)
2. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variability. (1) (QL 1-3)
3. Compute probabilities for both simple and compound events. (2) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Apply the normal distribution to probability problems and estimation of population parameters. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
5. Critique the research methods of others, and use research methodology. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
6. Produce representative random samples. (5) (QL 1,4)
7. Calculate and interpret confidence intervals as estimates of population parameters. (6) (QL 1-4)
8. Perform hypothesis tests about means and other parameters from large and small samples using one and multiple sample methods. (7,8) (QL 1-4)
9. Test hypothesis about categorical data. (9) (QL 1-4)
10. Recognize appropriate use of Goodness-of-Fit and Contingency Table tests. (10) (QL 1-3)
11. Use regression and correlation to test hypothesis and create models for bivariate data. (11) (QL 1-4)
12. Use both hand-held calculators and desktop computers to perform statistical analysis. (12) (QL 1)

3
OR MAT172 Finite Mathematics

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 172. Finite Mathematics (3). Various analytic methods employed in business, social and life sciences with an emphasis on applications. Topics include algebra review, linear programming, matrix operations, linear systems of equations, set theory, counting, probability and statistics. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Linear functions and their graphs
2. Matrices
3. Linear systems of equations
4. Linear programming
5. Set theory
6. Counting techniques
7. Probability theory
8. Statistics
9. Finance problems

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Perform elementary matrix operations including addition, subtraction, multiplication and inversion. (2) (QL 1-3)
2. Solve n-by-m linear systems of equations using elementary row operations. (1,3) (QL 1,2,4)
3. Solve linear programming problems by graphical and algebraic techniques. (1,4) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Perform the basic operations of union, intersection and complement on sets. (5) (QL 1)
5. Use Venn diagrams, combinations and permutations in applications involving counting. (6) (QL 1)
6. Evaluate probabilities of simple, compound, independent and dependent events. (7) (QL 1-4)
7. Compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a collection of statistical data. (8) (QL 1-4)
8. Apply the theory of normal and binomial probability distributions to statistics problems. (8) (QL 1-3)
9. Compute the present value of an annuity, interest on mortgages, and cash flow. (9) (QL 1,2,4)

3
OR MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

5
OR MAT212 Survey of Calculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 212. Survey of Calculus (3). Introduction to the theory, techniques and applications of the differential and integral calculus of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, life, and social sciences. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 152 or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Limits and continuity
2. Derivatives
3. The laws of differentiation
4. Integration
5. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 1-4)
2. Evaluate limits. (1) (QL 1-4)
3. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,4)
4. Determine maxima and minima of functions by applying differentiation. (2,3) (QL 1,2)
5. Use calculus to analyze and graph functions. (2,5) (QL 1,2,4)
6. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (4,5) (QL 1,4)

3
OR MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
  B.  Core Studies (6 credits)
       1.  Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose from Approved List
 
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Historical Perspective (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the historical perspective (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
HIS131 United States History I   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS132 United States History II   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS201 Western Civilization I   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS202 Western Civilization II   IWR ERG GIH 3
HIS205 World History   IWR ERG GIH 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Critical Thinking (3 credits) 
Choose from Approved List
 
Show / hide all critical thinking (agec) courses

Critical Thinking (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the critical thinking (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AHS230 Comp & Alt Health Therapy   3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice   3
BSA118 Practical Creative Thinking   3
CHP190 Honors Colloquium   1
COM217   
EDU210 Cultural Diversity Education   ERG 3
ENG140 Reading the World:   3
GEO210 Society and Environment   3
HUM101 Intro to Popular Culture   3
JRN131 Mass Media in American Society   3
PHI103 Intro to Logic   3
PHI105 Introduction to Ethics   3
PHI110 Intro to Critical Thinking   3
PHI204 Ethical Issues/Health Care   3
STU230 Leadership Development Studies   3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  C.  Area Studies (20 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (8 credits)
Choose from Approved List - GLG100 must be taken with one other 2 credit GLG course
 
Show / hide all physical & biological science courses

Physical & Biological Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biological science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
AGS103   
BIO100 Biology Concepts   4
BIO103   
BIO105 Environmental Biology   4
BIO107 Introduction to Biotechnology   4
BIO108 Concepts in Plant Biology   4
BIO109 Natural History Southwest   4
BIO156 Human Biology Allied Health   4
BIO160 Intro Human Anat & Physiology   4
BIO181 General Biology I   4
BIO182 General Biology II   4
BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I   4
BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II   4
BIO205 Microbiology   4
CHM121   
CHM130 Fundamental Chemistry   4
CHM138 Chemistry for Allied Health   5
CHM151 General Chemistry I   5
CHM152 General Chemistry II   5
CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I   4
CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab   1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II   4
CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab   1
ENV105 Environmental Biology   4
ENV110 Environmental Geology   4
ENV121   
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography   4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology   4
GLG100 Concepts in Basic Geology   2
GLG101 Intro to Geology I   4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II   4
GLG110 Environmental Geology   4
GLG116 Geology Verde Valley   2
GLG117 Implications Plate Tectonics   2
GLG118 Evolution of Basin and Range   2
GLG119 Geology of Grand Canyon   2
GLG120 Geology of Northern Arizona   2
GLG121 Volcanoes/Earthquakes N AZ   2
GLG122 Geology of Death Valley   2
GLG123 Geology of Bryce and Zion   2
GLG124 Geology of the Prescott Region   2
PHY100 Intro to Astronomy   4
PHY111 General Physics I   4
PHY112 General Physics II   4
PHY140 The Physical World   4
PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I   5
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II   5
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       2.  Arts and Humanities (6 credits)
Choose from Approved List
 
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Arts & Humanities (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the arts & humanities (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ART200 Art History I   IWR ERG GIH 3
ART201 Art History II   IWR ERG GIH 3
ART202 History Mod/Contemp Art   IWR ERG GIH 3
ART203 History of Photography   IWR ERG GIH 3
ENG211    IWR
ENG212    IWR ERG
ENG216 Major Issues Ancient Lit   IWR 3
ENG217    IWR ERG
ENG219    IWR
ENG230 Introduction to Literature   IWR 3
ENG237    IWR ERG
ENG238    IWR ERG
ENG240    IWR ERG
ENG241    IWR ERG
ENG242    IWR
ENG260    IWR
ENG298    IWR
HUM202 Introduction to Mythology   IWR 3
HUM205 Technology and Human Values   IWR 3
HUM236 American Arts & Ideas   IWR ERG 3
HUM241 Humanities Western World I   IWR ERG 3
HUM242 Humanities West World II   IWR ERG 3
HUM243 History of Film   IWR 3
HUM248 Introduction to Folklore   IWR 3
HUM250 American Cinema   IWR 3
HUM260 Intercultural Perspectives   IWR ERG 3
MUS240 Music Appreciation   IWR 3
MUS245 Music of World Cultures   IWR 3
PHI101 Intro to Philosophy   3
PHI122 Science, Religion & Philosophy   3
PHI210 Environmental Ethics/Phi   IWR 3
PHI245 Intro Eastern Philosophy   IWR 3
REL201 Comparative Religions   IWR 3
REL203 Native Religions of the World   IWR 3
REL273 Introduction to Jewish Studies   IWR ERG 3
THR135 Intro to Theater   3
THR243 History of Film   IWR 3
THR250 American Cinema   IWR 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       3.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
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Behavioral Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152 Personal Health & Wellness   3
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       4.  Social Science (3 credits)
Choose from Approved LIst
 
Show / hide all social science (agec) courses

Social Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science (agec) component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
II.  Communication Requirement (3 credits)
COM100 Intro Human Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 100. Introduction to Human Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1100. Introduction to the essential elements of human communication and behavior, with emphasis on intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public communication, and oral communication skills important to personal and professional settings. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contemporary and historical theories of the dynamics and processes of human communication
2. Perception
3. Use of language
4. Nonverbal messages
5. Conflict management
6. Concepts and theories of listening
7. Interpersonal communication and relationship dynamics
8. Dynamic group communication
9. Intercultural communication
10. Gender communication
11. Basic public speaking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, and understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (6,11)
2. Generate organized and logical speaking that responds to the demands of a specific rhetorical situation. (1,11)
3. Use precision in writing, speaking, and thinking and express awareness of the power and variety of language. (3,6,11)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (4)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication in both interpersonal and group/team situations. (2,7,8)
7. Evaluate communication theories for a variety of cultural contexts. (9)
8. Formulate and deliver effective oral presentations. (11)
9. Design simple, effective messages for a mass communication context (i.e., advertising and public relations). (8,11)
10. Analyze the impact of new communication technologies on human communication. (1)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. 1,500 words of monitored writing and submission of a portfolio

3
OR COM131 Fund Speech Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 131. Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3). Study of the essential elements of oral communication, with major emphasis on public speaking. Includes use of multimedia technologies for presentations. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Communication Discipline
2. Basic Rhetoric
3. Speech Structure
4. Content Development
5. Speech Preparation
6. Speech Anxiety
7. Delivery Techniques and Styles
8. Listening
9. Multicultural Communication
10. Speech Analysis
11. Communication Ethics
12. Audience Analysis.
13. Public Speaking in Group Environments
14. Individual Research Project

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning.(3-8)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment (2,5,7)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes. (5,7,8,10,12)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (10,12)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments.(9,11,12,13,14)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1, 2, 9,10)
7. Analyze audience and topic choice for various speaking situations(5,10,12)
8. Write full-sentence and speaking outlines. (4,5)
9. Identify and manage the causes of speech anxiety. (6)
10. Analyze speeches for use of stylistic and rhetorical devices, and implement the use of such devices in speeches. (2,3,10)
11. Implement strategies for delivery of messages to a variety of audiences, using a variety of visual aids (including multimedia technologies). (7,12,13,14)

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OR COM134 Interpersonal Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 134. Interpersonal Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1110. Build healthy personal and professional relationships. Includes listening, coping with criticism, resolving conflicts, managing emotions, nonverbal communication, and developing empathy for gender and cultural differences. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Perception of self and others
2. Self-awareness and self-acceptance
3. Irrational thinking and debilitative emotions
4. Responding to others: listening and feedback
5. Concrete versus abstract language
6. Communicating without words: nonverbal communication
7. Building positive relationships
8. Self-disclosure in relationships
9. Overcoming barriers and resolving conflicts
10. Assertiveness and aggression
11. Gender and cultural issues in a complex, diverse society

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (4, 9)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment. ( 1,3,4,7,8,10)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes.(5, 9, 10)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (2,5, 6,7)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1,11)
7. Differentiate between the use of concrete and abstract language. (5)
8. Identify skills for building positive relationships. (7,8)
9. Implement strategies for recognizing and managing the cause of conflict in relationships. (9,10)
10. Differentiate between stereotypes and legitimate differences in communication styles, based on gender and cultural background (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Written journal, minimum of 1,500 word entries.

3
OR COM271 Small Group Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 271. Small Group Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 2271. Examination of the principles and processes of group communication as a vehicle for solving problems, reaching decisions and making recommendations. Students will study and practice the theories, behaviors and processes of group communication. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Group communication theory
2. Group and group processes
3. Group concepts
4. Group climate
5. Decision making and problem solving theories and strategies
6. Leadership theories and strategies
7. Technology and teams

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply theories and principles of group communication (1,2,7)
2. Apply and identify group problem solving and decision making strategies (5)
3. Evaluate group processes and behavior (2,4)
4. Apply leadership and group participation skills (3,6)
5. Identify and apply available technologies for virtual meetings (7)

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III.  Major and Elective Studies (22 credits)   1
1 - Select 22 transferable credits from transfer guides or intended major, including second language courses. The student who has decided on a major should consult the list of common lower-division major courses for their chosen major. The student who has selected a four year college of intended transfer should also consult the catalog or website of that college for additional guidance regarding their major and courses. Up-to-date information regarding requirements of various degree programs at Arizona�s universities can be found at www.aztransfer.com. Choose from the following prefixes - or courses where noted - when completing this requirement: ACC, AGE, AGS, AHS 230 (only), AJS (except AJS 291), ANT, ART, ASL, BIO, BSA, CHM, CHP, COM, CRW, CSA, DAN*, DFM, ECE, EDU, ENG, ENV, GEO, GLG, GRN, HIS, HUM, JRN, MAT (except MAT 100 and MAT 122), MUS, NSG (except NSG 114, NSG 124, NSG 130 and NSG 133), NTR, PHE*, PHI, PHY, POS, PSY, REC*, REL, SOC, SPA, STU, THR, VGD, and WEB. *DAN, PHE and REC are limited to 4 activity-based credit hours each.

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.