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Program Contacts

Prescott Advising Prescott Academic Advising (928) 776-2106
Verde Advising Verde Valley Academic Advising (928) 634-6510
Dean Scott Farnsworth (928) 776-2234

Quick Facts


About the Associate of Science

The Associate of Science degree requires completion of 60 credit hours. Although students often have the option of entering a career field upon completion of the Associate of Science degree, this degree plan is primarily designed to provide the first two years of coursework to prepare students for transfer into a related upper division baccalaureate degree program. The Associate of Science degree is the appropriate degree plan for students who major in fields with heavy requirements in mathematics and science. The Associate of Science degree is intended for students specializing in engineering, engineering technology, industrial technology, agriculture, health professions, mathematics, or science.

Thirty-five hours of coursework are concentrated in general education. At Yavapai College the Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC-S) is embedded in the Associate of Science degree. Arizona General Education (AGEC) special requirements incorporate additional university requirements in Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR), Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) awareness, and Global/International and Historical (GIH) awareness areas. Upon completion of all 35 credit hours (including the special requirements) of the AGEC with a grade of “C” of higher, the student will receive recognition of completion on the transcript and guaranteed transferability of the AGEC upon admission to one of the state universities in Arizona.

The core curriculum consists of three parts: (A) Foundation Studies include critical literacy, precise writing, qualitative thinking, and the process of analysis and synthesis that underlie logical reasoning; (B) Area Studies link foundation skills in thinking and communicating and the core emphasis on conceptual frameworks to the content orientation of academic disciplines; (C) Other Requirements.

Three credit hours of communications coursework are required for this degree. Twenty-two credit hours of coursework in this degree are in major and elective studies. This aspect of the degree affords the student an opportunity to begin work on a major area of study.

Students preparing to transfer to an upper-division baccalaureate degree program should contact an advisor in the major field of study at the transfer institution in addition to meeting regularly with a faculty advisor and/or counselor at Yavapai College. Regular advisement is important to build an educational plan and ensure transferability of general education, elective, and major courses. Students intending to transfer to one of the Arizona public universities can obtain specific information on transferability of courses from the Course Equivalency Guide and curriculum transfer guides available from academic advisors. Transfer guides are also available from each university's web site.

Note:  

*AGEC Special Awareness Requirements Students must complete a course from each of the following areas:

  • Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry (IWR) 
  • ​Ethnic/Race/Gender (ERG) awareness
  • Global/International or Historical (GIH) awareness
 

General Educational Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education (35 credits)
  A.  Foundation Studies (9 credits)
       1.  College Composition (6 credits)
ENG101 College Composition I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 101. College Composition I (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1101. Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading and critical thinking. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the English skills assessment; or a grade of "C" or better in ENG 100. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Critical Reading
11. Critical Thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2, 11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3, 11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 11). (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6, 7) (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1, 3, 5, 7, 11) (WC 3)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10, 11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7, 8, 10, 11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,4,7,11) (WC 2)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
OR ENG103 College Composition I Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 103. College Composition I Honors (3). Composing expository and argumentative essays for specific audiences. Emphasis on the processes of writing, reading, and critical thinking. Advanced English 101 content and learning activities. Introduction to research and documentation. Prerequisite: Placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10.Critical reading
11.Critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2,11) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3,11)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1,2,4,6,11) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5,7,11)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4,6,7). (WC 3)
7. Incorporate purposeful, varied and appropriate vocabulary. (1,3,5,7,11)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2,8,10,11) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7,9,10) (WC 3)
10. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (7,8,10,11)
11. Use persuasive reasoning. (2,3,7,11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 4500 words of student writing.

3
ENG102 College Composition II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 102. College Composition II (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoENG 1102. Extensive critical reading and writing about texts. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG103. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and documentation
9. Surface features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of evaluated student writing.

3
OR ENG104 College Composition II Honors

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENG 104. College Composition II Honors (3). Extensive critical reading and writing about texts, including literature. Emphasis on fluency in critical writing. Advanced English 102 content and learning activities. Includes research skills and writing a critical, documented essay. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 101 and placement by English skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Focus
2. Development strategies
3. Voice
4. Organization
5. Details
6. Sentence Structure
7. Multiple meanings and perspectives in language
8. Sources and Documentation
9. Surface Features
10. Text interpretation and analysis
11. Critical Reading

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Write focus statements. (1)
2. Apply reasoned development strategies. (2) (WC 2)
3. Select and apply voice. (3)
4. Use organizational strategies. (1, 2, 4, 6, 10) (WC 2)
5. Use and select details. (5, 7, 10)
6. Apply sentence structure strategies. (4, 6) (WC 3)
7. Identify and evaluate multiple meanings and perspectives in language. (7, 10)
8. Locate, evaluate, integrate, and document information. (2, 8, 10) (WC 1)
9. Apply conventions of standard written English. (7, 9, 10) (WC 3)
10. Interpret and analyze texts. (7, 8, 10)
11. Evaluate and analyze professional and student writing. (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. A minimum of 5000 words of student writing.

3
       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)
MAT220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 220. Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2220. Introduction to calculus of single variable functions. Includes limits, the fundamental principles of differentiation and integration, techniques for finding derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications of derivatives. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183; or equivalent or satisfactory score on mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions and their applications
2. Limits and continuity
3. Definition and visualization of a derivative
4. The laws of differentiation
5. Applications of the derivative
6. Definition and visualization of a integral
7. The fundamental theorem of calculus
8. Basic integration techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate, graph and define functions. (1) (QL 3)
2. Evaluate limits. (2) (QL 1)
3. Define continuity and determine whether a function is or is not continuous. (2) (QL 1)
4. Define derivative and evaluate derivatives using the definition. (3) (QL 1)
5. Evaluate derivatives using the rules of differentiation. (4) (QL 1)
6. Describe and define the geometric concept of a derivative. (3) (QL 1,3)
7. Use differentiation techniques to sketch curves. (4,5) (QL 1,3)
8. Use differentiation to solve applied problems. (4,5) (QL 2,4)
9. Define the definite integral and integration. (6,7) (QL 1)
10. Use basic integration techniques to evaluate integrals. (8) (QL 1)

5
OR MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
OR MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
OR MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
  B.  Area Studies (20 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (8 credits)
       Complete one of the following two-course sequences appropriate to your major:
BIO181 General Biology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 181. General Biology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1181. Biological principles emphasizing structure and function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of biological systems. Secondary school chemistry strongly recommended. Primarily for biology majors and preprofessional students in health-related fields. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific Method
2. Basic chemistry and biological macromolecules
3. Organization of cells
4. Energy and Enzymes
5. Photosynthesis
6. Cellular respiration
7. Cell division
8. Genetics
9. Gene expression and regulation
10. Gene technology
11. Data collection and analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the scientific method in problem solving (1) (PBS 1,3)
2. Describe the basic chemistry and chemical interactions of life (2)
3. Describe the structure and function of the four main types of biological macromolecules (2)
4. Identify and describe the structure and function of the parts of typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells (3)
5. Describe the properties of enzymes and their relation to cellular metabolism (4)
6. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of photosynthesis (5)
7. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of cellular respiration (6)
8. Describe the biological processes of cell division including the cell cycle, mitosis, and meiosis (7)
9. Solve mendelian and nonmendelian genetics problems (8) (PBS 2)
10. Describe the fundamental processes of gene expression and control of gene expression (9)
11. Describe basic genetic engineering techniques and tools including recombinant DNA techniques and Polymerase Chain Reaction (10)
12. Conduct experiments, observe biological phenomena, and record information in a laboratory notebook (11)

4
AND BIO182 General Biology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 182. General Biology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1182. Principles of plant and animal structure, function, and diversity; evolution, and ecology of populations and communities emphasizing biotic interactions. Primarily designed for biology and pre-professional majors. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Bacteria, fungi, and virus
2. Plant anatomy and physiology
3. Plant diversity
4. Animal anatomy and physiology
5. Animal diversity
6. Evolution and natural selection
7. Classification and phylogeny
8. Ecological principles
9. Population ecology
10. Community ecology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the classification and characteristics of bacteria, fungi and virus.
2. Describe plant diversity in respect to structure, function, and classification.
3. Describe animal diversity in respect to structure, function, and classification.
4. Describe and analyze processes involved in evolution and natural selection. (PBS 1-3)
5. Describe the characteristics of each kingdom in biological classification.
6. Describe and demonstrate phylogenetic relationships of plants and animals. (PBS 1)
7. Describe and demonstrate the principles of ecology.
8. Describe and demonstrate the principles of population ecology.
9. Describe and demonstrate the principles of community ecology.

4
CHM151 General Chemistry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 151. General Chemistry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1151. Exploration of chemical measurement, classification, stoichiometry, and structure/function relationships for inorganic, organic and biological materials. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students. Prerequisite: MAT 122 or higher or two years of high school algebra. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific method and measurement
a. Observation, description, and experiment
b. The metric system
c. Problem solving using dimensional analysis
2. Structure, properties, and classification of matter
a. Atomic structure and electron configurations
b. Elements, molecules, ions, and compounds,
c. Chemical formulas, equations, nomenclature
3. Physical behavior of matter
a. Gases, liquids and solids
b. Solutions and electrolytes
c. Concentration, and dilution
4. Stoichiometry and reactions
a. The mole concept
b. Writing and balancing chemical equations
c. Limiting reagent and reaction yield
5. Chemical reactions and behavior
a. Acids and bases, oxidation and reduction
6. Chemical bonding
a. Ionic vs. Covalent compounds
b. Lewis Structures
c. VSEPR and Valance Bond Theory
d. Molecular structure and properties
7. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry
a. Hydrocarbons, structural formulas, functional groups
8. Laboratory practice
a. Conventional and Instrumental analysis, experimental design, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.

LEARNING OUTCOMES::
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems using the concepts central to chemistry.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon.
b. Write equations that describe chemical change using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (8) (PBS 2)
a. Use standard glassware and instruments to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (8) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

5
AND CHM152 General Chemistry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 152. General Chemistry II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1152. Advanced topics in general chemistry including chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base, and electrochemistry. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students, Prerequisite: CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Laboratory practice
a. Instrumental analysis, computer assisted data acquisition in a laboratory setting (pH titrations, etc.), experimental design, long term project management, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.
2. Solutions and Colligative Properties of Solutions
3. Chemical Kinetics: Reaction Mechanisms and Reaction Rates
4. Chemical Equilibrium: Equilibrium Constants, Reaction Diagrams, and Le Chatelier's Principle
5. Advanced Equilibrium Principles: Acid-Base behavior, pH and Titration Curves, Buffers and Buffer preparation, solubility products.
6. Chemical Thermodynamics: Enthalpy, Entropy, and Gibb?s Free Energy.
7. Electrochemistry: Balancing Redox Equations, Electrochemical Cells, Connections with Thermodynamics and Equilibrium
8. Nuclear Chemistry: Nuclear power, bombs, waste, radiologic dating, and writing nuclear equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-9) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with kinetic, equilibrium, thermodynamic, and electrochemical principles.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations collected in a traditional laboratory setting.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-9) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.
b. Write equations that represent chemical equilibrium, and mechanisms of reaction using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-9) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1) (PBS 2)
a. Use laboratory glassware and instruments in a traditional laboratory environment to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

5
PHY111 General Physics I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 111. General Physics I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1111. Topics include: time and motion studies, forces on stationary and moving objects, waves and sound, heat and energy. Designed for architecture, forestry, pre-med, pre-vet, pharmacy and education students. Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183. MAT 187 is strongly recommended. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Statics
2. Kinematics
3. Dynamics
4. Conservation of energy and momentum
5. Rotational mechanics
6. Gravitational and astronomical laws
7. Waves, sound, simple harmonic motion
8. Heat and energy.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the kinematics and dynamics of constant velocity motion, constant acceleration motion, projectile motion, uniform circular motion, rotational motion, collisions and explosions, simple harmonic motion, and basic wave phenomena. (1-7) (PBS 1-3)
2. Apply Newton's laws to physical problems. (3-7) (PBS 2-3)
3. Apply conservation laws to physical problems. (4,5) (PBS 2)
4. State the laws of thermodynamics and apply them to basic situations. (8) (PBS 2)
5. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
6. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1)
7. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2, 3)
8. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
9. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 1,2,3)

4
AND PHY112 General Physics II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 112. General Physics II (4) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1112. Electricity, magnetism, light, physical optics, geometric optics, and atomic structure. Designed for pre-med, pre-vet, and pharmacy students. Prerequisite: PHY 111. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Electricity and magnetism
2. Light and optics
3. Atomic transformations
4. Nuclear transformations
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply electric and magnetic forces and fields to basic statics and dynamics problems. (1) (PBS 2)
2. State the relationships between electric potential and electric fields, and apply the relationships to basic electrostatic situations. (1) (PBS 2)
3. Build and analyze basic circuits, and solve basic circuit problems. (1) (PBS 2,3)
4. Build and analyze simple optical systems, and solve basic optical problems. (2) (PBS 2,3)
5. Calculate the energies and wavelengths of spectral lines in atomic spectra. (2,3) (PBS 2)
6. Measure nuclear radiation levels. (4) (PBS 2,3)
7. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-4) (PBS 2,3)
8. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-4) (PBSO 1)
9. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-4) (PBS 2,3)
10. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-4) (PBS 2,3)
11. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-4) (PBS 1-3)

4
PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 150. Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (5) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1121. Principles of mechanics. Kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, equilibrium, fluids, gravitation, and oscillations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 220. One year of high school physics or PHY 111/112 is strongly recommended. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Kinematics and dynamics of individual particles and systems of particles.
2. Newton's laws of motion
3. Linear and rotational motion
4. Kinetic and potential energy
5. Work
6. Collisions
7. Gravitation
8. Equilibrium and statics
9. Fluid statics and dynamics
10. Oscillations
11. Conservation laws: linear momentum, angular momentum, energy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the kinematics and dynamics of constant velocity motion, constant acceleration motion, projectile motion, uniform circular motion, collisions and explosions, rotational motion, equilibrium, orbital motion, and simple harmonic motion. (1-8, 10,11) (PBS 1-3)
2. Analyze the behavior of ideal fluids. (9) (PBS 2)
3. Apply Newton's laws to physical problems. (2,3,7,10) (PBS 2,3)
4. Apply conservation laws to physical problems. (11) (PBS 2)
5. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
6. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-11) (PBS 1)
7. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
8. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
9. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-11) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

5
AND PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 151. Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1131. Waves and sound, electromagnetism, circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell's equations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 230 and PHY 150. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Waves, sound
2. Electric charge and current
3. Electric and magnetic fields in vacuum and in materials
4. Induction
5. DC and AC circuits
6. Displacement current
7. Maxwell's equations
8. Electromagnetic waves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe and analyze basic wave phenomena, including applications to music. (1) (PBS 2)
2. Apply electric and magnetic forces and fields to basic statics and dynamics problems. (2,3) (PBSO 2)
3. Analyze the behaviors of, and relationships between, charged particles, electric fields, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic waves. (3,4,6-8) (PBS 2)
4. Design, construct, and analyze simple electrical circuits. (5) (PBS 2,3)
5. State Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism, and discuss the physical meaning of each. (7) (PBS 2)
6. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
7. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1)
8. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
9. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
10. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

5
       2.  Arts and Humanities (6 credits)
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Arts & Humanities Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the arts & humanities component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ART200 Art History I   IWR ERG GIH 3
ART201 Art History II   IWR ERG GIH 3
ART202 History Mod/Contemp Art   IWR ERG GIH 3
ART203 History of Photography   IWR ERG GIH 3
ENG211 Major Issues Brit Lit I   IWR 3
ENG212 British Lit 1798-Present   IWR ERG 3
ENG216 Major Issues Ancient Lit   IWR 3
ENG217 Major Issues World Lit   IWR ERG 3
ENG219 Major Issues Modern Drama   IWR 3
ENG230 Introduction to Literature   IWR 3
ENG237 Women in Literature   IWR ERG 3
ENG238 Literature of Southwest   IWR ERG 3
ENG240 American Lit to 1865   IWR ERG 3
ENG241 American Lit 1865 to Present   IWR ERG 3
ENG242 Intro to Shakespeare   IWR 3
ENG260 Literature and Film   IWR 3
ENG298 Special Topics in Literature   IWR 3
HUM202 Introduction to Mythology   IWR 3
HUM205 Technology and Human Values   IWR 3
HUM236 American Arts and Ideas II   IWR ERG 3
HUM241 Humanities Western World I   IWR ERG 3
HUM242 Humanities West World II   IWR ERG 3
HUM243 Development of the Film   IWR 3
HUM248 Introduction to Folklore   IWR 3
HUM250 American Cinema   IWR 3
HUM260 Intercultural Perspectives   IWR ERG 3
MUS240 Music Appreciation   IWR 3
MUS245 Music of World Cultures   IWR 3
PHI101 Intro to Philosophy   3
PHI122 Science, Religion & Philosophy   3
PHI245 Intro Eastern Philosophy   IWR 3
REL201 Comparative Religions   IWR 3
REL203 Native Religions of the World   IWR 3
REL273 Introduction to Jewish Studies   IWR ERG 3
THR135 Intro to Theater   3
THR243 Development of the Film   IWR 3
THR250 American Cinema   IWR 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       3.  Behavioral Science (3 credits)
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Behavioral Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ECE210 Infant and Toddler Development   3
ECE234 Child Growth and Development   3
GRN101 Psychology of Aging   3
GRN102 Health and Aging   3
PHE152 Personal Health & Wellness   3
PHE205 Stress Management   3
PSY101 Introductory Psychology   3
PSY132 Cross Cultural Psychology   ERG 3
PSY234 Child Growth and Development   3
PSY238 Psychology of Play   ERG 3
PSY240 Personality Development   3
PSY245 Human Growth and Development   3
PSY250 Social Psychology   3
PSY277 Human Sexuality   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
       4.  Social Science (3 credits)
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Social Science Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science component of this degree.

CourseTitleHours
ANT101 Stones,Bones,Human Origin   3
ANT102 Intro Cultural Anthro   ERG 3
ANT104 Buried Cities/Lost Tribes   3
ANT214 Magic, Witchcaft and Healing   ERG 3
ANT231 Southwestern Archaeology   3
ANT232 Indians of the Southwest   ERG 3
BSA235 Principles Economics-Macro   3
GEO101 World Geography West   GIH 3
GEO102 World Geography East   GIH 3
GEO105 Intro Cultural Geography   ERG GIH 3
HIS260 History Native Am in the U.S.   ERG 3
SOC101 Intro to Sociology   ERG 3
SOC140 Sociology Intimate Relationshp   ERG 3
SOC142 Race and Ethnic Relations   ERG 3
SOC212 Gender and Society   ERG 3
SOC250 Social Problems   ERG 3
IWR = This course meets the requirements of the Intensive Writing/Critical Inquiry awareness area.
ERG = This course meets the requirements of the Ethnic/Race/Gender awareness area.
GIH = This course meets the requirements of the Global/International or Historical awareness area.
  C.  Other Requirements (6-8 credits)
       1.  Select 2 other courses based on your major from the following list:
BIO181 General Biology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 181. General Biology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1181. Biological principles emphasizing structure and function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of biological systems. Secondary school chemistry strongly recommended. Primarily for biology majors and preprofessional students in health-related fields. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific Method
2. Basic chemistry and biological macromolecules
3. Organization of cells
4. Energy and Enzymes
5. Photosynthesis
6. Cellular respiration
7. Cell division
8. Genetics
9. Gene expression and regulation
10. Gene technology
11. Data collection and analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the scientific method in problem solving (1) (PBS 1,3)
2. Describe the basic chemistry and chemical interactions of life (2)
3. Describe the structure and function of the four main types of biological macromolecules (2)
4. Identify and describe the structure and function of the parts of typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells (3)
5. Describe the properties of enzymes and their relation to cellular metabolism (4)
6. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of photosynthesis (5)
7. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of cellular respiration (6)
8. Describe the biological processes of cell division including the cell cycle, mitosis, and meiosis (7)
9. Solve mendelian and nonmendelian genetics problems (8) (PBS 2)
10. Describe the fundamental processes of gene expression and control of gene expression (9)
11. Describe basic genetic engineering techniques and tools including recombinant DNA techniques and Polymerase Chain Reaction (10)
12. Conduct experiments, observe biological phenomena, and record information in a laboratory notebook (11)

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BIO182 General Biology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 182. General Biology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1182. Principles of plant and animal structure, function, and diversity; evolution, and ecology of populations and communities emphasizing biotic interactions. Primarily designed for biology and pre-professional majors. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Bacteria, fungi, and virus
2. Plant anatomy and physiology
3. Plant diversity
4. Animal anatomy and physiology
5. Animal diversity
6. Evolution and natural selection
7. Classification and phylogeny
8. Ecological principles
9. Population ecology
10. Community ecology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the classification and characteristics of bacteria, fungi and virus.
2. Describe plant diversity in respect to structure, function, and classification.
3. Describe animal diversity in respect to structure, function, and classification.
4. Describe and analyze processes involved in evolution and natural selection. (PBS 1-3)
5. Describe the characteristics of each kingdom in biological classification.
6. Describe and demonstrate phylogenetic relationships of plants and animals. (PBS 1)
7. Describe and demonstrate the principles of ecology.
8. Describe and demonstrate the principles of population ecology.
9. Describe and demonstrate the principles of community ecology.

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BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 201. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2201. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 181. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomical terms and homeostasis
2. Cytological and histological anatomy and functions
3. Integumentary system
4. Anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system
5. Axial and appendicular skeleton, joints
6. Anatomy and physiology of the muscular system
7. Gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles
8. Muscle contraction
9. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
10. The central and peripheral nervous systems
11. The automatic nervous system
12. The senses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the parts of a typical cell and describe their function and structure. (1, 2)
2. Identify and describe the four basic tissue types, their anatomy and functions. (1, 2)
3. Describe the anatomy and functions of the integumentary system. (1, 3)
4. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system. (1, 4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy of joints, axial and appendicular skeletal systems. (1, 5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the muscular system. (1, 6)
7. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles. (1, 7)
8. Describe the biological processes involved in muscle contraction. (1, 8) (PBS 1)
9. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. (1, 9)
10. Describe and identify brain and spinal cord anatomy and reflexes. (1, 10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in the nerve impulse. (1, 10, 11)
12. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology autonomic nervous system. (1, 10, 11)
13. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology of the senses. (1, 12) (PBS 2,3)
14. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the human body. (3-12)
15. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-12)
16. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-12) (PBS 2)
17. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (2-12)
18. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-12)

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BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 202. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2202. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include reproductive, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. Prerequisite: BIO 201. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands
2. Hormonal actions
3. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system
4. Anatomy and physiology of blood
5. Anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system
6. Anatomy and physiology of the immune system
7. Fetal membranes and blood circulation
8. Anatomy and physiology of the digestive system
9. Metabolism
10. Anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system
11. Blood pressure and flow dynamics
12. Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
13. Ventilation mechanisms and gas transport
14. Anatomy and physiology of the urinary system
15. Urine formation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands. (1)
2. Describe the biological processes involved in hormonal actions. (2)
3. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system. (3)
4. Describe the anatomy and functions of blood. (4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system. (5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the immune system. (6)
7. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of fetal membranes and circulation. (7)
8. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system. (8)
9. Describe the biological processes involved in metabolism. (9)
10. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system. (10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in blood pressure dynamics. (11)
12. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. (12)
13. Describe and identify ventilation mechanisms. (13)
14. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the urinary system. (14)
15. Describe the biological processes involved urine formation. (15)
16. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the body. (1-15) (PBS 1)
17. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-15)
18. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2)
19. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2,3)
20. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-15)

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BIO205 Microbiology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 205. Microbiology (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2205. Introduction to microorganisms and viruses of medical importance. Chemical and physical methods of microbial control; bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and viral drug therapy; the immune system response to infection; transmission of human disease; and common clinical presentation of various diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 100 or BIO 181, and CHM 138 (Preferred) or CHM 130 or CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Microbial anatomy
2. Bacterial nutrition, metabolism, and physiology
3. Bacterial genetics
4. Physical and chemical control of microorganisms
5. Anti-microbial therapy
6. Basic principles of epidemiology
7. Humoral and Cellular immunity
8. Bacteria of medical importance
9. Viruses of medical importance
10. Fungi and protozoa of medical importance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and describe the principal physical features of bacterial, fungal, and protozoal cells. (1) (PBS 1)
2. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to isolate, cultivate, and identify bacteria. Prepare a written summary of the identification. (2) (PBS 2,3)
3. Describe the method of inheritance in haploid microorganisms, with emphasis on mutation rate. (3) (PBS 2)
4. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to prepare sterile microbiological media and demonstrate the effects of chemical agents on bacterial growth. (4) (PBS 2,3)
5. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to demonstrate the effects of antibiotics on medically important bacteria. (5)
6. Describe the various methods of transmission of human disease from other humans, the environment, and animal vectors.(6)
7. Describe the relationship between the human immune system and resistance to disease. (7)
8. Describe the important clinical features of human diseases due to bacteria. (8) (PBS 1)
9. Describe the principal structural and genetic features of medically important viruses, and their usual clinical presentation. (9) (PBS 1)
10. Describe the important clinical features of human diseases due to fungi and protozoa. (10)

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CHM151 General Chemistry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 151. General Chemistry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1151. Exploration of chemical measurement, classification, stoichiometry, and structure/function relationships for inorganic, organic and biological materials. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students. Prerequisite: MAT 122 or higher or two years of high school algebra. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific method and measurement
a. Observation, description, and experiment
b. The metric system
c. Problem solving using dimensional analysis
2. Structure, properties, and classification of matter
a. Atomic structure and electron configurations
b. Elements, molecules, ions, and compounds,
c. Chemical formulas, equations, nomenclature
3. Physical behavior of matter
a. Gases, liquids and solids
b. Solutions and electrolytes
c. Concentration, and dilution
4. Stoichiometry and reactions
a. The mole concept
b. Writing and balancing chemical equations
c. Limiting reagent and reaction yield
5. Chemical reactions and behavior
a. Acids and bases, oxidation and reduction
6. Chemical bonding
a. Ionic vs. Covalent compounds
b. Lewis Structures
c. VSEPR and Valance Bond Theory
d. Molecular structure and properties
7. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry
a. Hydrocarbons, structural formulas, functional groups
8. Laboratory practice
a. Conventional and Instrumental analysis, experimental design, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.

LEARNING OUTCOMES::
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems using the concepts central to chemistry.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon.
b. Write equations that describe chemical change using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (8) (PBS 2)
a. Use standard glassware and instruments to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (8) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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CHM152 General Chemistry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 152. General Chemistry II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1152. Advanced topics in general chemistry including chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base, and electrochemistry. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students, Prerequisite: CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Laboratory practice
a. Instrumental analysis, computer assisted data acquisition in a laboratory setting (pH titrations, etc.), experimental design, long term project management, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.
2. Solutions and Colligative Properties of Solutions
3. Chemical Kinetics: Reaction Mechanisms and Reaction Rates
4. Chemical Equilibrium: Equilibrium Constants, Reaction Diagrams, and Le Chatelier's Principle
5. Advanced Equilibrium Principles: Acid-Base behavior, pH and Titration Curves, Buffers and Buffer preparation, solubility products.
6. Chemical Thermodynamics: Enthalpy, Entropy, and Gibb?s Free Energy.
7. Electrochemistry: Balancing Redox Equations, Electrochemical Cells, Connections with Thermodynamics and Equilibrium
8. Nuclear Chemistry: Nuclear power, bombs, waste, radiologic dating, and writing nuclear equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-9) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with kinetic, equilibrium, thermodynamic, and electrochemical principles.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations collected in a traditional laboratory setting.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-9) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.
b. Write equations that represent chemical equilibrium, and mechanisms of reaction using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-9) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1) (PBS 2)
a. Use laboratory glassware and instruments in a traditional laboratory environment to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 235. General Organic Chemistry I (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 2235. Chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, stereo-chemistry, and structure. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors, and pre-professional students. Concurrent registration in CHM 235L recommended. Prerequisite: CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Bonding, and Molecular Structure
2. Functional Groups and Infrared Spectroscopy
3. Hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes) structure, properties, reactivity and nomenclature
4. Stereochemistry-Chiral Molecules
5. Organic Reactions and Mechanisms - substitutions, eliminations, additions, oxidations/reductions, and radical reactions.
6. Preparation and reactions of alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides
7. Preparation and reactions of alcohols and ethers
8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with synthetic pathways and mechanisms of reaction.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers.
b. Write mechanistic diagrams that represent the step-by-step progress of organic reactions using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 4)
a. Use spectroscopic analysis to identify specific organic structures.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 5)
a. Write papers and/or short essays on research oriented topics associated the major themes and concepts presented during the term of study.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

4
AND CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 235L. General Organic Chemistry I Lab (1) (Fall). Laboratory techniques and practice with emphasis on separations, purification, synthesis and spectroscopic identification of organic structures. For science majors and pre-professional students. Prerequisite: CHM 235 (may be taken concurrently). Reading Proficiency. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Purification of Organic Molecules: separations, extraction, distillation, chromatography, and recrystallization
2. Synthesis of organic compounds
3. Functional groups and infrared spectroscopy
4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
5. Laboratory notebooks
6. Scientific reports
7. Organic laboratory glassware, equipment, instrumentation and techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-6) (PBS 1,2,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with synthetic pathways and mechanisms of reaction.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomena through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (5, 6) (PBS 1,2,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary (verbal and written) to describe and/or identify chemical phenomena associated with organic laboratory techniques.
b. Write mechanistic diagrams that represent the step-by-step progress of organic reactions using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Document the ongoing and final efforts associated with laboratory projects.
3.Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (3-6) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Use spectroscopic analysis to identify organic structures.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for research in the organic chemistry laboratory. (1-4, 7) (PBS 2)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (5, 6) (PBS 2,3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT MEASURES:
All CHM 235 students will maintain a portfolio of work in the form of a laboratory notebook. The notebook will document all laboratory efforts including any plots of spectroscopic, chromatographic or other comuter generated data. Students will prepare one report in the style of a professional chemistry publication. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

1
CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 236. General Organic Chemistry II (4) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 2236. Advanced topics in organic chemistry including the synthesis and reactions of aromatic and carbonyl compounds. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students. Concurrent registration in CHM 236L recommended. Prerequisite: CHM 235. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Spectroscopic Identification of Organic Compounds
2. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Dienes and Conjugated Molecules.
3. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Aromatic Molecules.
4. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Aldehydes and Ketones.
5. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Carboxylic Acids and Carboxylic Acid Derivatives.
6. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Amines.
7. Electrophilic and Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions
8. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions of Carbonyls
9. Introduction to the properties and reactions of Amino Acids and Proteins
10. Introduction to the properties and reactions of lipids and carbohydrates.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated synthetic pathways and mechanisms of reaction.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with aromatic and carbonyl compounds
b. Write mechanistic diagrams that represent the step-by-step progress of organic reactions using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-10) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-10) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use spectroscopic analysis to identify specific organic structures.
b. Use computer generated graphics and computer modeling programs to illustrate and model the mechanisms and structures associated with organic transformations.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-10) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write papers and/or short essays on research oriented topics associated the major themes and concepts presented during the term of study.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

4
AND CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 236L. General Organic Chemistry II Lab (1) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 2236. Additional techniques in organic chemistry; preparation, separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 236 (may be taken concurrently) and CHM 235L. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Preparation of homophthalic acid
2. The Wittig reaction
3. Synthesis and resolutionary--phenylethylamine
4. Acetoacetic ester and malonic ester synthesis
5. Sandmeyer reaction
6. Beckmann rearrangement; benzylic acid rearrangement
7. Carbenes
8. Crossed aldo condensation
9. Individual project

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Demonstrate laboratory techniques including steam and vacuum distillation, thin layer chromatography, vapor phase chromatography, photochemical reaction techniques.
2. Demonstrate ability to complete multi-step synthesis.
3. Demonstrate ability to resolve enantiomers.
4. Demonstrate ability to plan, design and complete and individual project in either synthesis a natural product and purification.

1
GEO103 Intro Physical Geography

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GEO 103. Introduction to Physical Geography (4). A geographic introduction to the physical processes and landforms of the earth. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Physical geography tools and terminology
2. Earth's origins and energy systems
3. Atmospheric systems and weather
4. Climates and biomes
5. Earth history and geomorphology of landforms
6. Plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanism
7. Fluvial, marine, glacial and Aeolian landform processes
8. Human-environment interactions and environmental change

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Employ tools of a geographer to test physical geography concepts. (1-8) (PBS 1)
2. Diagram earth's energy and atmospheric systems, and summarize ocean-atmosphere interactions. (2,3)
3. Relate atmospheric processes, temperature patterns and moisture to weather and atmospheric disturbances. (2-4)
4. Classify climate zones and biomes and discuss climate anomalies. (4,8)
5. Use scientific theories to investigate earth's history, structure and surface landforms. (5-7) (PBS 2)
6. Describe the impact of fluvial, Aeolian, marine and glacial processes on landforms. (5,7)
7. Synthesize geographic theories and recent research on human-environment interactions. (1,3,4,6,8) (PBS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

4
GEO212 Intro to Meteorology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GEO 212. Introduction to Meteorology (4). Physical and chemical conditions that regulate global weather phenomena. Includes structure of the atmosphere, temperature, humidity, air pressure and winds, the development of weather systems, tornadoes and hurricanes, and the parameters that affect local and global climate. Laboratory includes image interpretation, field observation and prediction. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Origin of the atmosphere, earth/sun relations and energy systems including the greenhouse effect
2. Atmospheric pressure, air pollution and local and regional wind patterns
3. Hydrologic cycle including humidity and stability of air masses and air-sea interactions
4. Clouds, precipitation, frontal systems and severe weather
5. Tropical and midlatitude systems including wave cyclones, tropical cyclones and tornadoes
6. Atmospheric circulation patterns & oscillations including monsoonal winds, El Nino & global circulation models
7. Global climate patterns, climate change and global warming
8. Meteorological methods and tools for weather monitoring, analysis and forecasting including remote sensing, observations and weather mapping

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the origin and structure of the earth and its atmosphere. (1, 7) (PBS 1)
2. Use scientific reasoning to explain the relationship between the earth and sun and how solar and terrestrial radiation affects temperature, air pressure and wind patterns. (1, 2, 7, 8)
3. Explain the role of heat, moisture and winds in generating clouds, precipitation and severe weather. (2-6, 8)
4. Model major atmospheric circulation systems and oscillations. (1-8)
5. Describe climatic regions and assess climate change predictions. (1-8)
6. Interpret meteorological data to predict weather conditions. (1-8)(PBS 2)

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GLG101 Intro to Geology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GLG 101. Introduction to Geology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoGLG 1101. Geologic principles emphasizing the structure and composition of the earth, internal and external earth processes and plate tectonics. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The scientific method
2. Elemental composition of crust
3. Physical properties of minerals
4. Mineral keys and identification of common minerals
5. The rock cycle
6. Igneous rocks and igneous processes.
7. Weathering
8. Sedimentary rocks and sedimentary processes
9. Metamorphic rocks and metamorphic processes
10. Plate tectonics:
a. development of theory
b. plate boundaries
c. implications for local/regional landscape development
d. critical analysis of this theory in its historical context
11. Seismicity
12. Geologic structures and their development: folds and faults
13. Geologic time, including fundamental principles of historical geology
14. Maps: topographic and geologic
15. Critical analysis, synthesis, and expression of geologic data in a precise manner

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1.Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-13) (PBS 1)
a. Describe and utilize the scientific method. (PBS 1)
b. Identify rocks and minerals and rock-forming processes.
c. Describe fundamental geologic principles
d. Define common geologic terms.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (5-12)
a. Recognize plate tectonics as the unifying theory for earth science.
b. Describe the theory of plate tectonics, its historical development, and plate boundary interactions and their consequences. (PBS 3)
c. Predict outcomes of tectonic interactions.
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data (1-15) (PBS 2)
a. Identify, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate data associated with the discipline of physical geology.
b. Draw conclusions from geologic data presented on graphs or charts regarding earth?s interior, minerals, rocks, plate tectonics, seismicity, geologic time and geologic structures. (PBS 2,3)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research (3-5 and 14)
a. Perform laboratory skills used to identify the physical properties of minerals and rocks.
b. Use a rock/mineral key.
c. Use topographic and geologic maps.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing (15)

4
GLG102 Intro to Geology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GLG 102. Introduction to Geology II (4) (Spring). Earth's origin and history, including plate tectonics and the consequent movement and distribution of lands and seas through time; basic concepts of age-dating, stratigraphy, and the study of fossils; the geologic time scale and development of life on earth. Prerequisite: GLG 100 or GLG 101. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sedimentary rocks
2. Stratigraphy and sedimentation
3. Plate tectonics: plate boundaries; plate motions through time; implications for regional/global landscape development through time
4. Relative and absolute dating
5. Geologic time and the development of the geologic time scale
6. Evolution
7. Fossil organisms, including identifications, classification, and basic morphology
8. Geologic eras, periods, and epochs, particularly the details of North American continental development
9. Development of life from its beginnings to the present
10. Maps: geologic, paleogeographic, lithofacies, paleotectonic, and isopach

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-3, 6, 7, 9) (PBS 1)
a. Recognize sedimentary rocks.
b. Describe the development of life forms known from rocks, through time.
c. Describe the effects of plate movements on the global landscape.
d. Identify basic fossils.
e. Identify life forms through time.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (2-4, 6)
a. Describe and utilize the principles of stratigraphy and sedimentation.
b. Describe plate tectonics as the unifying theory for earth science.
c. Identify and describe the principles of relative and absolute age-dating methods.
d. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate and explain the major evidence for evolution and some of its potential consequences. (PBS 3)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data (3-8) (PBS 2)
a. Identify, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate data associated with the discipline of historical geology. (PBS 2)
b. Draw conclusions from geologic data presented on graphs or charts regarding sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, plate tectonics, age dating, geologic time, evolution and fossils. (PBS 2,3)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research (7, 10)
a. Use maps: geologic, paleogeographic, lithofacies, paleotectonic, and isopach.
b. Identify basic fossils
5. Record the results of investigation through writing (1-10)

4
MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

5
MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

4
MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

3
PHY141 Unavailable
The course description is not currently available for this course.
PHY142 Unavailable
The course description is not currently available for this course.
PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 150. Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (5) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1121. Principles of mechanics. Kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, equilibrium, fluids, gravitation, and oscillations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 220. One year of high school physics or PHY 111/112 is strongly recommended. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Kinematics and dynamics of individual particles and systems of particles.
2. Newton's laws of motion
3. Linear and rotational motion
4. Kinetic and potential energy
5. Work
6. Collisions
7. Gravitation
8. Equilibrium and statics
9. Fluid statics and dynamics
10. Oscillations
11. Conservation laws: linear momentum, angular momentum, energy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the kinematics and dynamics of constant velocity motion, constant acceleration motion, projectile motion, uniform circular motion, collisions and explosions, rotational motion, equilibrium, orbital motion, and simple harmonic motion. (1-8, 10,11) (PBS 1-3)
2. Analyze the behavior of ideal fluids. (9) (PBS 2)
3. Apply Newton's laws to physical problems. (2,3,7,10) (PBS 2,3)
4. Apply conservation laws to physical problems. (11) (PBS 2)
5. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
6. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-11) (PBS 1)
7. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
8. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
9. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-11) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

5
PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 151. Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1131. Waves and sound, electromagnetism, circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell's equations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 230 and PHY 150. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Waves, sound
2. Electric charge and current
3. Electric and magnetic fields in vacuum and in materials
4. Induction
5. DC and AC circuits
6. Displacement current
7. Maxwell's equations
8. Electromagnetic waves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe and analyze basic wave phenomena, including applications to music. (1) (PBS 2)
2. Apply electric and magnetic forces and fields to basic statics and dynamics problems. (2,3) (PBSO 2)
3. Analyze the behaviors of, and relationships between, charged particles, electric fields, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic waves. (3,4,6-8) (PBS 2)
4. Design, construct, and analyze simple electrical circuits. (5) (PBS 2,3)
5. State Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism, and discuss the physical meaning of each. (7) (PBS 2)
6. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
7. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1)
8. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
9. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
10. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

5
II.  Communications Requirement (3 credits)
COM100 Intro Human Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 100. Introduction to Human Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1100. Introduction to the essential elements of human communication and behavior, with emphasis on intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public communication, and oral communication skills important to personal and professional settings. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Contemporary and historical theories of the dynamics and processes of human communication
2. Perception
3. Use of language
4. Nonverbal messages
5. Conflict management
6. Concepts and theories of listening
7. Interpersonal communication and relationship dynamics
8. Dynamic group communication
9. Intercultural communication
10. Gender communication
11. Basic public speaking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, and understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (6,11)
2. Generate organized and logical speaking that responds to the demands of a specific rhetorical situation. (1,11)
3. Use precision in writing, speaking, and thinking and express awareness of the power and variety of language. (3,6,11)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (4)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication in both interpersonal and group/team situations. (2,7,8)
7. Evaluate communication theories for a variety of cultural contexts. (9)
8. Formulate and deliver effective oral presentations. (11)
9. Design simple, effective messages for a mass communication context (i.e., advertising and public relations). (8,11)
10. Analyze the impact of new communication technologies on human communication. (1)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. 1,500 words of monitored writing and submission of a portfolio

3
OR COM131 Fund Speech Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 131. Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3). Study of the essential elements of oral communication, with major emphasis on public speaking. Includes use of multimedia technologies for presentations. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Communication Discipline
2. Basic Rhetoric
3. Speech Structure
4. Content Development
5. Speech Preparation
6. Speech Anxiety
7. Delivery Techniques and Styles
8. Listening
9. Multicultural Communication
10. Speech Analysis
11. Communication Ethics
12. Audience Analysis.
13. Public Speaking in Group Environments
14. Individual Research Project

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning.(3-8)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment (2,5,7)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes. (5,7,8,10,12)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (10,12)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments.(9,11,12,13,14)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1, 2, 9,10)
7. Analyze audience and topic choice for various speaking situations(5,10,12)
8. Write full-sentence and speaking outlines. (4,5)
9. Identify and manage the causes of speech anxiety. (6)
10. Analyze speeches for use of stylistic and rhetorical devices, and implement the use of such devices in speeches. (2,3,10)
11. Implement strategies for delivery of messages to a variety of audiences, using a variety of visual aids (including multimedia technologies). (7,12,13,14)

3
OR COM134 Interpersonal Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 134. Interpersonal Communication (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCOM 1110. Build healthy personal and professional relationships. Includes listening, coping with criticism, resolving conflicts, managing emotions, nonverbal communication, and developing empathy for gender and cultural differences. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Perception of self and others
2. Self-awareness and self-acceptance
3. Irrational thinking and debilitative emotions
4. Responding to others: listening and feedback
5. Concrete versus abstract language
6. Communicating without words: nonverbal communication
7. Building positive relationships
8. Self-disclosure in relationships
9. Overcoming barriers and resolving conflicts
10. Assertiveness and aggression
11. Gender and cultural issues in a complex, diverse society

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use listening skills and oral presentations as modes of discovery, reflection, understanding and sustained disciplined reasoning. (4, 9)
2. Generate organized, logical communication appropriate to the needs of a specific communication environment. ( 1,3,4,7,8,10)
3. Use precise writing, speaking and listening for a variety of audiences and purposes.(5, 9, 10)
4. Identify both the conscious and unconscious use of written, verbal and nonverbal communication. (2,5, 6,7)
5. Identify and interpret discourse in specific communication environments. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 11)
6. Express awareness of multiple meanings and perspectives of communication.(1,11)
7. Differentiate between the use of concrete and abstract language. (5)
8. Identify skills for building positive relationships. (7,8)
9. Implement strategies for recognizing and managing the cause of conflict in relationships. (9,10)
10. Differentiate between stereotypes and legitimate differences in communication styles, based on gender and cultural background (11)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Written journal, minimum of 1,500 word entries.

3
OR COM271 Small Group Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
COM 271. Small Group Communication (3). Examination of the principles and processes of group communication as a vehicle for solving problems, reaching decisions and making recommendations. Students will study and practice the theories, behaviors and processes of group communication. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Group communication theory
2. Group and group processes
3. Group concepts
4. Group climate
5. Decision making and problem solving theories and strategies
6. Leadership theories and strategies
7. Technology and teams

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply theories and principles of group communication (1,2,7)
2. Apply and identify group problem solving and decision making strategies (5)
3. Evaluate group processes and behavior (2,4)
4. Apply leadership and group participation skills (3,6)
5. Identify and apply available technologies for virtual meetings (7)

3
III.  Major and Elective Studies - Select 22 credits from the following list:
AGS103 Plant Biology  1

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AGS 103. Plant Biology (4). An introduction to the growth, development, reproduction, and structure of vascular plants. Fundamental activities of plants including photosynthesis and respiration. Emphasis on agricultural and horticultural crops of Arizona. This course is cross-listed with BIO 103. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Classification of plants
2. Cell structures of plants
3. Cellular activity of plants
4. Chemical activity of plants
5. Mitosis and Meiosis
6. Plant tissues
7. Vegetative components
8. Plant growth improvement
9. Plant propagation
10. Plant growth environments
11. Economic and ecological importance
12. The scientific method

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (2-5, 7, 8, 10, 12) (PBS 3)
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (2-5, 7, 8, 10, 12)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (12) (PBS 1)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (9, 12)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (3, 4, 10, 12) (PBS 2)
6. Discuss the role of plants in the living world. (10)
7. Classify and name plants (1)
8. Compare monocots and dicots. (1, 7, 9)
9. Describe the plant cell structure. (2)
10. Describe cellular activity during meiosis. (3)
11. Explain the process and implications of mitosis and meiosis. (5)
12. Differentiate between various plant tissues. (6)
13. Identify the components of roots, stems, flowers, and leaves. (7)
14. Describe the origin and domestication of cultivated plants. (8)
15. Identify basic concepts in plant improvement. (8)
16. Distinguish between effective and ineffective plant propagation methods for specific plants. (9)
17. Summarize vegetative and reproductive growth and development principles. (7, 10, 12)
18. Identify the properties of photosynthesis, respiration, and translocation in vascular plants. (4)
19. Identify the physical and chemical properties of soil and soil water. (10)
20. Discuss the climactic factors affecting plant growth. (10)
21. Identify major economic crops in Arizona. (11)

4
OR BIO103 Plant Biology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 103. Plant Biology (4). Introduction to the growth, development, reproduction, and structure of vascular plants. Fundamental activities of plants including photosynthesis and respiration. Emphasis on agricultural and horticultural crops of Arizona. This course is cross-listed with AGS 103. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Classification of plants
2. Cell structures of plants
3. Cellular activity of plants
4. Chemical activity of plants
5. Mitosis and Meiosis
6. Plant tissues
7. Vegetative components
8. Plant growth improvement
9. Plant propagation
10. Plant growth environments
11. Economic and ecological importance
12. The scientific method

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12) (PBS 3)
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12) (PBS 1)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (12) (PBS 2)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (9, 12) (PBS 2)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (3, 4, 10, 12) (PBS 2)
6. Discuss the role of plants in the living world. (10)
7. Classify and name plants (1)
8. Compare monocots and dicots. (1, 7, 9)
9. Describe the plant cell structure. (2)
10. Describe cellular activity during meiosis. (3)
11. Explain the process and implications of mitosis and meiosis. (5)
12. Differentiate between various plant tissues. (6)
13. Identify the components of roots, stems, flowers, and leaves. (7)
14. Describe the origin and domestication of cultivated plants. (8)
15. Identify basic concepts in plant improvement. (8) (PBS 2)
16. Distinguish between effective and ineffective plant propagation methods for specific plants. (9)
17. Summarize vegetative and reproductive growth and development principles. (7, 10, 12)
18. Identify the properties of photosynthesis, respiration, and translocation in vascular plants. (4)
19. Identify the physical and chemical properties of soil and soil water. (10)
20. Discuss the climactic factors affecting plant growth. (10)
21. Identify major economic crops in Arizona. (11)

4
BIO105 Environmental Biology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 105. Environmental Biology (4). Introduction to ecological systems, natural resources, and applications to environmental issues. Includes population, community, and ecosystem analysis. Emphasis on field, laboratory, and writing activities. This course is cross-listed with ENV 105. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Interactions of individual organisms with the physical environment
2. Interactions of individuals and populations with the biological environment
3. Energy flow through communities and ecosystems
4. Factors affecting global distribution of climate
5. Characteristics of the major biomes
6. Interaction between humans and the environment
7. Field data collection techniques
8. Recording data and observations
9. Interpretation of data
10. Elementary statistics
11. Biogeochemical cycles
12. Population variation, adaptations, and natural selection
13. Island biogeography and conservation applications

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the adaptations of organisms to the physical environment. (1)
2. Describe intra and inter specific competition, and other types of interactions between individuals and populations. (2)
3. Describe and graph exponential and logistic population growth. (2) (PBS 1,2)
4. Describe the flow of energy through ecosystems emphasizing trophic levels and food webs. (3)
5. Describe the processes generating climatic zones on the Earth. (4)
6. Correlate biomes with climate patterns (4,5)
7. List the physical and biotic characteristics of the major biomes (5)
8. Describe interactions between hunter-gatherer, pastoral, agrarian, and industrial societies and the environment. (6)
9. Collect quantifiable data using various field methods. (7,8) (PBS 2)
10. Analyze data using graphical and statistical methods. (9,10) (PBS 2,3)
11. Describe the major biogeochemical cycles including water, carbon, and nitrogen. (11)
12. Describe the basic mechanisms and conditions affecting populations with respect to evolution and natural selection. (12) (PBS 1-3)
13. Describe the influence of area, distance, and other factors in predicting species diversity. (13)(PBS 2)

4
OR ENV105 Environmental Biology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENV 105. Environmental Biology (4). Introduction to ecological systems, natural resources, and applications to environmental issues. Includes population, community, and ecosystem analysis. Emphasis on field, laboratory, and writing activities. This course is cross-listed with BIO 105. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Interactions of individual organisms with the physical environment
2. Interactions of individuals and populations with the biological environment
3. Energy flow through communities and ecosystems
4. Factors affecting global distribution of climate
5. Characteristics of the major biomes
6. Interaction between humans and the environment
7. Field data collection techniques
8. Recording data and observations
9. Interpretation of data
10. Elementary statistics
11. Biogeochemical cycles
12. Population variation, adaptations, and natural selection
13. Island biogeography and conservation applications

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the adaptations of organisms to the physical environment. (1) (PBS 1)
2. Describe intra and inter specific competition, and other types of interactions between individuals and populations. (2)
3. Describe and graph exponential and logistic population growth. (2) (PBS 2,3)
4. Describe the flow of energy through ecosystems emphasizing trophic levels and food webs. (3)
5. Describe the processes generating climatic zones on the Earth. (4)
6. Correlate biomes with climate patterns (4,5)
7. List the physical and biotic characteristics of the major biomes (5)
8. Describe interactions between hunter-gatherer, pastoral, agrarian, and industrial societies and the environment. (6)
9. Collect quantifiable data using various field methods. (7,8) (PBS 1,2)
10. Analyze data using graphical and statistical methods. (9,10) (PBS 2,3)
11. Describe the major biogeochemical cycles including water, carbon, and nitrogen. (11)
12. Describe the basic mechanisms and conditions affecting populations with respect to evolution and natural selection. (12)
13. Describe the influence of area, distance, and other factors in predicting species diversity. (13)

4
BIO181 General Biology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 181. General Biology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1181. Biological principles emphasizing structure and function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of biological systems. Secondary school chemistry strongly recommended. Primarily for biology majors and preprofessional students in health-related fields. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific Method
2. Basic chemistry and biological macromolecules
3. Organization of cells
4. Energy and Enzymes
5. Photosynthesis
6. Cellular respiration
7. Cell division
8. Genetics
9. Gene expression and regulation
10. Gene technology
11. Data collection and analysis

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply the scientific method in problem solving (1) (PBS 1,3)
2. Describe the basic chemistry and chemical interactions of life (2)
3. Describe the structure and function of the four main types of biological macromolecules (2)
4. Identify and describe the structure and function of the parts of typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells (3)
5. Describe the properties of enzymes and their relation to cellular metabolism (4)
6. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of photosynthesis (5)
7. Explain and diagram the fundamental processes of cellular respiration (6)
8. Describe the biological processes of cell division including the cell cycle, mitosis, and meiosis (7)
9. Solve mendelian and nonmendelian genetics problems (8) (PBS 2)
10. Describe the fundamental processes of gene expression and control of gene expression (9)
11. Describe basic genetic engineering techniques and tools including recombinant DNA techniques and Polymerase Chain Reaction (10)
12. Conduct experiments, observe biological phenomena, and record information in a laboratory notebook (11)

4
BIO182 General Biology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 182. General Biology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 1182. Principles of plant and animal structure, function, and diversity; evolution, and ecology of populations and communities emphasizing biotic interactions. Primarily designed for biology and pre-professional majors. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Bacteria, fungi, and virus
2. Plant anatomy and physiology
3. Plant diversity
4. Animal anatomy and physiology
5. Animal diversity
6. Evolution and natural selection
7. Classification and phylogeny
8. Ecological principles
9. Population ecology
10. Community ecology

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the classification and characteristics of bacteria, fungi and virus.
2. Describe plant diversity in respect to structure, function, and classification.
3. Describe animal diversity in respect to structure, function, and classification.
4. Describe and analyze processes involved in evolution and natural selection. (PBS 1-3)
5. Describe the characteristics of each kingdom in biological classification.
6. Describe and demonstrate phylogenetic relationships of plants and animals. (PBS 1)
7. Describe and demonstrate the principles of ecology.
8. Describe and demonstrate the principles of population ecology.
9. Describe and demonstrate the principles of community ecology.

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BIO201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 201. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2201. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 181. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomical terms and homeostasis
2. Cytological and histological anatomy and functions
3. Integumentary system
4. Anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system
5. Axial and appendicular skeleton, joints
6. Anatomy and physiology of the muscular system
7. Gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles
8. Muscle contraction
9. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system
10. The central and peripheral nervous systems
11. The automatic nervous system
12. The senses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the parts of a typical cell and describe their function and structure. (1, 2)
2. Identify and describe the four basic tissue types, their anatomy and functions. (1, 2)
3. Describe the anatomy and functions of the integumentary system. (1, 3)
4. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system. (1, 4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy of joints, axial and appendicular skeletal systems. (1, 5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the muscular system. (1, 6)
7. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of muscles. (1, 7)
8. Describe the biological processes involved in muscle contraction. (1, 8) (PBS 1)
9. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. (1, 9)
10. Describe and identify brain and spinal cord anatomy and reflexes. (1, 10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in the nerve impulse. (1, 10, 11)
12. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology autonomic nervous system. (1, 10, 11)
13. Describe and identify the anatomy and physiology of the senses. (1, 12) (PBS 2,3)
14. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the human body. (3-12)
15. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-12)
16. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-12) (PBS 2)
17. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (2-12)
18. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-12)

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BIO202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 202. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2202. Structure and function of the human body. Topics include reproductive, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. Prerequisite: BIO 201. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands
2. Hormonal actions
3. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system
4. Anatomy and physiology of blood
5. Anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system
6. Anatomy and physiology of the immune system
7. Fetal membranes and blood circulation
8. Anatomy and physiology of the digestive system
9. Metabolism
10. Anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system
11. Blood pressure and flow dynamics
12. Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
13. Ventilation mechanisms and gas transport
14. Anatomy and physiology of the urinary system
15. Urine formation

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of endocrine glands. (1)
2. Describe the biological processes involved in hormonal actions. (2)
3. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system. (3)
4. Describe the anatomy and functions of blood. (4)
5. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system. (5)
6. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the immune system. (6)
7. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of fetal membranes and circulation. (7)
8. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system. (8)
9. Describe the biological processes involved in metabolism. (9)
10. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system. (10)
11. Describe the biological processes involved in blood pressure dynamics. (11)
12. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. (12)
13. Describe and identify ventilation mechanisms. (13)
14. Identify and describe the anatomy and physiology of the urinary system. (14)
15. Describe the biological processes involved urine formation. (15)
16. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the systems of the body. (1-15) (PBS 1)
17. Identify the broad themes that unify studying the systems of the body. (1-15)
18. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical representation of physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2)
19. Use the tools and equipment necessary for scientific analysis and research on physiological data and anatomical structures. (1-15) (PBS 2,3)
20. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-15)

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BIO205 Microbiology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
BIO 205. Microbiology (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoBIO 2205. Introduction to microorganisms and viruses of medical importance. Chemical and physical methods of microbial control; bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and viral drug therapy; the immune system response to infection; transmission of human disease; and common clinical presentation of various diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 156 or BIO 100 or BIO 181, and CHM 138 (Preferred) or CHM 130 or CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Microbial anatomy
2. Bacterial nutrition, metabolism, and physiology
3. Bacterial genetics
4. Physical and chemical control of microorganisms
5. Anti-microbial therapy
6. Basic principles of epidemiology
7. Humoral and Cellular immunity
8. Bacteria of medical importance
9. Viruses of medical importance
10. Fungi and protozoa of medical importance

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and describe the principal physical features of bacterial, fungal, and protozoal cells. (1) (PBS 1)
2. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to isolate, cultivate, and identify bacteria. Prepare a written summary of the identification. (2) (PBS 2,3)
3. Describe the method of inheritance in haploid microorganisms, with emphasis on mutation rate. (3) (PBS 2)
4. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to prepare sterile microbiological media and demonstrate the effects of chemical agents on bacterial growth. (4) (PBS 2,3)
5. Use the standard microbiological laboratory protocols to demonstrate the effects of antibiotics on medically important bacteria. (5)
6. Describe the various methods of transmission of human disease from other humans, the environment, and animal vectors.(6)
7. Describe the relationship between the human immune system and resistance to disease. (7)
8. Describe the important clinical features of human diseases due to bacteria. (8) (PBS 1)
9. Describe the principal structural and genetic features of medically important viruses, and their usual clinical presentation. (9) (PBS 1)
10. Describe the important clinical features of human diseases due to fungi and protozoa. (10)

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CHM151 General Chemistry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 151. General Chemistry I (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1151. Exploration of chemical measurement, classification, stoichiometry, and structure/function relationships for inorganic, organic and biological materials. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students. Prerequisite: MAT 122 or higher or two years of high school algebra. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Scientific method and measurement
a. Observation, description, and experiment
b. The metric system
c. Problem solving using dimensional analysis
2. Structure, properties, and classification of matter
a. Atomic structure and electron configurations
b. Elements, molecules, ions, and compounds,
c. Chemical formulas, equations, nomenclature
3. Physical behavior of matter
a. Gases, liquids and solids
b. Solutions and electrolytes
c. Concentration, and dilution
4. Stoichiometry and reactions
a. The mole concept
b. Writing and balancing chemical equations
c. Limiting reagent and reaction yield
5. Chemical reactions and behavior
a. Acids and bases, oxidation and reduction
6. Chemical bonding
a. Ionic vs. Covalent compounds
b. Lewis Structures
c. VSEPR and Valance Bond Theory
d. Molecular structure and properties
7. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry
a. Hydrocarbons, structural formulas, functional groups
8. Laboratory practice
a. Conventional and Instrumental analysis, experimental design, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.

LEARNING OUTCOMES::
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems using the concepts central to chemistry.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon.
b. Write equations that describe chemical change using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (8) (PBS 2)
a. Use standard glassware and instruments to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (8) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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CHM152 General Chemistry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 152. General Chemistry II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 1152. Advanced topics in general chemistry including chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base, and electrochemistry. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students, Prerequisite: CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Laboratory practice
a. Instrumental analysis, computer assisted data acquisition in a laboratory setting (pH titrations, etc.), experimental design, long term project management, electronic data processing and scientific report writing.
2. Solutions and Colligative Properties of Solutions
3. Chemical Kinetics: Reaction Mechanisms and Reaction Rates
4. Chemical Equilibrium: Equilibrium Constants, Reaction Diagrams, and Le Chatelier's Principle
5. Advanced Equilibrium Principles: Acid-Base behavior, pH and Titration Curves, Buffers and Buffer preparation, solubility products.
6. Chemical Thermodynamics: Enthalpy, Entropy, and Gibb?s Free Energy.
7. Electrochemistry: Balancing Redox Equations, Electrochemical Cells, Connections with Thermodynamics and Equilibrium
8. Nuclear Chemistry: Nuclear power, bombs, waste, radiologic dating, and writing nuclear equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Introductory aspects of organic, and biological chemistry1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-9) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with kinetic, equilibrium, thermodynamic, and electrochemical principles.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations collected in a traditional laboratory setting.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-9) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.
b. Write equations that represent chemical equilibrium, and mechanisms of reaction using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
d. Identify the correct analysis of a problem or explanation of a concept.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-9) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1) (PBS 2)
a. Use laboratory glassware and instruments in a traditional laboratory environment to manipulate and measure chemical quantities.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write a report, using chemical literature norms, to document the result of an investigation.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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CHM235 General Organic Chemistry I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 235. General Organic Chemistry I (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 2235. Chemistry of organic compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, stereo-chemistry, and structure. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors, and pre-professional students. Concurrent registration in CHM 235L recommended. Prerequisite: CHM 151. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Bonding, and Molecular Structure
2. Functional Groups and Infrared Spectroscopy
3. Hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes) structure, properties, reactivity and nomenclature
4. Stereochemistry-Chiral Molecules
5. Organic Reactions and Mechanisms - substitutions, eliminations, additions, oxidations/reductions, and radical reactions.
6. Preparation and reactions of alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides
7. Preparation and reactions of alcohols and ethers
8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with synthetic pathways and mechanisms of reaction.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers.
b. Write mechanistic diagrams that represent the step-by-step progress of organic reactions using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 4)
a. Use spectroscopic analysis to identify specific organic structures.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 5)
a. Write papers and/or short essays on research oriented topics associated the major themes and concepts presented during the term of study.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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AND CHM235L Gen Organic Chemistry I Lab

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 235L. General Organic Chemistry I Lab (1) (Fall). Laboratory techniques and practice with emphasis on separations, purification, synthesis and spectroscopic identification of organic structures. For science majors and pre-professional students. Prerequisite: CHM 235 (may be taken concurrently). Reading Proficiency. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Purification of Organic Molecules: separations, extraction, distillation, chromatography, and recrystallization
2. Synthesis of organic compounds
3. Functional groups and infrared spectroscopy
4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
5. Laboratory notebooks
6. Scientific reports
7. Organic laboratory glassware, equipment, instrumentation and techniques

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-6) (PBS 1,2,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated with synthetic pathways and mechanisms of reaction.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomena through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (5, 6) (PBS 1,2,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary (verbal and written) to describe and/or identify chemical phenomena associated with organic laboratory techniques.
b. Write mechanistic diagrams that represent the step-by-step progress of organic reactions using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Document the ongoing and final efforts associated with laboratory projects.
3.Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (3-6) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Use spectroscopic analysis to identify organic structures.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for research in the organic chemistry laboratory. (1-4, 7) (PBS 2)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (5, 6) (PBS 2,3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT MEASURES:
All CHM 235 students will maintain a portfolio of work in the form of a laboratory notebook. The notebook will document all laboratory efforts including any plots of spectroscopic, chromatographic or other comuter generated data. Students will prepare one report in the style of a professional chemistry publication. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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CHM236 General Organic Chemistry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 236. General Organic Chemistry II (4) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 2236. Advanced topics in organic chemistry including the synthesis and reactions of aromatic and carbonyl compounds. Chemical principles are presented at a level appropriate for science majors and pre-professional students. Concurrent registration in CHM 236L recommended. Prerequisite: CHM 235. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Spectroscopic Identification of Organic Compounds
2. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Dienes and Conjugated Molecules.
3. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Aromatic Molecules.
4. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Aldehydes and Ketones.
5. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Carboxylic Acids and Carboxylic Acid Derivatives.
6. Properties, Synthesis, and Reactions of Amines.
7. Electrophilic and Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions
8. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions of Carbonyls
9. Introduction to the properties and reactions of Amino Acids and Proteins
10. Introduction to the properties and reactions of lipids and carbohydrates.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Solve chemical problems associated synthetic pathways and mechanisms of reaction.
b. Draw conclusions regarding physical and chemical phenomenon through evaluation of data and observations.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-10) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use appropriate scientific vocabulary to describe or identify chemical phenomenon associated with aromatic and carbonyl compounds
b. Write mechanistic diagrams that represent the step-by-step progress of organic reactions using accepted nomenclature and symbols.
c. Describe the major themes associated with concepts presented during the term of study.
3. Interpret the numerical and graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-10) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use data to support a conclusion or interpretation.
b. Draw conclusions from chemical information presented on graphs.
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-10) (PBS 2,3)
a. Use spectroscopic analysis to identify specific organic structures.
b. Use computer generated graphics and computer modeling programs to illustrate and model the mechanisms and structures associated with organic transformations.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-10) (PBS 2,3)
a. Write papers and/or short essays on research oriented topics associated the major themes and concepts presented during the term of study.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Students will complete a common comprehensive written final exam. Assessment will also include departmental pre-semester and post-semester evaluations. Instructors may utilize a variety of additional assessment measures including, but not limited to, quizzes, mid-term exams, written assignments, and homework. In all cases the required assessment measures will be outlined on the course syllabus.

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AND CHM236L Gen Organic Chemistry II Lab

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
CHM 236L. General Organic Chemistry II Lab (1) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoCHM 2236. Additional techniques in organic chemistry; preparation, separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 236 (may be taken concurrently) and CHM 235L. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Preparation of homophthalic acid
2. The Wittig reaction
3. Synthesis and resolutionary--phenylethylamine
4. Acetoacetic ester and malonic ester synthesis
5. Sandmeyer reaction
6. Beckmann rearrangement; benzylic acid rearrangement
7. Carbenes
8. Crossed aldo condensation
9. Individual project

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Demonstrate laboratory techniques including steam and vacuum distillation, thin layer chromatography, vapor phase chromatography, photochemical reaction techniques.
2. Demonstrate ability to complete multi-step synthesis.
3. Demonstrate ability to resolve enantiomers.
4. Demonstrate ability to plan, design and complete and individual project in either synthesis a natural product and purification.

1
ENV110 Environmental Geology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
ENV 110. Environmental Geology (4). Introduction to geologic studies and their application to environmental problems, causes and possible solutions. Includes geologic processes, geohazards, and geologic natural resources. This course is cross-listed with GLG 110. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The role of population in environmental problems.
2. Basic geology, including rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, and basic surface processes
3. Earthquakes
4. Volcanism
5. Streams and flooding
6. Mass wasting and slope stability
7. Climate, as related to geology
8. Water as a resource
9. Soil
10. Mineral resources
11. Energy resources, including coal, oil, and natural gas
12. Alternative energy resources
13. Waste disposal
14. Water and air pollution

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-13) (PBS 1,2)
a. Use scientific methods used to explain geological and environmental concepts and theories. (PBS 1,2)
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-13) (PBS 3)
a. Recognize the role of population in environmental issues. (PBS 3)
b. Identify and explain the causes and hazards of some natural geologic processes. (PBS 3)
c. Describe the role of natural resources in modern culture and the problems caused by their extraction and exploitation. (PBS 1,2)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-13) (PBS 2)
a. Identify, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate data associated with the discipline of environmental geology. (PBS 2)
b. Draw conclusions from geologic data presented on graphs or charts regarding population, earthquakes, volcanoes, streams and flooding, mass wasting, atmospheric composition, natural resources (water, soil, mineral and energy), alternative energy, waste disposal and water pollution. (PBS 2)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (2) (PBS 2)
a. Perform basic laboratory skills to identify the physical properties of minerals and rocks. (PBS 2)
b. Use topographic maps. PBS (2)
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-13) (PBS 1)

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OR GLG110 Environmental Geology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GLG 110. Environmental Geology (4). Introduction to geologic studies and their application to environmental problems, causes and possible solutions. Includes geologic processes, geohazards, and geologic natural resources. This course is cross-listed with ENV 110. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1.The role of population in environmental problems.
2. Basic geology, including rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, and basic surface processes
3. Earthquakes
4. Volcanism
5. Streams and flooding
6. Mass wasting and slope stability
7. Climate, as related to geology
8. Water as a resource
9. Soil
10. Mineral resources
11. Energy resources, including coal, oil, and natural gas
12. Alternative energy resources
13. Waste disposal
14. Water and air pollution

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-13) (PBS 1,3)
a. Use scientific methods used to explain geological and environmental concepts and theories. (PBS 1,3)
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-13)
a. Recognize the role of population in environmental issues.
b. Identify and explain the causes and hazards of some natural geologic processes.
c. Describe the role of natural resources in modern culture and the problems caused by their extraction and exploitation. (PBS 3)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-13) (PBS 2)
a. Identify, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate data associated with the discipline of environmental geology. (PBS 2)
b. Draw conclusions from geologic data presented on graphs or charts regarding population, earthquakes, volcanoes, streams and flooding, mass wasting, atmospheric composition, natural resources (water, soil, mineral and energy), alternative energy, waste disposal and water pollution. (PBS 2,3)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (2)
a. Perform basic laboratory skills to identify the physical properties of minerals and rocks.
b. Use topographic maps.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-13)

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GEO103 Intro Physical Geography

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GEO 103. Introduction to Physical Geography (4). A geographic introduction to the physical processes and landforms of the earth. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Physical geography tools and terminology
2. Earth's origins and energy systems
3. Atmospheric systems and weather
4. Climates and biomes
5. Earth history and geomorphology of landforms
6. Plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanism
7. Fluvial, marine, glacial and Aeolian landform processes
8. Human-environment interactions and environmental change

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Employ tools of a geographer to test physical geography concepts. (1-8) (PBS 1)
2. Diagram earth's energy and atmospheric systems, and summarize ocean-atmosphere interactions. (2,3)
3. Relate atmospheric processes, temperature patterns and moisture to weather and atmospheric disturbances. (2-4)
4. Classify climate zones and biomes and discuss climate anomalies. (4,8)
5. Use scientific theories to investigate earth's history, structure and surface landforms. (5-7) (PBS 2)
6. Describe the impact of fluvial, Aeolian, marine and glacial processes on landforms. (5,7)
7. Synthesize geographic theories and recent research on human-environment interactions. (1,3,4,6,8) (PBS 3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Demonstrate thoughtful and precise writing skills by completing at least 1500 words of monitored writing.

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GEO212 Intro to Meteorology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GEO 212. Introduction to Meteorology (4). Physical and chemical conditions that regulate global weather phenomena. Includes structure of the atmosphere, temperature, humidity, air pressure and winds, the development of weather systems, tornadoes and hurricanes, and the parameters that affect local and global climate. Laboratory includes image interpretation, field observation and prediction. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Origin of the atmosphere, earth/sun relations and energy systems including the greenhouse effect
2. Atmospheric pressure, air pollution and local and regional wind patterns
3. Hydrologic cycle including humidity and stability of air masses and air-sea interactions
4. Clouds, precipitation, frontal systems and severe weather
5. Tropical and midlatitude systems including wave cyclones, tropical cyclones and tornadoes
6. Atmospheric circulation patterns & oscillations including monsoonal winds, El Nino & global circulation models
7. Global climate patterns, climate change and global warming
8. Meteorological methods and tools for weather monitoring, analysis and forecasting including remote sensing, observations and weather mapping

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the origin and structure of the earth and its atmosphere. (1, 7) (PBS 1)
2. Use scientific reasoning to explain the relationship between the earth and sun and how solar and terrestrial radiation affects temperature, air pressure and wind patterns. (1, 2, 7, 8)
3. Explain the role of heat, moisture and winds in generating clouds, precipitation and severe weather. (2-6, 8)
4. Model major atmospheric circulation systems and oscillations. (1-8)
5. Describe climatic regions and assess climate change predictions. (1-8)
6. Interpret meteorological data to predict weather conditions. (1-8)(PBS 2)

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GLG101 Intro to Geology I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GLG 101. Introduction to Geology I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoGLG 1101. Geologic principles emphasizing the structure and composition of the earth, internal and external earth processes and plate tectonics. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The scientific method
2. Elemental composition of crust
3. Physical properties of minerals
4. Mineral keys and identification of common minerals
5. The rock cycle
6. Igneous rocks and igneous processes.
7. Weathering
8. Sedimentary rocks and sedimentary processes
9. Metamorphic rocks and metamorphic processes
10. Plate tectonics:
a. development of theory
b. plate boundaries
c. implications for local/regional landscape development
d. critical analysis of this theory in its historical context
11. Seismicity
12. Geologic structures and their development: folds and faults
13. Geologic time, including fundamental principles of historical geology
14. Maps: topographic and geologic
15. Critical analysis, synthesis, and expression of geologic data in a precise manner

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1.Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-13) (PBS 1)
a. Describe and utilize the scientific method. (PBS 1)
b. Identify rocks and minerals and rock-forming processes.
c. Describe fundamental geologic principles
d. Define common geologic terms.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (5-12)
a. Recognize plate tectonics as the unifying theory for earth science.
b. Describe the theory of plate tectonics, its historical development, and plate boundary interactions and their consequences. (PBS 3)
c. Predict outcomes of tectonic interactions.
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data (1-15) (PBS 2)
a. Identify, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate data associated with the discipline of physical geology.
b. Draw conclusions from geologic data presented on graphs or charts regarding earth?s interior, minerals, rocks, plate tectonics, seismicity, geologic time and geologic structures. (PBS 2,3)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research (3-5 and 14)
a. Perform laboratory skills used to identify the physical properties of minerals and rocks.
b. Use a rock/mineral key.
c. Use topographic and geologic maps.
5. Record the results of investigation through writing (15)

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GLG102 Intro to Geology II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
GLG 102. Introduction to Geology II (4) (Spring). Earth's origin and history, including plate tectonics and the consequent movement and distribution of lands and seas through time; basic concepts of age-dating, stratigraphy, and the study of fossils; the geologic time scale and development of life on earth. Prerequisite: GLG 100 or GLG 101. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Sedimentary rocks
2. Stratigraphy and sedimentation
3. Plate tectonics: plate boundaries; plate motions through time; implications for regional/global landscape development through time
4. Relative and absolute dating
5. Geologic time and the development of the geologic time scale
6. Evolution
7. Fossil organisms, including identifications, classification, and basic morphology
8. Geologic eras, periods, and epochs, particularly the details of North American continental development
9. Development of life from its beginnings to the present
10. Maps: geologic, paleogeographic, lithofacies, paleotectonic, and isopach

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-3, 6, 7, 9) (PBS 1)
a. Recognize sedimentary rocks.
b. Describe the development of life forms known from rocks, through time.
c. Describe the effects of plate movements on the global landscape.
d. Identify basic fossils.
e. Identify life forms through time.
2. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (2-4, 6)
a. Describe and utilize the principles of stratigraphy and sedimentation.
b. Describe plate tectonics as the unifying theory for earth science.
c. Identify and describe the principles of relative and absolute age-dating methods.
d. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate and explain the major evidence for evolution and some of its potential consequences. (PBS 3)
3. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data (3-8) (PBS 2)
a. Identify, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate data associated with the discipline of historical geology. (PBS 2)
b. Draw conclusions from geologic data presented on graphs or charts regarding sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, plate tectonics, age dating, geologic time, evolution and fossils. (PBS 2,3)
4. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research (7, 10)
a. Use maps: geologic, paleogeographic, lithofacies, paleotectonic, and isopach.
b. Identify basic fossils
5. Record the results of investigation through writing (1-10)

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MAT187 Precalculus

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 187. Precalculus (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 1187.Topics from college algebra and trigonometry essential to the study of calculus and analytic geometry. Includes linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, circular, and trigonometric functions, trigonometry, systems of equations, and matrices. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Duplicate credit for MAT 152 and/or MAT 183 and MAT 187 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: MAT 122, or two years of high school algebra and one year of geometry completed with grades of "C" or better each semester within the last 2 years, or an ACT Math score of at least 22, or an SAT Math score of at least 530, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics skills assessment. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Functions: Definitions and Operations
a. linear
b. quadratic
c. polynomial
d. rational
e. exponential
f. logarithmic
g. circular
h. trigonometric
2. Trigonometry
3. Systems of equations
4. Matrices
5. Graphing calculators & computer software
6. Vectors

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use definitions and operations associated with functions, including inverses, combinations, and compositions. (1,2) (QL 1)
2. Represent and interpret functions in a variety of ways; numeric, symbolic, graphic, and verbal. (1-5) (QL 3,4)
3. Solve equations and systems using a variety of techniques including algebraic and graphical. (1-5) (QL 4)
4. Graph basic functions and use translations to reflect changes made to basic functions. (1-3) (QL 1,3)
5. Apply mathematics in context and model real situations using mathematics. (1-4,6) (QLO 2)
6. Use basic trigonometric properties and identities. (1,2,4) (QL 1)
7. Communicate findings both in writing and orally using mathematical language and symbolism with supporting data and graphs. (1-5) (QL 1,3)

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MAT230 Calculus & Analytic Geomtry II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 230. Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2230. Concepts, techniques and applications of integration, infinite series, and introduction to differential equations. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 220. Reading Proficiency. Five lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Techniques of integration including substitution, integration by parts, and integration tables
2. Numerical methods for integration
3. Applications of integration
4. Infinite Series
5. Taylor series and polynomials
6. Separable differential equations
7. Parametric and Polar Curves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Use integration techniques to solve both definite and indefinite integrals. (1) (QL 1)
2. Find definite integrals numerically. (2) (QL 1,3)
3. Use integration to solve applied problems. (3) (QL2)
4. Determine the convergence of infinite series (4) (QL 1,3,4)
5. Use Taylor series and polynomials to approximate functions. (5) (QL 1,3)
6. Solve separable differential equations. (6) (QL 2,4)
7. Solve problems using parametric and polar equations (7) (QL 2-4)

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MAT241 Calculus III

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 241. Calculus III (4) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2241. Multivariable calculus. Includes multiple integration, partial differentiation, optimization, vector calculus, line integrals, and parametric curves. Note: Computer use and graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 recommended). Prerequisite: MAT 230. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Vectors
2. Planes and surfaces
3. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
4. Functions of several variables
5. Partial differentiation
6. Optimization
7. Multiple integration
8. Integration techniques
9. Vector calculus

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve problems using vectors in 3-space. (1) (QL 1,2,4)
2. Use equations of planes and surfaces to solve problems. (2) (QL 1, 2,4)
3. Solve problems using cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. (3) (QL 1,2,4)
4. Find partial derivatives. (4,5) (QL 1)
5. Find extremes of functions of two variables. (4-6) (QL 1-4)
6. Find differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, and tangent planes. (4-6) (QL 1,2)
7. Integrate multiple integrals. (7,8) (QL 1)
8. Solve applied problems requiring multiple integrals. (8,9) (QL 1,2)
9. Define and identify vector fields. (9) (QL 1,2)
10. Find line and surface ingegrals. (9) (QL 1,2)
11. Use Divergence, Curl, Green's Theoremj, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. (9) (QL 1,2)

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MAT262 Elementary Differential Equatn

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
MAT 262. Elementary Differential Equations (3) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoMAT 2262. Introduction to ordinary differential equations. Includes first order linear equations, higher order linear equations, applications of first and second order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 241. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. First order linear differential equations
2. Linear differential equations of higher order
3. Laplace transforms
4. Systems of linear equations
5. Numerical methods
6. Qualitative techniques
7. Applications of first and second order equations

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Solve first order differential equations that are separable or linear. (QL 1,2,4)
2. Solve second order linear differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
3. Use Laplace transforms to solve differential equations. (QL 1,2,4)
4. Solve systems of linear differential equations using matrices. (QL 1,2,4)
5. Use qualitative techniques to graph solutions of differential equations. (QL 1-4)
6. Use numerical methods to solve differential equations. (QL 1-4)
7. Solve applied problems involving differential equations. (QL 1-4)

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PHY111 General Physics I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 111. General Physics I (4). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1111. Topics include: time and motion studies, forces on stationary and moving objects, waves and sound, heat and energy. Designed for architecture, forestry, pre-med, pre-vet, pharmacy and education students. Prerequisite: MAT 187 or MAT 152 and MAT 183. MAT 187 is strongly recommended. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Statics
2. Kinematics
3. Dynamics
4. Conservation of energy and momentum
5. Rotational mechanics
6. Gravitational and astronomical laws
7. Waves, sound, simple harmonic motion
8. Heat and energy.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the kinematics and dynamics of constant velocity motion, constant acceleration motion, projectile motion, uniform circular motion, rotational motion, collisions and explosions, simple harmonic motion, and basic wave phenomena. (1-7) (PBS 1-3)
2. Apply Newton's laws to physical problems. (3-7) (PBS 2-3)
3. Apply conservation laws to physical problems. (4,5) (PBS 2)
4. State the laws of thermodynamics and apply them to basic situations. (8) (PBS 2)
5. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
6. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1)
7. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2, 3)
8. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
9. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 1,2,3)

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PHY112 General Physics II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 112. General Physics II (4) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1112. Electricity, magnetism, light, physical optics, geometric optics, and atomic structure. Designed for pre-med, pre-vet, and pharmacy students. Prerequisite: PHY 111. Reading Proficiency. Three lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Electricity and magnetism
2. Light and optics
3. Atomic transformations
4. Nuclear transformations
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Apply electric and magnetic forces and fields to basic statics and dynamics problems. (1) (PBS 2)
2. State the relationships between electric potential and electric fields, and apply the relationships to basic electrostatic situations. (1) (PBS 2)
3. Build and analyze basic circuits, and solve basic circuit problems. (1) (PBS 2,3)
4. Build and analyze simple optical systems, and solve basic optical problems. (2) (PBS 2,3)
5. Calculate the energies and wavelengths of spectral lines in atomic spectra. (2,3) (PBS 2)
6. Measure nuclear radiation levels. (4) (PBS 2,3)
7. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-4) (PBS 2,3)
8. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-4) (PBSO 1)
9. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-4) (PBS 2,3)
10. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-4) (PBS 2,3)
11. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-4) (PBS 1-3)

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PHY150 Physics Scientists/Engineer I

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 150. Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (5) (Fall). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1121. Principles of mechanics. Kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, equilibrium, fluids, gravitation, and oscillations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 220. One year of high school physics or PHY 111/112 is strongly recommended. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Kinematics and dynamics of individual particles and systems of particles.
2. Newton's laws of motion
3. Linear and rotational motion
4. Kinetic and potential energy
5. Work
6. Collisions
7. Gravitation
8. Equilibrium and statics
9. Fluid statics and dynamics
10. Oscillations
11. Conservation laws: linear momentum, angular momentum, energy

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the kinematics and dynamics of constant velocity motion, constant acceleration motion, projectile motion, uniform circular motion, collisions and explosions, rotational motion, equilibrium, orbital motion, and simple harmonic motion. (1-8, 10,11) (PBS 1-3)
2. Analyze the behavior of ideal fluids. (9) (PBS 2)
3. Apply Newton's laws to physical problems. (2,3,7,10) (PBS 2,3)
4. Apply conservation laws to physical problems. (11) (PBS 2)
5. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
6. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-11) (PBS 1)
7. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
8. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-11) (PBS 2,3)
9. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-11) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

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PHY151 Physics Scientists/Engineer II

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHY 151. Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (5) (Spring). Shared Unique Numbering LogoPHY 1131. Waves and sound, electromagnetism, circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell's equations, with calculus applications. For engineering and physics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 230 and PHY 150. Reading Proficiency. Four lecture. Three lab.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Waves, sound
2. Electric charge and current
3. Electric and magnetic fields in vacuum and in materials
4. Induction
5. DC and AC circuits
6. Displacement current
7. Maxwell's equations
8. Electromagnetic waves

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe and analyze basic wave phenomena, including applications to music. (1) (PBS 2)
2. Apply electric and magnetic forces and fields to basic statics and dynamics problems. (2,3) (PBSO 2)
3. Analyze the behaviors of, and relationships between, charged particles, electric fields, magnetic fields, and electromagnetic waves. (3,4,6-8) (PBS 2)
4. Design, construct, and analyze simple electrical circuits. (5) (PBS 2,3)
5. State Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism, and discuss the physical meaning of each. (7) (PBS 2)
6. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate physical and natural phenomena. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
7. Identify the unifying themes of the scientific field of study. (1-8) (PBS 1)
8. Interpret the numerical and/or graphical presentation of scientific data. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
9. Use the tools and equipment necessary for basic scientific analysis and research. (1-8) (PBS 2,3)
10. Record the results of investigation through writing. (1-8) (PBS 1-3)

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Convey the intent, method and result of a laboratory experiment in writing.

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1 - Courses selected in this block of units should be carefully chosen to meet prerequisite and major program requirements that will apply to the intended transfer degree. A transfer educational plan should be developed in consultation with an academic advisor and students should consult their transfer school�s transfer guides and choose courses from those listed (other courses may also apply with Advisor approval).

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.