Associate of Applied Science - Administration of Justice   
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About the Associate of Applied Science - Administration of Justice

Catalog Year: 2016-2017 (view other years)
Minimum credits required:  61

This program can be completed entirely online.

The Administration of Justice degree program is an interdisciplinary program of study which prepares students for a broad range of employment opportunities including law enforcement, corrections, probation/parole officer, and social services in the courts or community agencies.

In addition to preparing students for entry-level employment, this degree program is appropriate for individuals already employed in the justice field who are seeking skill upgrade and promotional opportunities, and individuals preparing to transfer to a four-year college/university with a major in Justice Studies.

Arizona State University, Arizona State University-West, Grand Canyon University, Northern Arizona University and the University of Arizona all offer baccalaureate degree programs in Justice Studies/Administration of Justice.

 

General and Program-Specific Requirements

Course Course Title Hours
I.  General Education
  A.  Foundation Studies (12 credits)
       1.  College Composition or Applied Communication - Select Option a or b:
          a.  Writing (6 credits)   1
Choose two courses from list - if preparing for transfer, choose College Comp I & II
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

          b.   Writing AND Communication (6 credits)
Choose one course from each list
 
Show / hide all applied communication/writing courses

Applied Communication/Writing Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/writing component of this degree.

AND
 
Show / hide all applied communication/comm. courses

Applied Communication/Comm. Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the applied communication/comm. component of this degree.

       2.  Numeracy (3 credits)            2
Choose from approved list - If preparing for transfer, choose MAT 152
 
Show / hide all quantitative literacy courses

Quantitative Literacy Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the quantitative literacy component of this degree.

       3.  Critical Thinking (3 credits)
AJS123 Ethics & Criminal Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 123. Ethics and Criminal Justice (3). Ethical issues, cultural influences and moral theories as they relate to the justice system. Focus on underlying values and ethical challenges faced by law enforcement, attorneys, the judiciary and correctional staff. Specific ethical scenarios common to he criminal justice system will be addressed. Emphasis on critical thinking and value decision making. Prerequisite: Reading Proficiency. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Morality, ethics and human behavior
2. Origins and concept of justice
3. Ethical decisions
4. Law and the individual
5. Ethics and criminal justice professionals
6. The police role in society: crime fighter or public servant
7. Ethics and legal professionals
8. Justice and judicial ethics
9. Ethics of punishment and corrections
10. Fundamentals of critical thinking

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define ethics, morality and values. (1) (CT 1)
2. Describe the intersection of law, standards of morality, ethics and society. (1-3) (CT 1-3)
3. Describe the core elements of justice, punishment and law. (2) (CT 1-3)
4. Analyze the difference between distributive and retributive justice systems. (2) (CT 3,4)
5. Identify ethical and justice theories and explain their historical origins. (3) (CT 1-3)
6. Explain the purpose of codes and ethics. (4) (CT 1,2)
7. Identify and explain key ethical issues confronting law enforcement. (5,6) (CT 1- 4)
8. Identify and explain the factors involved in the use of discretion. (7) (CT 3)
9. Explain ethical considerations faced by members of the court. (8) (CT 1- 4)
10. Analyze ethical issues confronting correctional personnel. (9) (CT 1- 4)
11. Describe and model the fundamental concepts of critical thinking, including the barriers to critical thought and the recognition that closure is not always achieved in intellectual discourse. (10) (CT 1-4)

3
  B.  Area Studies (7 credits)
       1.  Physical and Biological Science (4 credits)
Choose from Approved List - GLG100 must be taken with one other 2 credit GLG course
 
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Physical & Biol Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the physical & biol science (agec) component of this degree.

       2.  Behavioral OR Social Science (3 credits) 
       Strongly Recommended: SOC 142, SOC 212 or SOC 250 
Choose one course from either list
 
Show / hide all behavioral science (agec) courses

Behavioral Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the behavioral science (agec) component of this degree.

OR
 
Show / hide all social science (agec) courses

Social Science (AGEC) Courses

You may select from the following courses to fulfill the requirements of the social science (agec) component of this degree.

II.  Administration of Justice Requirements
AJS101 Intro Admin of Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 101. Introduction to Administration of Justice (3). Shared Unique Numbering LogoAJS 1101. Overview of the criminal justice system. Organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial, and correctional systems. History and philosophy of each component of the criminal justice system and interrelations among the various agencies. Career opportunities and qualifying requirements. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The social, political and legal issues defining crime
2. Statistical instruments used to measure crime
3. Law enforcement
a. History and philosophy
b. Organization and jurisdiction
c. Legal issues and due process
d. Recruitment, selection, and career opportunities
4. Judicial system
a. History and philosophy
b. Organization and jurisdiction
c. Due process of law
d. Pretrial and trial procedures
e. Professions related to the judicial system
5. Correctional system
a.History and philosophy
b. Organization and structure
c. Due process
d. Sentencing guidelines
e. Career opportunities
6. Overview of Juvenile Justice System
7. Future of criminal justice

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define crime in the context of social, political, and legal issues.
2. Identify the statistical instruments used to measure crime.
3. Identify and describe the organization and jurisdiction of the three components of the criminal justice system: Law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
4. Explain the history and philosophy of the three components of the criminal justice system.
5. Define due process of law in relation to each of the three components of the criminal justice system.
6. Identify and describe the organization and jurisdiction of the juvenile justice system.
7. Discuss future directions in the criminal justice system.
8. List career opportunities and qualifying requirements within the three components of the criminal justice system.

3
AJS109 Substantive Criminal Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 109. Substantive Criminal Law (3). Nature, origins, purposes, structure and operation of the American criminal justice system. Constitutional limitations. Classification and basic elements of crimes. Common defenses to crimes. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Origins and structure of the criminal justice system
2. Constitutional limitations on American criminal law
3. Classification and basic elements of crimes
4. Defenses to crime
5. Punishment and sentencing for crime
6. Types of crimes including: homicide and other crimes against persons; crimes against habitation and other crimes against property; white collar and public order crimes; drug- and alcohol-related crimes; obstruction of justice and organized crime

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain the origins and structure of the American criminal justice system. (1)
2. Identify the primary constitutional limits on American criminal law. (2)
3. List the classifications and basic elements of crimes. (3)
4. Identify the general defenses to criminal liability. (4)
5. Describe basic issues of criminal punishment and sentencing. (5)
6. Apply the elements of specific types of crimes to given fact patterns to determine if crimes have been committed. (6)

3
AJS170 Forensic Science

COURSE DESCRIPTION: AJS 170. Forensic Science (3). Characteristics and elements of forensic science and the processes of collecting, preserving and analyzing different types of physical evidence. Includes organization of a crime laboratory, crime scene processing and legal aspects. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Forensic science
2. Physical evidence
3. Physical properties: glass and soil
4. Organic analysis
5. Inorganic analysis
6. The microscope
7. Hairs, fibers, and paint
8. Drugs
9. Forensic toxicology
10. Forensic aspects of arson and explosion investigations
11. Forensic serology
12. DNA
13. Fingerprints
14. Document and voice examination
15. Forensic science and the Internet

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define the elements and characteristics that make up forensic science. (1)
2. Identify the components of physical evidence. (2)
3. Identify the different aspects of a crime laboratory. (3-7)
4. Illustrate the processes for handling drug cases. (8)
5. Describe components of forensic toxicology. (9)
6. Identify forensic aspects of arson and explosion investigations. (10)
7. Identify and discuss the role of DNA in today's criminal evidence. (11,12)
8. Apply principles and procedures of fingerprinting to the crime scene. (13)
9. Discuss utilization of documents and voice examinations. (14)
10. Identify the role of the Internet on forensic science. (15)

3
AJS200 Curr Issue/Criminal Just

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 200. Current Issues in Criminal Justice (3). Current issues, trends, and techniques related to and affecting the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Crime in the United States
a. criminal behavior
b. murder rates
c. race issues
d. drugs and crime
e. the criminal justice process
2. Victimology
a. victim rights
b. childhood victimization
c. battered women
3. Police
a. community policing
b. multiculturalism
c. use of deadly force and pursuits
d. ethics
4. Judicial System
a. jury system
b. expert witnesses
c. insanity defense
5. Juvenile Justice
a. transfers to adult court
b. kids and guns
c. teen courts
6. Punishment and Corrections
a. trends in probation
b. race issues
c. women in prison
d. prison overcrowding
e. death penalty

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain how current social issues, trends in criminal behavior, and the criminal justice process itself effects crime rates
2. Discuss current issues effecting victims of crime
3. Identify and explain current social issues affecting police work.
4. Discuss current policy issues related to police work.
5. Discuss specific issues related to the contemporary judicial system.
6. Assess recent trends in juvenile crime and resulting current philosophies and practices in juvenile justice.
7. Evaluate trends and policies in corrections based on current literary courses.

3
AJS212 Juvenile Justice Procedure

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 212. Juvenile Justice Procedures (3). History and development of juvenile justice theories, procedures and institutions. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of the juvenile justice system
2. Overview of the modern-day juvenile justice system.
3. Juvenile delinquency and the law
4. Police interaction with juveniles
5. Juvenile justice procedures
6. Current issues and problems with the juvenile justice system

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Outline the historical development of the juvenile justice system.
2. Outline the modern philosophies, organization and treatment/intervention goals of the juvenile justice system.
3. Name and explain landmark cases related to current juvenile justice laws.
4. Describe law enforcement procedures related to juvenile delinquency.
5. Outline juvenile justice procedures from arrest/intake through disposition.
6. Identify and discuss current issues and problems associated with the juvenile justice system.

3
AJS225 Criminology

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 225. Criminology (3). Theories of criminality and the economic, social and psychological impact of crime, victimization, and the relationships between statistics and crime trends. The study of deviance and society's role in defining behavior. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Theories of criminal behavior
2. Crime statistics and trends
3. Categories of crime
4. The impact of crime on society
5. Social structure and criminality

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify and summarize the various theories of criminal behavior.
2. Analyze the relationship between crime statistics and trends.
3. Categorize types of crimes.
4. Describe the economic and psychological impact of crime on society.
5. Explain the relationship between social status and criminality.

3
AJS230 The Police Function

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 230. The Police Function (3). History and development, procedures and methods of operations of law enforcement agencies. Role of the individual law enforcement officer. Career opportunities and the hiring process. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical overview and development of law enforcement agencies
2. Structure and jurisdiction of modern law enforcement agencies
3. Roles, functions, and operations of law enforcement in modern society
4. Law enforcement organization and management
5. Discretionary powers of the law enforcement officer
6. Professionalism and ethical issues related to law enforcement
7. Job-related problems of the individual officer
8. Hiring process and training

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Trace the history and development of early law enforcement agencies. (1)
2. Explain the role of law enforcement in terms of patrol, investigation, traffic enforcement, and crime prevention. (1-3, 5-7)
3. Identify the typical chain of command in law enforcement agencies. (2-4, 8)
4. Define discretion as related to law enforcement and describe the internal and external mechanisms which influence and control discretion. (5)
5. Describe current issues in law enforcement related to use of force, liability and community interaction and influence. (5-7)

3
AJS240 The Correction Function

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 240. The Correction Function (3). History and development of correctional theories, practices, and institutions. Modern ideologies and functions associated with both community-based and custodial corrections systems. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Overview of the criminal justice process
2. Evolution of corrections
3. Supreme Court decisions related to the corrections system
4. Goals and philosophies related to the treatment of offenders
5. Alternatives to incarceration
6. Correctional institutions
7. Parole
8. Capital punishment
9. Special problems related to the correctional system

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the three components of the criminal justice system and explain the role corrections plays within the system.
2. Summarize the historical development of the correction function within the criminal justice system.
3. Analyze the effect of Supreme Court decisions on the correctional system.
4. Name the generally accepted goals of corrections and explain the philosophies which led to the development of these goals.
5. Trace the historical development of probation, describe the function of probation, and identify alternatives to incarceration.
6. Identify and describe the organization of various types of correctional institutions and explain the management of each.
7. Outline the differences between parole and probation and describe the appropriate circumstances under which each is used.
8. Discuss issues related to capital punishment: history, laws, philosophies, and public opinion.
9. Identify and discuss problems and issues related to the modern correctional system.

3
AJS260 Procedural Criminal Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 260. Procedural Criminal Law (3). Procedural criminal law. Emphasis on rationale underlying major court holdings, the resulting procedural requirements, and the effect on the daily operations of the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Historical overview of the United States judicial system
a. Constitution
b. Supreme Court
c. Constitutional amendments
2. Police procedures
a. arrest
b. interrogation
c. search and seizure
3. Trial procedures
a. pretrial process
b. trial process
c. sentencing process
4. Corrections
a. prison
b. parole
5. Juvenile Justice System

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Summarize the development and the role of the United States Constitution and the United States Supreme Court in determining procedural requirements for the criminal justice system.
2. Describe the concepts of judicial review and judicial interpretation.
3. Define the first, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments to the constitution and explain their significance to procedural criminal law.
4. Analyze major cases and procedural requirements related to arrest, interrogation, and search and seizure by law enforcement.
5. Outline the steps in the pretrial, trial, and sentencing processes.
6. Analyze major cases and procedural requirements related to the pretrial, trial, and sentencing processes.
7. Analyze and define major cases and procedural requirements related to corrections procedures including probation, parole, and prison.
8. Identify and define major cases and procedural requirements related to the juvenile justice system.
9. Explain appellate jurisdiction and outline the appeal process.

3
AJS290 Constitutional Law/Civil Lib

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 290. Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3). The United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Includes the impact of U.S. Supreme Court opinions on the history and development of civil liberties and civil rights, particularly as they pertain to the administration of justice and law enforcement. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The Bill of Rights and U.S. Constitutional guarantees for civil liberties and civil rights
2. Constitutional interpretation and judicial review
3. Landmark U.S. Supreme Court opinions
4. Supreme Court interpretations of the Constitution on the administration of justice and law enforcement
5. The Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and the application of the privileges or immunities, due process and equal protection clauses

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Identify the key provisions of the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution that pertain to civil liberties and civil rights. (1)
2. Explain various competing theories of constitutional interpretation and judicial review. (2)
3. Analyze U.S. Supreme Court case law. (3)
4. Explain landmark Supreme Court rulings on civil liberties and civil rights. (3)
5. Describe the impact of key Supreme Court opinions on the administration of justice and law enforcement, including Miranda rights, the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, right to counsel, trial by jury, and double jeopardy. (4)
6. Identify the key provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment and the privileges or immunities, due process and equal protection clauses. (5)
7. Explain competing theories of incorporation of the Fourteenth Amendment. (5)

3
Select and complete 12 credits from the following courses:
AJS103 Public Safety Report Writing

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 103. Public Safety Report Writing (3) (Summer). Introduction to effective report writing in a variety of public safety incident settings, including law enforcement, fire safety and emergency medical situations. Emphasis on clear and concise writing as well as the legal ramifications of public safety reports. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Objectives of writing public safety reports
2. Writing public safety reports
3. Basic grammar and spelling
4. Chronological and topical ordering
5. Proofreading and editing
6. Basic computer skills and word processing programs
7. Legal implications and ramifications of public safety reports
8. Records retention and report confidentiality

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the larger objectives of writing public safety reports. (1)
2. Write reports that are concise and free of jargon. (2)
3. Use basic grammar and spelling skills. (3)
4. Craft a report in either chronological or topical order. (2, 4)
5. Proofread and edit a report. (5)
6. Use basic computer and word processing skills. (6)
7. Analyze legal ramifications and implications of public safety reports. (7)
8. Explain basic regulatory and legal requirements concerning records retention and report confidentiality. (8)

3
AJS192 Serial Killers and Mass Murder

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 192. Serial Killers and Mass Murderers (3). Motives, methods and states of mind of both serial killers and mass murderers. Includes profiling of these killers and their victims, as well as theories of causation. Three lecture. (Spring Only)

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Profiles of serial killers and mass murderers
2. The mind and motives of a serial killer
3. The mind and motives of a mass murderer
4. Theories of causation of serial and mass murderers
5. Victimology of serial and mass murderers
6. Media and public fascination with serial and mass murderers

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. 1. Compare and contrast the profiles of serial killers and mass murderers. (1)
2. Analyze the mind and motives of a serial killer and a mass murderer. (2,3)
4. Explain theories of causation of serial and mass murderers. (4)
5. Describe the victimology of serial and mass murderers. (5)
6. Discuss media and public fascination with serial and mass murderers. (6)

3
AJS226 Victimology and Crisis Interv

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 226. Victimology and Crises Intervention (3). The study of victims of crime, including reasons that some individuals are victimized and the legal protections afforded to victims. Includes crisis interventions by the criminal justice system to assist victims and their families. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. The study of victims of crime
2. Reasons some individuals are victimized
3. Legal protections afforded to victims of crime
4. Crisis interventions by the criminal justice system
5. Counseling and community services for victims of crime and their families

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define Victimology. (1)
2. Explain why some individuals are victimized. (2)
3. Analyze the legal protections afforded to victims of crime. (3)
4. Identify and describe various crisis interventions by the criminal justice system following crimes such as murder, sexual assault, domestic violence and child abuse. (4)
5. Discuss the role of counseling and community services for victims of crime and their families. (5)

3
AJS252 Homeland Security

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 252. Homeland Security (3) (Summer). Introduction to Homeland Security and homeland defense policies and strategies, with a focus on immigration and border security. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History and structure of the U.S Department of Homeland Security and related federal agencies
2. Strategic goals of Homeland Security and national defense
3. Impacts on state and local security
4. Impact on the U.S. criminal justice system
5. Constitutional and ethical issues
6. Risks to Homeland Security

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the history and structure of the U.S Homeland Security Department. (1)
2. Identify various strategic goals of Homeland Security and national defense. (2)
3. Explain how Homeland Security impacts state and local security. (3)
4. Discuss impact of Homeland Security on the U.S criminal justice system. (4)
5. Analyze the various Constitutional and ethical issues concerning Homeland Security, including enhanced interrogation, airport security and the Patriot Act. (5)
6. Analyze various risks to Homeland Security, including terrorism, immigration and border security, and data security. (6)

3
AJS256 Terrorism

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 256. Terrorism (3) (Fall). History and causes of terrorism, with a focus on why the Unites States has become a target of terrorist groups. Includes approaches for combating and preventing terrorism.Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. History of terrorism
2. Theories and causes of terrorism and the radicalization process
3. Combating and preventing terrorism
4. Impact of terrorism on the U.S. criminal justice system and national security
5. Terrorist attacks

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the history of terrorism, domestically and internationally. (1)
2. Explain various competing theories on the causes of terrorism and the radicalization process, at home and abroad. (2)
3. Identify various approaches to combating and preventing terrorism. (3)
4. Describe various changes to the U.S criminal justice system caused by terrorist attacks in the United States and abroad. (4)
5. Describe the various changes in national security approaches caused by terrorist attacks in the United States and abroad. (5)
6. Discuss the prevailing patterns and trends in modes of attack, weaponry and strategies of terrorists. (5)

3
AJS275 Criminal Investigations

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 275. Criminal Investigations (3). Theories of criminal investigation. Includes basic investigative techniques of crime scene procedures, case preparation, and interview techniques. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Definition and goals of investigation
2. Role of the investigator
3. Crime scene management
4. Physical evidence procedures
5. Interview techniques
6. Investigations of specific crimes
7. Investigative report writing

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Define investigation and describe the goals of criminal investigation.
2. Explain the role of the investigator and describe the attributes of a successful investigator.
3. Define a crime scene and explain protecting and recording the crime scene.
4. Identify, collect, preserve, and transport physical evidence.
5. Describe the steps involved in preparing for interviews, use interview techniques, and list common interview problems.
6. List and describe the basic investigative steps involved in specific crimes.
7. Prepare and write an investigative report.

3
AJS278 Neuroscience and the Law

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 278. Neuroscience and the Law (3). A multi-disciplinary look at how new discoveries in neuroscience and our understanding of the brain are having a direct impact on the criminal justice system. Three lecture.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Existence of free will
2. Neuroscience of decision-making
3. Punishment, blameworthiness and rehabilitation
4. Adolescent brains and juvenile justice
5. Mental Illness/insanity defense
6. Memory and eyewitness identification

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Discuss the key neuroscience and consciousness theories concerning whether humans have free will. (1)
2. Discuss the implications of brain scans on our understanding of decision-making. (2)
3. Evaluate different theories of punishment and rehabilitation in light of latest neurological findings. (3)
4. Explain the differences in adult and adolescent brains and the effects on juvenile justice. (4)
5. Discuss the implications of latest neurological findings on legal concepts of mental illness and insanity. (5)
6. Discuss the implications of latest neurological findings on memory and their impact on eyewitness identification. (6)

3
AJS296 Internship: Adm. of Justice

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AJS 296. Internship: Administration of Justice (3). Supervised field experience with businesses, corporations, government agencies, schools and community organizations to expand career interests and apply subject knowledge relevant to the workplace. Individualized internship placements to develop personal and professional skills, including professional ethics, leadership, and civic responsibility. Prerequisite: Student must a GPA of 2.0; have completed specific degree requirements as required by the program; and have completed the internship application process. [Repeatable for a total of 6 credit hours towards degree/certificate requirements.] S/U grading only.

COURSE CONTENT:
1. Organizational overview of assigned placement
2. Integration of job description and organization's requirements
3. Elements of documentation of experience
4. Planning and time management
5. Professional, legal, and ethical issues
6. Communication, critical thinking, and problem solving
7. Specialized equipment, tools, and software required in the placement

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Exhibit appropriate workplace behaviors and professional ethics.
2. Apply discipline specific knowledge and skills in the professional workplace.
3. Define and utilize technical terms in written and oral communications.
4. Use critical thinking, problem solving, ethical awareness, and effective writing
5. Interpret written and oral instructions.
6. Initiate and complete assigned responsibilities.
7. Maintain documentation required to comply with government employer or nonprofit agency regulations.
8. Use specialized equipment, software, and tools as required.
9. Analyze and interpret data for specified reports.
10. Identify opportunities for improvement in process and documentation related to the workplace.
11. Articulate job description and position in assigned organization.

REQUIRED ASSESSMENT:
1. Record of Student Internship workplace hours.
2. Individual Education Plan (IEP) as approved by supervision faculty.
3. A daily journal, or work log of tasks, including dates, descriptive comments, problems and solutions.
4. A reflective paper or project as specified by the supervision faculty.
5. A minimum of two evaluations by the workplace employer or supervisor.
6. Student's self-evaluation of experience.

3
1 - Students preparing for transfer must complete College Composition I & II
2 - Students preparing for transfer must complete MAT 152

Program Outcomes

Call and get advisedUpon successful completion of the Administration of Justice Degree program, the learner will be able to:

 

  1. Explain the historical development of American criminal law from its English common law roots to the present. (AJS 101)
  2. Analyze criminal conduct in the context of historical, social, political and legal developments. (AJS 101, AJS 109)
  3. Identify the organization and jurisdiction of local state and federal law enforcement, courts and correctional systems. (AJS 101, AJS 230, AJS 240)
  4. Describe the relationships between the three components of the criminal justice system. (AJS 109, AJS 230, AJS 240)
  5. Summarize the philosophy of legal sanctions and corrections and the historical development of theories of punishment and rehabilitation. (AJS 109, AJS 240)
  6. Analyze the intersection of law, morality and ethics in our modern society. (AJS 123)
  7. Summarize the modern scientific tools used in criminal investigation. (AJS 170)
  8. Analyze current issues and trends in crime rates, criminal behavior, and social trends as they impact the criminal justice process. (AJS 200)
  9. Outline the modern philosophies, organization and treatment/intervention goals of the juvenile justice system. (AJS 212)
  10. Identify and summarize the various theories of the causes of criminal behavior. (AJS 225)
  11. Analyze the role of the US Supreme Court in defining the Constitutional protections and procedural due process safeguards in the criminal justice system. (AJS 260)
  12. Describe the economic and psychological impact of crime on society. (AJS 225, AJS 240)
  13. Define investigation and describe the goals of criminal investigation. (AJS 275)
  14. Identify the key provisions of the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution that pertain to civil liberties and civil rights, and explain various competing theories of constitutional interpretation and judicial review. (AJS 290)
  15. (A) Discuss selected social problems (SOC250), OR (B) Describe the ways society shapes and defines the positions and roles of both men and women (SOC 212), OR (C) Analyze contemporary racial and ethnic intergroup relations emphasizing cultural origins, developments, and problems of minority groups in the United States (SOC142)