Justice Studies Certificate    Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Program Director Michael Davis (928) 717-7938
Associate Dean Kim Ewing (928) 717-7923
Dean John Morgan (928) 717-7721

Quick Facts


About the Justice Studies Certificate

The Justice Studies certificate program is designed for students interested in a broad range of criminal justice careers, without a law enforcement focus. The program includes the study of crime and delinquency and the theories, policies and practices of the criminal justice system.

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Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Justice Studies Certificate program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Explain the historical development of American criminal law from its English common law roots to the present. (AJS 101)
  2. Analyze criminal conduct in the context of historical, social, political and legal developments. (AJS 101)
  3. Analyze the intersection of law, morality, and ethics in modern society. (AJS 123)
  4. Analyze current issues and trends in crime rates, criminal behavior, and social trends as they impact the criminal justice process. (AJS 200)
  5. Outline the modern philosophies, organization and treatment/intervention goals of the juvenile justice system. (AJS 212)
  6. Identify and summarize the various theories of the causes of criminal behavior. (AJS 225)
  7. Describe the economic and psychological impact of crime on society. (AJS 225)
  8. Identify and explain victimology and the crisis interventions afforded to victims of crime and their families. (AJS 226)
  9. Discuss new discoveries in neuroscience and how our increased understanding of the brain is having direct impact on the criminal justice system. (AJS 278)
  10. Identify the key provisions of the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution that pertain to civil liberties and civil rights, and explain various competing theories of constitutional interpretation and judicial review. (AJS 290)
 

Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
AJS101 Intro Admin of Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 101. Introduction to Administration of Justice (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoAJS 1101. Overview of the criminal justice system. Organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial, and correctional systems. History and philosophy of each component of the criminal justice system and interrelations among the various agencies. Career opportunities and qualifying requirements. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The social, political and legal issues defining crime
2. Statistical instruments used to measure crime
3. Law enforcement
a. History and philosophy
b. Organization and jurisdiction
c. Legal issues and due process
d. Recruitment, selection, and career opportunities
4. Judicial system
a. History and philosophy
b. Organization and jurisdiction
c. Due process of law
d. Pretrial and trial procedures
e. Professions related to the judicial system
5. Correctional system
a.History and philosophy
b. Organization and structure
c. Due process
d. Sentencing guidelines
e. Career opportunities
6. Overview of Juvenile Justice System
7. Future of criminal justice

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define crime in the context of social, political, and legal issues.
2. Identify the statistical instruments used to measure crime.
3. Identify and describe the organization and jurisdiction of the three components of the criminal justice system: Law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
4. Explain the history and philosophy of the three components of the criminal justice system.
5. Define due process of law in relation to each of the three components of the criminal justice system.
6. Identify and describe the organization and jurisdiction of the juvenile justice system.
7. Discuss future directions in the criminal justice system.
8. List career opportunities and qualifying requirements within the three components of the criminal justice system.

3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 123. Ethics and Criminal Justice (3). Ethical issues, cultural influences and moral theories as they relate to the justice system. Focus on underlying values and ethical challenges faced by law enforcement, attorneys, the judiciary and correctional staff. Specific ethical scenarios common to he criminal justice system will be addressed. Emphasis on critical thinking and value decision making. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Morality, ethics and human behavior
2. Origins and concept of justice
3. Ethical decisions
4. Law and the individual
5. Ethics and criminal justice professionals
6. The police role in society: crime fighter or public servant
7. Ethics and legal professionals
8. Justice and judicial ethics
9. Ethics of punishment and corrections
10. Fundamentals of critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define ethics, morality and values. (1) (CT 1)
2. Describe the intersection of law, standards of morality, ethics and society. (1-3) (CT 1-3)
3. Describe the core elements of justice, punishment and law. (2) (CT 1-3)
4. Analyze the difference between distributive and retributive justice systems. (2) (CT 3,4)
5. Identify ethical and justice theories and explain their historical origins. (3) (CT 1-3)
6. Explain the purpose of codes and ethics. (4) (CT 1,2)
7. Identify and explain key ethical issues confronting law enforcement. (5,6) (CT 1- 4)
8. Identify and explain the factors involved in the use of discretion. (7) (CT 3)
9. Explain ethical considerations faced by members of the court. (8) (CT 1- 4)
10. Analyze ethical issues confronting correctional personnel. (9) (CT 1- 4)
11. Describe and model the fundamental concepts of critical thinking, including the barriers to critical thought and the recognition that closure is not always achieved in intellectual discourse. (10) (CT 1-4)

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AJS200 Curr Issue/Criminal Just

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 200. Current Issues in Criminal Justice (3). Current issues, trends, and techniques related to and affecting the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Crime in the United States
a. criminal behavior
b. murder rates
c. race issues
d. drugs and crime
e. the criminal justice process
2. Victimology
a. victim rights
b. childhood victimization
c. battered women
3. Police
a. community policing
b. multiculturalism
c. use of deadly force and pursuits
d. ethics
4. Judicial System
a. jury system
b. expert witnesses
c. insanity defense
5. Juvenile Justice
a. transfers to adult court
b. kids and guns
c. teen courts
6. Punishment and Corrections
a. trends in probation
b. race issues
c. women in prison
d. prison overcrowding
e. death penalty

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain how current social issues, trends in criminal behavior, and the criminal justice process itself effects crime rates
2. Discuss current issues effecting victims of crime
3. Identify and explain current social issues affecting police work.
4. Discuss current policy issues related to police work.
5. Discuss specific issues related to the contemporary judicial system.
6. Assess recent trends in juvenile crime and resulting current philosophies and practices in juvenile justice.
7. Evaluate trends and policies in corrections based on current literary courses.

3
AJS212 Juvenile Justice Procedure

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 212. Juvenile Justice Procedures (3). History and development of juvenile justice theories, procedures and institutions. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the juvenile justice system
2. Overview of the modern-day juvenile justice system.
3. Juvenile delinquency and the law
4. Police interaction with juveniles
5. Juvenile justice procedures
6. Current issues and problems with the juvenile justice system

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Outline the historical development of the juvenile justice system.
2. Outline the modern philosophies, organization and treatment/intervention goals of the juvenile justice system.
3. Name and explain landmark cases related to current juvenile justice laws.
4. Describe law enforcement procedures related to juvenile delinquency.
5. Outline juvenile justice procedures from arrest/intake through disposition.
6. Identify and discuss current issues and problems associated with the juvenile justice system.

3
AJS225 Criminology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 225. Criminology (3). Theories of criminality and the economic, social and psychological impact of crime, victimization, and the relationships between statistics and crime trends. The study of deviance and society's role in defining behavior. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Theories of criminal behavior
2. Crime statistics and trends
3. Categories of crime
4. The impact of crime on society
5. Social structure and criminality

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and summarize the various theories of criminal behavior.
2. Analyze the relationship between crime statistics and trends.
3. Categorize types of crimes.
4. Describe the economic and psychological impact of crime on society.
5. Explain the relationship between social status and criminality.

3
AJS226 Victimology and Crisis Interv

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 226. Victimology and Crises Intervention (3). The study of victims of crime, including reasons that some individuals are victimized and the legal protections afforded to victims. Includes crisis interventions by the criminal justice system to assist victims and their families. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The study of victims of crime
2. Reasons some individuals are victimized
3. Legal protections afforded to victims of crime
4. Crisis interventions by the criminal justice system
5. Counseling and community services for victims of crime and their families

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define Victimology. (1)
2. Explain why some individuals are victimized. (2)
3. Analyze the legal protections afforded to victims of crime. (3)
4. Identify and describe various crisis interventions by the criminal justice system following crimes such as murder, sexual assault, domestic violence and child abuse. (4)
5. Discuss the role of counseling and community services for victims of crime and their families. (5)

3
AJS278 Neuroscience and the Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 278. Neuroscience and the Law (3). A multi-disciplinary look at how new discoveries in neuroscience and our understanding of the brain are having a direct impact on the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Existence of free will
2. Neuroscience of decision-making
3. Punishment, blameworthiness and rehabilitation
4. Adolescent brains and juvenile justice
5. Mental Illness/insanity defense
6. Memory and eyewitness identification

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the key neuroscience and consciousness theories concerning whether humans have free will. (1)
2. Discuss the implications of brain scans on our understanding of decision-making. (2)
3. Evaluate different theories of punishment and rehabilitation in light of latest neurological findings. (3)
4. Explain the differences in adult and adolescent brains and the effects on juvenile justice. (4)
5. Discuss the implications of latest neurological findings on legal concepts of mental illness and insanity. (5)
6. Discuss the implications of latest neurological findings on memory and their impact on eyewitness identification. (6)

3
AJS290 Constitutional Law/Civil Lib

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 290. Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3). The United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Includes the impact of U.S. Supreme Court opinions on the history and development of civil liberties and civil rights, particularly as they pertain to the administration of justice and law enforcement. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The Bill of Rights and U.S. Constitutional guarantees for civil liberties and civil rights
2. Constitutional interpretation and judicial review
3. Landmark U.S. Supreme Court opinions
4. Supreme Court interpretations of the Constitution on the administration of justice and law enforcement
5. The Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and the application of the privileges or immunities, due process and equal protection clauses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the key provisions of the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution that pertain to civil liberties and civil rights. (1)
2. Explain various competing theories of constitutional interpretation and judicial review. (2)
3. Analyze U.S. Supreme Court case law. (3)
4. Explain landmark Supreme Court rulings on civil liberties and civil rights. (3)
5. Describe the impact of key Supreme Court opinions on the administration of justice and law enforcement, including Miranda rights, the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, right to counsel, trial by jury, and double jeopardy. (4)
6. Identify the key provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment and the privileges or immunities, due process and equal protection clauses. (5)
7. Explain competing theories of incorporation of the Fourteenth Amendment. (5)

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Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.