Law Enforcement and Corrections Certificate    Click here to request more info


Program Contacts

Program Director Michael Davis (928) 717-7938
Dean Jill Fitzgerald (928) 776-2277

Quick Facts


About the Law Enforcement and Corrections Certificate

The Law Enforcement and Corrections certificate is designed for those interested in training in the law enforcement/corrections field. Emphasis is on the study of crime and delinquency within the criminal justice system, particularly as to the response of law enforcement, corrections and the courts to violations of the law.

The Intensive Police Academy (AIS 291) is accredited by the Arizona Peace Officers Standards and Training Board (AZ POST) in providing Basic Peace Officer training to individuals meeting the requirements of the training board and appointing police agencies. The curriculum includes the study of criminal investigations, police community relations, traffic accident investigation, introduction to administration of justice, law, legal principles, patrol procedures, vehicle operations, report and technical writing, physical conditioning, defense tactics, impact weapons, firearm proficiency and safety, first aid, fundamentals of hazardous materials, stress management and use of force. Students must be screened and appointed by an Arizona Law Enforcement Agency. Upon successful completion of AJS 291, students are eligible to be hired as police officers in the state.

Note:  

Students enrolling in AJS 291 must be screened and appointed by an Arizona Law Enforcement Agency.

 

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Law Enforcement and Corrections Certificate program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Explain the historical development of American criminal law from its English common law roots to the present. (AJS 101, AJS 291)
  2. Analyze criminal conduct in the context of historical, social, political and legal developments. (AJS 101, AJS 109, AJS 291)
  3. Identify the organization and jurisdiction of local, state and federal law enforcement, courts and correctional systems. (AJS 101, AJS 230, AJS 240, AJS 291)
  4. Describe the relationships between the three components of the criminal justice system. (AJS 109, AJS 230, AJS 240, AJS 291)
  5. Summarize the philosophy of legal sanctions and corrections and the historical development of theories of punishment and rehabilitation. (AJS 109, AJS 240, AJS 291)
  6. Analyze the intersection of law, morality and ethics in our modern society. (AJS 123, AJS 291)
  7. Summarize the modern scientific tools used in criminal investigation. (AJS 170, AJS 291)
  8. Analyze the role of the US Supreme Court in defining the Constitutional protections and procedural due process safeguards in the criminal justice system. (AJS 260, AJS 291)
  9. Describe the economic and psychological impact of crime on society. (AJS 240, AJS 291)
  10. Write a concise public services report using basic word processing skills. (AJS 103, AJS 291)
  11. Apply all types, purposes and techniques of patrol procedures (AJS 230, AJS 291) 
 

Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
Option 1 Requirements:
AJS101 Intro Admin of Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 101. Introduction to Administration of Justice (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoAJS 1101. Overview of the criminal justice system. Organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial, and correctional systems. History and philosophy of each component of the criminal justice system and interrelations among the various agencies. Career opportunities and qualifying requirements. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The social, political and legal issues defining crime
2. Statistical instruments used to measure crime
3. Law enforcement
a. History and philosophy
b. Organization and jurisdiction
c. Legal issues and due process
d. Recruitment, selection, and career opportunities
4. Judicial system
a. History and philosophy
b. Organization and jurisdiction
c. Due process of law
d. Pretrial and trial procedures
e. Professions related to the judicial system
5. Correctional system
a.History and philosophy
b. Organization and structure
c. Due process
d. Sentencing guidelines
e. Career opportunities
6. Overview of Juvenile Justice System
7. Future of criminal justice

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define crime in the context of social, political, and legal issues.
2. Identify the statistical instruments used to measure crime.
3. Identify and describe the organization and jurisdiction of the three components of the criminal justice system: Law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
4. Explain the history and philosophy of the three components of the criminal justice system.
5. Define due process of law in relation to each of the three components of the criminal justice system.
6. Identify and describe the organization and jurisdiction of the juvenile justice system.
7. Discuss future directions in the criminal justice system.
8. List career opportunities and qualifying requirements within the three components of the criminal justice system.

3
AJS103 Public Safety Report Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 103. Public Safety Report Writing (3) (Summer). Introduction to effective report writing in a variety of public safety incident settings, including law enforcement, fire safety and emergency medical situations. Emphasis on clear and concise writing as well as the legal ramifications of public safety reports. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Objectives of writing public safety reports
2. Writing public safety reports
3. Basic grammar and spelling
4. Chronological and topical ordering
5. Proofreading and editing
6. Basic computer skills and word processing programs
7. Legal implications and ramifications of public safety reports
8. Records retention and report confidentiality

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the larger objectives of writing public safety reports. (1)
2. Write reports that are concise and free of jargon. (2)
3. Use basic grammar and spelling skills. (3)
4. Craft a report in either chronological or topical order. (2, 4)
5. Proofread and edit a report. (5)
6. Use basic computer and word processing skills. (6)
7. Analyze legal ramifications and implications of public safety reports. (7)
8. Explain basic regulatory and legal requirements concerning records retention and report confidentiality. (8)

3
AJS109 Substantive Criminal Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 109. Substantive Criminal Law (3). Nature, origins, purposes, structure and operation of the American criminal justice system. Constitutional limitations. Classification and basic elements of crimes. Common defenses to crimes. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Origins and structure of the criminal justice system
2. Constitutional limitations on American criminal law
3. Classification and basic elements of crimes
4. Defenses to crime
5. Punishment and sentencing for crime
6. Types of crimes including: homicide and other crimes against persons; crimes against habitation and other crimes against property; white collar and public order crimes; drug- and alcohol-related crimes; obstruction of justice and organized crime

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the origins and structure of the American criminal justice system. (1)
2. Identify the primary constitutional limits on American criminal law. (2)
3. List the classifications and basic elements of crimes. (3)
4. Identify the general defenses to criminal liability. (4)
5. Describe basic issues of criminal punishment and sentencing. (5)
6. Apply the elements of specific types of crimes to given fact patterns to determine if crimes have been committed. (6)

3
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 123. Ethics and Criminal Justice (3). Ethical issues, cultural influences and moral theories as they relate to the justice system. Focus on underlying values and ethical challenges faced by law enforcement, attorneys, the judiciary and correctional staff. Specific ethical scenarios common to he criminal justice system will be addressed. Emphasis on critical thinking and value decision making. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Morality, ethics and human behavior
2. Origins and concept of justice
3. Ethical decisions
4. Law and the individual
5. Ethics and criminal justice professionals
6. The police role in society: crime fighter or public servant
7. Ethics and legal professionals
8. Justice and judicial ethics
9. Ethics of punishment and corrections
10. Fundamentals of critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define ethics, morality and values. (1) (CT 1)
2. Describe the intersection of law, standards of morality, ethics and society. (1-3) (CT 1-3)
3. Describe the core elements of justice, punishment and law. (2) (CT 1-3)
4. Analyze the difference between distributive and retributive justice systems. (2) (CT 3,4)
5. Identify ethical and justice theories and explain their historical origins. (3) (CT 1-3)
6. Explain the purpose of codes and ethics. (4) (CT 1,2)
7. Identify and explain key ethical issues confronting law enforcement. (5,6) (CT 1- 4)
8. Identify and explain the factors involved in the use of discretion. (7) (CT 3)
9. Explain ethical considerations faced by members of the court. (8) (CT 1- 4)
10. Analyze ethical issues confronting correctional personnel. (9) (CT 1- 4)
11. Describe and model the fundamental concepts of critical thinking, including the barriers to critical thought and the recognition that closure is not always achieved in intellectual discourse. (10) (CT 1-4)

3
AJS170 Forensic Science

COURSE DESCRIPTION: AJS 170. Forensic Science (3). Characteristics and elements of forensic science and the processes of collecting, preserving and analyzing different types of physical evidence. Includes organization of a crime laboratory, crime scene processing and legal aspects. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Forensic science
2. Physical evidence
3. Physical properties: glass and soil
4. Organic analysis
5. Inorganic analysis
6. The microscope
7. Hairs, fibers, and paint
8. Drugs
9. Forensic toxicology
10. Forensic aspects of arson and explosion investigations
11. Forensic serology
12. DNA
13. Fingerprints
14. Document and voice examination
15. Forensic science and the Internet

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define the elements and characteristics that make up forensic science. (1)
2. Identify the components of physical evidence. (2)
3. Identify the different aspects of a crime laboratory. (3-7)
4. Illustrate the processes for handling drug cases. (8)
5. Describe components of forensic toxicology. (9)
6. Identify forensic aspects of arson and explosion investigations. (10)
7. Identify and discuss the role of DNA in today¿s criminal evidence. (11,12)
8. Apply principles and procedures of fingerprinting to the crime scene. (13)
9. Discuss utilization of documents and voice examinations. (14)
10. Identify the role of the Internet on forensic science. (15)

3
AJS230 The Police Function

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 230. The Police Function (3). History and development, procedures and methods of operations of law enforcement agencies. Role of the individual law enforcement officer. Career opportunities and the hiring process. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical overview and development of law enforcement agencies
2. Structure and jurisdiction of modern law enforcement agencies
3. Roles, functions, and operations of law enforcement in modern society
4. Law enforcement organization and management
5. Discretionary powers of the law enforcement officer
6. Professionalism and ethical issues related to law enforcement
7. Job-related problems of the individual officer
8. Hiring process and training

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Trace the history and development of early law enforcement agencies. (1)
2. Explain the role of law enforcement in terms of patrol, investigation, traffic enforcement, and crime prevention. (1-3, 5-7)
3. Identify the typical chain of command in law enforcement agencies. (2-4, 8)
4. Define discretion as related to law enforcement and describe the internal and external mechanisms which influence and control discretion. (5)
5. Describe current issues in law enforcement related to use of force, liability and community interaction and influence. (5-7)

3
AJS240 The Correction Function

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 240. The Correction Function (3). History and development of correctional theories, practices, and institutions. Modern ideologies and functions associated with both community-based and custodial corrections systems. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Overview of the criminal justice process
2. Evolution of corrections
3. Supreme Court decisions related to the corrections system
4. Goals and philosophies related to the treatment of offenders
5. Alternatives to incarceration
6. Correctional institutions
7. Parole
8. Capital punishment
9. Special problems related to the correctional system

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the three components of the criminal justice system and explain the role corrections plays within the system.
2. Summarize the historical development of the correction function within the criminal justice system.
3. Analyze the effect of Supreme Court decisions on the correctional system.
4. Name the generally accepted goals of corrections and explain the philosophies which led to the development of these goals.
5. Trace the historical development of probation, describe the function of probation, and identify alternatives to incarceration.
6. Identify and describe the organization of various types of correctional institutions and explain the management of each.
7. Outline the differences between parole and probation and describe the appropriate circumstances under which each is used.
8. Discuss issues related to capital punishment: history, laws, philosophies, and public opinion.
9. Identify and discuss problems and issues related to the modern correctional system.

3
AJS260 Procedural Criminal Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 260. Procedural Criminal Law (3). Procedural criminal law. Emphasis on rationale underlying major court holdings, the resulting procedural requirements, and the effect on the daily operations of the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical overview of the United States judicial system
a. Constitution
b. Supreme Court
c. Constitutional amendments
2. Police procedures
a. arrest
b. interrogation
c. search and seizure
3. Trial procedures
a. pretrial process
b. trial process
c. sentencing process
4. Corrections
a. prison
b. parole
5. Juvenile Justice System

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Summarize the development and the role of the United States Constitution and the United States Supreme Court in determining procedural requirements for the criminal justice system.
2. Describe the concepts of judicial review and judicial interpretation.
3. Define the first, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments to the constitution and explain their significance to procedural criminal law.
4. Analyze major cases and procedural requirements related to arrest, interrogation, and search and seizure by law enforcement.
5. Outline the steps in the pretrial, trial, and sentencing processes.
6. Analyze major cases and procedural requirements related to the pretrial, trial, and sentencing processes.
7. Analyze and define major cases and procedural requirements related to corrections procedures including probation, parole, and prison.
8. Identify and define major cases and procedural requirements related to the juvenile justice system.
9. Explain appellate jurisdiction and outline the appeal process.

3
Option 2 Requirement: 
AJS291 Intensive Police Academy

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 291. Intensive Police Certification (24). Study of criminal investigations, police community relations, traffic accident investigation, introduction to administration of justice, law, legal principles, patrol procedures, vehicle operations, report and technical writing, physical conditioning, defense tactics, impact weapons, firearm proficiency and safety, first aid, fundamentals of hazardous materials, stress management and use of force. This course contains the Arizona Peace Officers Standards and Training curriculum required for peace officer certification. Prerequisite: Student must be appointed by an Arizona law enforcement agency. Twenty-four lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Traffic laws
2. Traffic control
3. Crime prevention theory
4. Crime scene investigation
5. Social and psychological factors in human interaction
6. Criminal law and procedure; juvenile law and procedure
7. Corpus delecti of the major crimes against public order and crimes of process
8. Powers of the police to investigate and arrest
9. Search and seizure laws and procedures
10. The American court system and constitutional law
11. Civil law and process
12. Basic techniques of stopping, arresting and handling violators
13. Basic techniques of handling crisis cases, such as domestic disputes, bomb scares, crowd/ riot control, mental illness cases and disorderly conduct cases
14. Defensive driving and vehicle control
15. Physical conditioning
16. Liability and use of force
17. Firearms safety and marksmanship
18. Regulations/statutes

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Describe the procedures in recording and reporting investigation of the crime scene and in the collection of evidence. (4, 6-8)
2. Identify laws relating to traffic accidents. (1)
3. Apply methods and practices of modern crime prevention. (3, 7)
4. Interpret social and psychological factors important in human interactions. (5, 6, 13)
5. Explain police interactions with cultural/ethnic minorities. (5, 6, 11)
6. Apply procedures relating to traffic movement. (2)
7. Define laws and procedures regarding search and seizure. (6, 8, 9)
8. Describe the structure of the American court system. (6, 10, 18)
9. Explain basic techniques of patrol procedures, including handling crisis cases. (8, 12, 13)
10. Describe the connection of police and constitutional law. (6, 10)
11. Define powers of police to investigate and arrest. (8)
12. Use safe and defensive driving practices and the basic principles of emergency vehicle operation. (14)
13. Identify the principles of physical conditioning and calculate the relatedness of nutrition and health to physical conditioning. (15)
14. Use the police shotgun and handgun and safely handle firearms. (17)
15. Discuss the statutes and regulations regarding the use of force. (16, 18)

24

Note:  It is always best to discuss educational and career goals with an academic advisor prior to enrolling in any courses.  Learn more about Academic Advising.